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Waterproof footwear - suggestions?

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I am fed up with getting my feet wet on my morning walks with the dogs. I often walk through the fields, and the grass is usually wet with morning dew.

 

I am familiar with MuckBoots and Bogs - and do have a pair of the Mucks -- , but I prefer not to walk/hike in them. They are fine for walking around when doing barn work, but for the more up-and-down hills 'hiking' I do when walking the dogs, I would prefer more of a -- well, hiking shoe. I have purchased a couple pair of 'waterproof or water-resistant' hiking shoes/boots that were made of Gore-Tex ($$), but my experience is that they are fine for about 15 minutes in the dew-covered grass, then my feet start getting wet.

 

Does anyone know of a brand that makes a waterproof (really waterproof) hiker? I think my search might be more successful if my shoe size was large enough to use a men's size, but unfortunately, I am not able to fit into men's shoes.

 

Thanks.

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I think they make Mucks with different types of support/insole. Mine have a pretty cushy/supportive insole and I walk in them for a long time with no issues. I track in mine and wear them out in the winter when its always wet/raining here. They are shorter with a neoprene side panel (and flowers!).

 

I have the same issue with "waterproof" shoes. I sprang for Merrills because they were so comfy but they do NOT keep my feet dry. I can only wear them in drier weather.

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Good leather boots that are comfortable. Then apply mink oil to them. It will darken the color but is great for waterproofing. It does require reapplication, how often depends on how often you are out in the wet. I just rub it in with my fingers. If conditions are really wet for a prolonged time I will apply as often as 3 or even 4 times a week . A little rubbed in goes a long way. My feet stay dry.

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I've got a pair of Cabelas leather/waterproof low cut hiking boots (they've got a decent selection of women's sizes) and they were nicely waterproof for 2 years. The boots are still in decent shape just not waterproof anymore after 2 years years of use

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If your size is too small for men's shoes, try looking at boy's. You probably won't have as much selection, but once you've found what you want, it might be worth at least looking to see if they come in boy's sizes.

 

Good luck. ;)

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I like rubber overshoes... Look up tingley. Put a little baby powder inside them then slip right over your shoes. You Will, however, lose a little traction. But I know how you feel, hate having wet feet, and the tingley (or any brand of your choosing) seem to work.

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Good leather boots that are comfortable. Then apply mink oil to them. It will darken the color but is great for waterproofing. It does require reapplication, how often depends on how often you are out in the wet. I just rub it in with my fingers. If conditions are really wet for a prolonged time I will apply as often as 3 or even 4 times a week . A little rubbed in goes a long way. My feet stay dry.

 

^^ this, I've yet to wear a 'fabric' (goretex or not) shoe-boot that didn't get wet. Full leather (with as little seams as possible) does the trick. Brand not as important as fit-comfort. Look for something at your local outdoor shop (EMS, LL Bean, etc.).

 

Not cheap but on the other hand I look at my leather boots that I've treated twice with beeswax in their life time of .... hmmm... way too many years but still waterproof even if about ready to be scrapped from years of hiking wear and tear.

 

If walking through mud, long grass, etc; gaiters can be an option to prevent water from getting over the top of the boots.

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I have resorted to flip-flops when it's really really bad. Yes, they get wet, but mud hoses right off, and at least you can walk through the flooded mucky areas. And if they slip off in said areas they float and are bright colours. I know, I know, unhelpful post, I'll get back in my box.

 

I had a great pair of waterproof boots, can't remember the brand, but in the kind of weather I'm talking about the water wicked into them from my sodden trousers and they just filled. Stayed fabulously waterproof though, they could have doubled as buckets.

 

Spare pair of socks is another great man.

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I have a pair of Merills that I really like as the are comfortable and fit my narrow feet, but after about a half a year of wear I'm finding my feet getting wet. I even sprayed them with camp dry many times and doesn't seem to do much. I've had a hard time finding a good leather hiker that fits my feet. I have muck boots too, but only wear them for chores or where I don't need to really do much walking as they rub my heels. Sorry I'm not much help, I'll be interested in what others have to say.

 

Samantha

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They aren't made in the USA anymore, and don't hold up to hard work for as long (although that probably doesn't matter as much if you're not on a fishing boat all day), but Xtra Tuf boots are great. You can get "sokkets"- little slippers that you wear inside them like insulated socks- for extra warmth. I wore my Xtra Tufs for 8-10 hrs every day, almost constant moving. The old USA ones held up for at least a season and a half; the new ones from overseas last a year.

 

I can't wear Muck Boots or Bogs- they just don't fit my feet. Never had trouble with Xtra Tufs. Plus, the way the ankle is cut, when the back rips out (where it always does for me), I cut the tops off & have a pair of low water proof shoes :)

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I got some Vasque hiking boots from REI. I will use them if I'm out working sheep or hiking on a wet field or if it's muddy. They saved my life at the Finals last fall when it was unbelievably muddy and wet. I had good enough traction that I didn't kill myself, and my feet stayed dry despite the nonstop drizzle over four days. They're quite comfortable, and I'm able to wear them all day long if need be.

 

Plus they're not so heavy as to make it impossible for me to drive in them - they're lighter in weight than the Vasque boots I bought several decades ago (!) for backpacking. I can't imagine driving in THOSE.

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I've had some great waterproof shoes over the years, most well made hiking boots. Wool socks (even in the summer) also help with wet feet problems, I LOVE my wool socks.

 

Try some gaiters-they attach to the laces of boots and go under the foot and go up to the knee or almost (I'm short so mine go over the knee usually). You can find water proof gaiters which are easy to wear and keep the lower pant legs dry at places like REI, my favorite place for such is Sierra Trading Post.

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I have muck boots too, but only wear them for chores or where I don't need to really do much walking as they rub my heels.

 

I have this problem with them, too.

 

The other problem for me is the fit. They don't have half sizes so the ones I bought are a tight fit. I can only wear the very thinnest of socks with them. But I literally walked out of the next size up. (Hmmm. Maybe I need 2 pairs. One for summer and another that I can wear very thick socks in for winter?)

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I have my mucks for winter primarily because I needed the half size and the whole size up allows me to wear very thick socks. I have a wonderful OLD pair of rubber boots from France "Le Chameau" brand (the camel) that I use in warmer months, but find the gaiters lighter although more of a hassle to put on

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