Jump to content
BC Boards
Sign in to follow this  
Guest

Help in a very unique situation.

Recommended Posts

Guest

Background information. So my dogs vet office which I’m now firmly switching as this situation was the final straw we’ve been having problems with them ever since they were recently bought by a new company. Long story short their computer system got screwed up with all the changes and the vaccine reminders didn’t go out leaving my dog vulnerable to eventually contract Kennel Cough. This is where the complicated situation arises I have a puppy on the way in the next month I’m at a loss of what to do as obviously I don’t want the pup to get kennel cough. Any one have any suggestions? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe do some research on kennel cough before panicking?

Kennel cough is basically the canine version of a cold in humans and according to vaccine and immunity researcher Dr. Ronald Schultz it isn't even a vaccine preventable disease. The best the vaccine can do is possibly reduce the severity of the already self limiting disease, not prevent it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I’m just gonna ignore the rudeness of the first part of that statement because I don’t know you and it’s not worth my time. Thank you for that incredibly unhelpful response if you e nothing useful to share please don’t. 1 yes vaccines can help prevent this from happening. 2. It’s not a cold considering my dog my child spent the entire two days hacking up white foam before he was given anti biotics to treat it. Also puppies have incredibly fragile immune systems. Look I’ve got C ptsd diagnosed and currently being treated I don’t respond well to feeling under attack so maybe think about that next time you snark on someone YOU DON”t KNOW on the internet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay then. Doing some basic research is always helpful. And it’s not rude to suggest it. When we understand stuff better, it reassures us in the decisions we make. Also talk to your local vet to get their input on the situation. 

Just vaccinate the puppy before bringing it home. The oral vaccine can be given at 8 weeks.

Keep copies of your vaccine records. I write stuff on the last page of my calendar or stick it in my phone calendar.

Remember that vaccinated dogs can still get kennel cough - vaccines for bacteria aren’t 100% effective. If it’s a huge worry to you, perhaps passing on this puppy and getting one a few months further down the road would be a good idea.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My response was rude? :blink:

And offering some information about what you'll find if you do the suggested research and a starting point with the foremost authorities on the subject about where to look is unhelpful? :wacko:

There's only one person attacking or being rude in this thread so far . . . and it isn't me. :rolleyes:

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/23/2019 at 2:26 PM, Riika said:

Yeah, your response came across to me as a little snarky too... 

I agree with Riika. All Gentle Lake did was suggest that you do some research, which is a good idea. If you come here with a chip on your shoulder you will be seeing trouble everywhere you look. Maybe think about that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, D'Elle said:

I agree with Riika. All Gentle Lake did was suggest that you do some research, which is a good idea. If you come here with a chip on your shoulder you will be seeing trouble everywhere you look. Maybe think about that. 

No, I was referring to Gentle Lake's response. The "maybe do some research" part seemed like it could have been put differently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't take her response as snarky.  It's hard to interpret people's "tone of voice" in posts on the internet.

If I was in your shoes, I would get the pup vaccinated by the breeder 2 weeks prior to coming to your home.  No, it's not a guaranteed way to prevent it, but it will stack the odds in your favor.

Kennel cough is more akin to whooping cough, but your average dog does not get terribly sick from it.  Puppies, immune suppressed, short nosed, elderly dogs would be higher risk.  The rare dog will get pneumonia, but that really isn't common.  Now canine influenza really makes them ill.  That is a whole different ball of wax.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Riika said:

No, I was referring to Gentle Lake's response. The "maybe do some research" part seemed like it could have been put differently.

whoops, sorry I misinterpreted you, Riika. :)

I guess we could always put things differently, but I notice that sometimes people react strongly to things others say in all innocence, and it happens more of course when it is electronic instead of face to face. And in my experience, whether face to face or not it is not possible always to prevent another person's negative reaction, no matter how one words something.

At any rate, the OP has no doubt fled by now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sigh, another biased article with poor information in the anti vaccine camp.  Please refer to real studies, not opinion articles.  We have too much anti vaccine BS right now.

Please provide references to actual studies.

Demonstration of 1-year duration of immunity for attenuated Bordetella bronchiseptica vaccines in dogs.
Vet Ther. Winter 2008;9(4):257-62.
Craig Lehar1, Huchappa Jayappa, Jason Erskine, Alicia Brown, Diane Sweeney, Terri Wassmoen
1 Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health, Elkhorn, NE 68022, USA.

Abstract
Three groups of healthy dogs with low antibody titers to Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb), canine parainfluenza virus (CPI), and canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) were used in this study. One group was vaccinated with a single dose of monovalent attenuated Bb vaccine and one group with a trivalent vaccine containing attenuated Bb, CPI, and CAV-2; dogs were vaccinated intranasally with a single dose of the respective vaccines. The third group served as unvaccinated controls. All vaccinated dogs subsequently developed serum antibody titers to Bb that persisted for at least 1 year. Following Bb challenge 1 year after vaccination, all vaccinated dogs, regardless of group, showed significantly fewer clinical signs and shed significantly fewer challenge organisms than unvaccinated controls. These results demonstrate that intranasal administration of a single dose of monovalent attenuated Bb vaccine or trivalent vaccine containing attenuated Bb, CPI, and CAV-2 provides 1 year of protection against Bb.

 

Comparison of the mucosal immune response in dogs vaccinated with either an intranasal avirulent live culture or a subcutaneous antigen extract vaccine of Bordetella bronchiseptica
Vet Ther. Spring 2007;8(1):32-40.
Randy Davis1, Huchappa Jayappa, Omar Y Abdelmagid, Rob Armstrong, Diane Sweeney, Craig Lehr
1 Schering Plough Animal Health, 21401 West Center Road, Elkhorn, NE 68022.

Abstract
Healthy dogs with low antibody titer to Bordetella bronchiseptica were vaccinated intranasally with an avirulent live vaccine, subcutaneously with an antigen extract vaccine, or subcutaneously and intranasally with a placebo. Intranasally vaccinated dogs developed B. bronchiseptica-specific IgA titers in nasal secretions that remained at high levels until the end of the study; dogs vaccinated subcutaneously with the antigen extract or placebo did not develop measurable antigen-specific IgA titers in nasal secretions. Dogs were challenged with virulent live B. bronchiseptica 63 days after vaccination. Intranasally vaccinated dogs had significantly lower cough scores (P < or =.0058) and shed significantly fewer challenge organisms (P <.0001) than dogs in either of the other groups. Cough scores of subcutaneously vaccinated dogs were not significantly different from placebo-vaccinated dogs.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing that information about the kennel cough vaccine! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...