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MarkH

Help! My BC bit a 10-year old.

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Anyway, I have been told that I MUST make a report, that it's the law
I understand what your "blah blah.." means, but let me add. A hospital is NOT going to turn you away. They have liability. They will try to threaten you, but you do not have to tell them anything. No one said you had to say it was a dog bite. They are still going to give you anitbiotics for a puncture. Even if you say it is a dog bite, you can say it was a stray.

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understand what your "blah blah.." means, but let me add. A hospital is NOT going to turn you away. They have liability. They will try to threaten you, but you do not have to tell them anything. No one said you had to say it was a dog bite. They are still going to give you anitbiotics for a puncture. Even if you say it is a dog bite, you can say it was a stray.

 

"Blah, Blah, Blah"--because I've been through it so many times, I just about know the routine verbatim. At one point, they remembered me, went through the obligatory request, I went through my routine and that was that. It's something they must do by law, but the bitten person is not bound by law to fill out the paperwork. I always told them it was either my dogs or a dog that I knew, who were well taken care of and I didn't feel the necessity for the paperwork. That usually got through to them.

 

If I were ever bitten by a stray, or if anyone is bitten by a stray, I'd comply with the paperwork request.

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If I were ever bitten by a stray, or if anyone is bitten by a stray, I'd comply with the paperwork request.
I agree 100%. You need to follow through on a stray bite, or a bite from a dog you do not beleive has had shots.

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One time many years ago I was nipped by a dog while riding my bike. The tooth just lightly broke the skin.

 

I was a mile from home and of course I didn't know the dog. There was no way to catch the dog, as it ran off after the incident.

 

I didn't seek medical help. Using my accumulated knowledge since then, it was a mistake to not get medical attention. If this were to happen now I would want to get rabies vaccine. I made the assumption that the odds were slim that the dog was rabid, but it would be fatal to make the wrong assumption.

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JoAnne,

 

I can tell you only about my experience raising shelties and my 2 BCs who were and are all sensitive dogs that I notice that at around 8 mos old they go through a fear period. Forcing a dog to face it's fears at this time is a good way to make those fears lasting and deepseated. it's better to back off of scary situations to a level that the dog can easily deal with-usually with distance. When my dogs went through fear periods I either kept them home or tried other familiar surroundings but if they reacted to say, a walk in the park, then we very calmly went home with me doing the jolly routine all the way (by laughing and giggling and playing and saying just how silly my puppy was).

 

Good luck,

Annette

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Lisa I would like to ask you and/or anyone else who can give me advice... if you either see or become the recipient of your dog nipping or biting... how would you handle the "right now", what would your "reaction", be???
My reaction to your question is that once it gets to the point of nipping/biting, it's already gone too far. You should have reacted to change the situation long before it got to that point, and you should not be putting enough stress on your dog that a bite is likely to occur.

 

Sometimes things happen very quickly though, and it can be hard to pre-empt every possible scenario. For that reason, it may be a good idea to practice likely situations ahead of time; for instance, imagine a small child is running up to pet the doggy. What would you do? Actually practice the physical motions with your dog right there on leash, so that if it does happen, you've already practiced what you need to do. Practice stepping in front of your dog with your hand extended in the "universal stop signal", and say "STOP!" in a commanding and assertive tone of voice. People might think you're crazy if you practice this on the street while walking your dog, but it's better to be thought insane than to have your dog bite a "well meaning if not ignorant about dog behavior" human. Then practice your talk on how it's not a good idea to approach dogs that you don't know, and that you should always ask the dog's owner for permission before ever petting a dog you don't know.

 

At the moment of a bite or a nip, my reaction would be to get the dog the heck out of that situation first and foremost. Either put the dog in the car if you've driven to the location, in the house if you're near home, in the other room if you're at home, or if you're away from home and have no place to put the dog, just back the dog off to a safe distance. Next, if anyone was bitten or nipped, make contact with them and find out the extent of any damage, apologize profusely, and offer to pay for medical treatment.

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