Jump to content
BC Boards
HJTRAS

Have an agressive Lab/Golden mix male adult

Recommended Posts

If it was genuine, hopefully the person would have come back. It has a lot of hallmarks of not being genuine, like logging out after posting and never *apparently* coming back and having the same username as a user at the site lunaticoutpost.com (as pointed out by another person, that comes up in an internet search. Coincidence? I doubt it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well, I for one, read "135 lb lab" and started to laugh - what? not 150 lbs??

In all fairness the post said "Lab Mix". Possibly mixed with elephant?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was no joke and I posted twice because it didn't post as I thought. New poster Got an email helping me out.I apologize.

Working things out with the Lab he has come a long ways just does not tolerate puppies. I keep them separate inside unless I supervise, outside they are fine. Working it out. Also had no responses so I thought I would check back in a couple days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Working things out with the Lab he has come a long ways just does not tolerate puppies. I keep them separate inside unless I supervise, outside they are fine. Working it out.

That's good to hear. Inside, if you feel there is enough risk, you simply might want to set things up so they are always separated, maybe using secure baby gates to keep them in different rooms but no one feeling totally "shut out".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Sue that's what we are doing. I spend time each day sitting with the big boy and letting the BC run around. Its starting to work out. Her safety is priority.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI yes he does log in at 135 just took him to the vets. Can't photo bucket a picture Here He is not a fat 135. Just big send you a picture if you still don't believe it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad to hear you're working on it.

I can only reiterate my earlier post. You painted a very alarming picture - a lab the size of a timber wolf who wants to eat your pup, and you're asking when she'll be able to "handle herself" against this dog. :blink: The answer to that is: Never.

Therefore I hope you take zero chances or you may end up with a maimed or dead young dog. Please pay heed to the puppy as well, and don't let it harass the older dogs. I said the rest in my original reply, quoted below.

Best of luck.


~ Gloria


You've posted twice in the Ask an Expert section with variations of this question. Perhaps Eileen could move this post for you, but I'm concerned about the scenario you describe.

First, this "demanding" pup should not be allowed to pester your older dogs until they feel compelled to correct her. Their job is not to raise the pup. That's your job. Your older dogs need "safe areas" where she can't reach them and privacy whenever they desire it.

You can't force dogs to be friends or pals, and if they don't like each other, then you must manage the situation.

The answer to your question though, has already been given. She will NEVER be able to "handle herself" against a dog who weighs more than I do and who wants to "kill her."

If the antipathy is to the point of physical danger, you've already crossed the line of that dog's tolerance. You can't un-make that level of dislike. You can only manage it and assure that everyone else in your household strictly follows the same guidelines. They may require being kept separate their entire lives. Or perhaps when she matures, he'll learn some tolerance, but you absolutely must - I can't stress this enough - control and manage your pup's level of exuberance and rowdiness with your other dogs. If she's not being fair to them, if she's annoying and bothersome, remove her and give them peace. Do that for as long as it takes.

Otherwise, it's like expecting a room full of adults to tolerate a screaming child romping around the house. Be fair to your grown dogs. Manage the pup. And do not expect your big male to ever like her enough to be trusted with her. The results of complacency could be bloody and tragic.

Wishing you well,

Gloria

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being very careful. We had this problem with our other female she is a coonhound rotti mix. She looks like a longhaired Gordon Setter. Very beautiful. Unexpectedly he went after her a couple times when she was a puppy so we kept them separate without supervision till she was 6 months. She now controls him very well he is actually scared of her because her growls are so intimidating but she would never attack or bite she is all about intimidation. So our BC puppy got a taste of his teeth it wasn't bad but still reason for concern. Just a scratch on her face. I realize they are smart dogs and she really wants to test her boundaries with him so its a complete supervision inside. Outside they are fine. Our other female and the BC get along great. as well as the terrier. Just the giant lab/golden mix. he is the only problem. when I say he wants to kill her he could easily. I know that from experience it will work out I was just wondering at what age does a female border collie show the instincts and knowledge to understand signs. A lazy big dog should not be a problem for her but at what age will that occur our other female it was 6 months if he got aggressive she would flee and then turn and scold him it took few times but it was over at that point.. Our Female does look out and mother The BC puppy and that includes scolding. We got her at 5 weeks so she never really had interactions she needed as an infant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being very careful. ..... Outside they are fine. Our other female and the BC get along great. as well as the terrier. Just the giant lab/golden mix. he is the only problem. when I say he wants to kill her he could easily. I know that from experience it will work out I was just wondering at what age does a female border collie show the instincts and knowledge to understand signs. A lazy big dog should not be a problem for her but at what age will that occur our other female it was 6 months if he got aggressive she would flee and then turn and scold him it took few times but it was over at that point.. Our Female does look out and mother The BC puppy and that includes scolding. We got her at 5 weeks so she never really had interactions she needed as an infant.

