Jump to content
BC Boards
Sign in to follow this  
Lawgirl

Frog sniffer dogs

Recommended Posts

The same people have been using their dogs to survey fox activity in Warrnambool, Victoria, to help out the maremma dogs who guard the penguins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well at least they are not licking toads, but who knows, it's a slippery slope...

On a more serious note, thanks for the link, very interesting!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing.

 

I love reading about all the great stuff people are training border collies to do.

 

Me too. thanks for posting that link.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the link. I am not surprised at the usefulness of these dogs (or any dogs in this capacity).

I know someone in a local group. The group used to be SAR, but that was a LOT of work and they didn't get many calls for their services. They have now transitioned to mostly conservancy work (and some HRD). 

Their leader/organizer? has many contacts within the university community that want to use dogs for research purposes - mainly to detect various species in order to track their number, their habitat and sometimes, over the years, in a longitudinal study to determine if the population is increasing or decreasing. Right now, the members chose from among several projects based on their interests - various species of salamanders, skinks, turtles, spiders and ?? (but no one wants to do spiders). They train their dogs to detect the species, they are tested to validate the ability of the dog to correctly ID the species, and then, when in the field, if the dog alerts, they have to get photographic evidence to confirm the find.

It is interesting to hear about the different studies they are involved in. What is also interesting is that they have dogs that can distinguish between one species of salamander and another.  In that I mean, one dog can detect salamander A and will not alert on salamander B, and vice versa for another dog.

Canine noses are so amazing. I also love hearing about all the multiple uses they are finding  for these dogs to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gcv-border I completely agree that this sort of work is amazing, and it is wonderful what canine noses can do. 

I wonder how long dogs (not just BCs) have been used in conservancy work?  It seems so obvious once you hear about it, as it is really a natural extension of dog's instincts, but someone had to think of it first...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC, I heard about cancer-detecting dogs about 15 +/- years ago.

And for conservancy dogs, I seem to remember reading an article about a group in the PNW using high-drive rescue dogs (too crazy for the average owner, but perfect for working) for conservancy projects 7-8 years ago (thus, they had been using them for several years prior to the article).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember reading journal articles at least 30 years ago on game bird population monitoring in which the researchers used, wait for it...,  Brittanys and German Shorthairs to locate gamebirds.  Because, duh.  :D  What's really surprising is that it took so long to figure out that dogs can be trained to detect other species besides quail and grouse and pheasants.  I'll admit though, that frog detection is not something I would have thought of.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find it surprising that human beings did not long ago figure out how thoroughly useful dogs are in so many ways. I applaud all growth in this direction, however late I feel it is in coming, because the more useful they are the more respect they may get as an animal, and that will benefit all dogs.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/15/2018 at 7:06 PM, gcv-border said:

Thanks for the link. I am not surprised at the usefulness of these dogs (or any dogs in this capacity).

I know someone in a local group. The group used to be SAR, but that was a LOT of work and they didn't get many calls for their services. They have now transitioned to mostly conservancy work (and some HRD). 

Their leader/organizer? has many contacts within the university community that want to use dogs for research purposes - mainly to detect various species in order to track their number, their habitat and sometimes, over the years, in a longitudinal study to determine if the population is increasing or decreasing. Right now, the members chose from among several projects based on their interests - various species of salamanders, skinks, turtles, spiders and ?? (but no one wants to do spiders). They train their dogs to detect the species, they are tested to validate the ability of the dog to correctly ID the species, and then, when in the field, if the dog alerts, they have to get photographic evidence to confirm the find.

It is interesting to hear about the different studies they are involved in. What is also interesting is that they have dogs that can distinguish between one species of salamander and another.  In that I mean, one dog can detect salamander A and will not alert on salamander B, and vice versa for another dog.

Canine noses are so amazing. I also love hearing about all the multiple uses they are finding  for these dogs to do.

I’m just noticing this now. A SAR friend and I have talked about wanting getting involved in detection research on an academic level. We love the science aspect of detection and would love to be more involved with research in it.

 

Do you think that your acquaintance would be willing to chat with us sometime?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bee-sniffing dogs are an awesome example of how dogs are so valuable.

Maralynn - I sent a message so we don't divert this topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maralynn - I just tried to send a message through this group. The site says that you can not receive messages.  ???   Try to send me a message.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×