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CaelinTess

CGC class or beginner agility first?

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I am wondering which I should take first.

 

CGC so that Tess has some serious practice with people & dog encounters in a controlled environment and will maybe be able to focus better on the obstacles in agility? Or should we take agility (beginner class, all done on-leash) first and then Tess will maybe build some confidence before we take the CGC prep class?

 

I figure if it does not matter at all, I will take whatever one is available first (I think they both go in 8-week cycles).

 

Also, if I have a second dog at the time I enroll in a class, I will enroll the other dog in the opposite class.

 

Allie & Tess

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I'd do CGC first. That way you can work on attention and manners, and proof things that will be handy for agility, like a recall and a stay. Also, for a shy dog a CGC is a good goal to work toward.

 

Solo and I took a CGC class before we took anything else. He passed with the best performance of any of the dogs in his class, believe it or not, and it's a handy thing to be able to tell people that he has a CGC certificate. I'll probably need it to be able to rent apartments in the future and stuff like that, since he's "special."

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As an unofficial lurker for the last two months I just wanted to add my two cents.

 

As an agility instructor I would prefer it if handlers and dogs would have a basic obedience class under their belts(or collars). I believe it lays the foundation for the close teamwork needed in agility. It also gives the dog some confidence while they are learning new and strange pieces of equipment.

 

I also prefer that people do not learn to depend on halti's or gentle leaders or chokers for training in general because we do not permit any of those in our agility classes. A flat collar for beginners and no collar for more advanced dogs.

 

Again, my two cents...good luck with your classes.

Deanna

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Tess knows basic obedience and a bunch of silly tricks, so the CGC class should be a brush-up for the basic stuff. My goal for the CGC class is to work on the greeting people/dogs part. I want this to be stress free (for both of us). If we pass, great. If not, no big deal.

 

I asked the agility instructor and she said she did not care either way, she thought each class would benefit the other and so left it up to me to decide.

 

Thanks everyone for your opinions. I think I will likely take the CGC class first with Tess. I think that's a good idea.

 

Allie & Tess

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Take the CGC class first. Once you start agility, you'll never look back. It's a bit addicting....

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What is a CGC class....all I could come up with is Coast Guard Corrections, Collie Glass Catch...obviously Piper hasn't taken the CGC class....

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CGC= "Canine Good Citizen"

 

the CGC is a test (resulting in a certificate) from the AKC. You can take a class to prepare if you want--or you can just take the class to learn more about helping your dog be a "good citizen" without taking the test.

 

The CGC test has 10 individual tests given to determine if the dog can do basic obedience (Sit, Down, Stay, Come), tolerate strangers, other dogs, startling noises (an umbrella opening suddenly, a box of empty cans dropped on the floor....), strangers touching him with your permission (think "vet"), etc.

 

A class for CGC would help you prepare your dog for this kind of test. I'm not sure of it's of value as pre-agility unless your dog really needs more basic obedience training anyway.

 

Our Agility trainer has an "Obedience for Agility" class, required before Beginning Agility, that taught specific Obedience kinds of things for pre-agility dogs (after the Basic Obedience class). Things like "Stay" for a start-line stay and lead-out; targetting (both a target and the handler's hand); moving with and in front of the handler at a run ("Cone Races", doing figure-8's around cones, sending the dogs around them from a couple feet away); working on both sides of the handler rather than just on the left; Wraps, Switches and turns. We didn't work with the obstacles, but started some 2-on-2-off contact work with the target (on a flat board).

 

Anyway, if you can find something like that, or if the Beginning Agility class you are considering includes those things, I would skip the CGC class unless you need the CGC certificate for some reason. It is required by some organizations for things like SAR and Therapy Dogs. It can sometimes help if you are trying to rent a place when you have a dog--things like that.

 

Deanna in OR

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tolerate strangers, other dogs, startling noises (an umbrella opening suddenly, a box of empty cans dropped on the floor....), strangers touching him with your permission (think "vet"), etc.

 

These are the things Tess needs practice with. Her basic obedience is stellar. :rolleyes:

 

In our most recent obedience class, Tess stayed in a sit-stay and a down-stay while I did incredibly stupid things like hula hoop, etc. and there was massive activity going on as other owners were doing equally foolish things while their dogs either joined them by jumping through a hoop, running through a tunnel, wearing a sombrero, or watched as their owners sang "How much is that doggie in the window."

 

I am pretty confident in Tess's basic obedience. :D

 

Oh - and we won Musical Chairs in her puppy next step. Tess had the best stay in her class.

 

Allie & Tess

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Allie said

tolerate strangers, other dogs, startling noises (an umbrella opening suddenly, a box of empty cans dropped on the floor....), strangers touching him with your permission (think "vet"), etc.

 

These are the things Tess needs practice with. Her basic obedience is stellar.

So it sounds like a CGC class would be a good thing for Tess, since there are likely to be at least some of the scary distractions in Agility class and later at trials--even if her basic obedience is great already.

 

Do you know if the CGC class you're considering will focus on *gently* getting sensitive dogs like Tess ready for some of the scarier tests? Is there a class schedule that shows all the things that will be covered in the class?

 

Deanna in OR

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The lady who does the CGC class was very prompt with an email reply. I will write and ask her for a schedule and how she would handle a dog who does not want to approach people on her own. Thanks. That should be pretty helpful.

 

In the last class we took, after Tess did not want to walk up to people, the instructor ordered me to "pull her up here! Don't let her get away with that!"

 

Get away with WHAT? She was SCARED. Forcing a dog or a horse to do something scary does not make them less afraid, it makes them more afraid.

 

That lady is very close to where I will be living and offers the CGC, but I sure won't be taking that class.

 

Allie & Tess

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