 

 

Do not expect your BC to behave like your other female. She's a different dog and a different breed. We can't say at what age your BC pup will learn to read your big male's warning signs, but the point we're trying to make is this:

 

She should not have to.

 

What if she never does learn to avoid him? What if she were to try appeasement behaviors to make him happy, and he still turned on her and hurt her? If she came to you that young and missed important puppy social skills, she may never learn to read other dogs exactly right. I've known several border collies who will only respond to other dogs' aggressive displays by crawling closer, trying to lick them and acting submissive towards them. That sort of thing could get them killed, if they were facing a truly vicious dog.

 

Keep your pup and your big male apart. Period. Don't wait for her to learn to "handle herself" around him. Don't wait for him to make an attempt at hurting her and then try to fix it, because she may lack the social skills and reaction time to save herself. If he's dangerous, it's YOUR job to keep her safe. Period. Forever. The end. Don't look for her to take care of herself. Again, that's not her job. It's yours.

 

It only takes one instant of misjudgement and you'll be facing a tragedy.

 

Best of luck.

 

~ Gloria

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope you take to heart what Gloria is saying. You've got a pack of dogs. Things escalate in a heartbeat with a pack of dogs. Your dogs should NOT be expected to handle it and you should not be letting them. You're the one in charge, You're the one to keep the older dog from being harassed and the young one from getting killed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you ever had your Lab/golden mix tested for thyroid issues?

 

Low thyroid can contribute to overweight in dogs (and that dog is clearly overweight), and it can also cause aggression in dogs.

 

If it were my dog, I'd be sending a blood sample to Dr. Jean Dodds at HemoPet for analysis. She specializes in thyroid testing and will give a more accurate review than many local vets, who aren't always up on thyroid issues. http://www.hemopet.org/hemolife-diagnostics/veterinary-thyroid-testing.html

 

You pup is beautiful!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea he just had a vet check up with him. He is just a monster size oddly. Vet worries a little about his rear hips because he is so muscular top heavy in front. He is on a special diet. and gets a lot of exercise. .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But did the vet check include a thyroid blood panel being run?

 

Far too many vets don't even consider running thyroid panels, and too few of the ones who do think to do it know how to read them properly.

 

I've seen several dogs where an inexpensive thyroid pill has changed their behavior for the better. That may not be the case here, but it's definitely worth exploring, imo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to chime in and second what Gloria said.

No dog, of any age or breed, should ever be expected to learn to "handle himself" against an aggressive larger dog (or, for that matter, an aggressive smaller dog).

You will always and forever need to keep these dogs apart unless you want to end up with tension, behavior problems, fear, and potential tragedy.

Just sayin'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to chime in and second what Gloria said.

No dog, of any age or breed, should ever be expected to learn to "handle himself" against an aggressive larger dog (or, for that matter, an aggressive smaller dog).

You will always and forever need to keep these dogs apart unless you want to end up with tension, behavior problems, fear, and potential tragedy.

Just sayin'.

He will Not always be aggressive its just the puppy stage. Just inside look at the pic I sent out side. They get along just fine. http://s1058.photobucket.com/user/hjtras/media/DSCF0783_zps2b93e735.jpg.html?filters[user]=131348800&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Keep your pup and your big male apart. Period. Don't wait for her to learn to "handle herself" around him. Don't wait for him to make an attempt at hurting her and then try to fix it, because she may lack the social skills and reaction time to save herself. If he's dangerous, it's YOUR job to keep her safe. Period. Forever. The end. Don't look for her to take care of herself. Again, that's not her job. It's yours.

 

It only takes one instant of misjudgement and you'll be facing a tragedy.

 

 

'Nuff said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'Nuff said.

knowing your dogs is important. so yes outside is fine. inside not there yet. not to my comfort level at all. so inside they are kept separate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea he just had a vet check up with him. He is just a monster size oddly. Vet worries a little about his rear hips because he is so muscular top heavy in front. He is on a special diet. and gets a lot of exercise. .

 

The photos you show are not very clear as far as seeing his body, but in them he looks significantly overweight. I wonder if his hips are making him a little grumpy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The photos you show are not very clear as far as seeing his body, but in them he looks significantly overweight. I wonder if his hips are making him a little grumpy?

Would not argue he may have some issues with weight. But his temperament issues are only with puppies. He his fantastic with kids and people. He has no issues at all with humans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...