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Unenthusiastic Puppy

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I went to Scotland to pickup both Cheeta and Rei(the merles) Cheeta is an already trained sheepdog and did hillwork.

 

Just wondering why you chose to buy Astra dogs when you could have gone to the same trouble of importing and got dogs from tried and tested lines if you wanted to breed working line dogs.

 

Astra dogs are sport dogs. There may be a few that can work after a fashion but are they honestly taken seriously in the working world?

 

If you want to breed sport dogs, just say so.

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There is a now DNA test for canine epilepsy that has been worked on and tested, it is only a matter of time before it will be available here in the US.. So yes color genetics are neat but by all means it is not the only thing, I guess it isn't apparent from others that do not know me or the work I have researched.

You understand that the research you are referring to is for one specific "type" of epilepsy in another breed. The markers were present in the affected dogs and not present in the unaffected dogs. When an evaluation was performed on a small number for border collies the same correlation was found. They have not proven these markers (mutations) cause epilepsy, yet.

 

Mark

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I have done the research on what traits genetics came into play to develop the perfect herding dog. Crouch from Spaniel breeds, Eye from Pointer/Setter breeds herd/chase originating from wolves.

Do you really think what makes a good stock dog comes down to 4 simple genetic traits: herding instinct, eye, crouch, and tail set (from your website)?

 

BTW I too take offense at your broad generalization on how we raise our litters and feel about our dogs (teammates, partners, "right hand man", etc). Have you ever seen all the dog beds in my house?????

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To the OP -- You may be overwhelming the puppy, you may be doing "too much" or she may just be a late bloomer.

 

Secret was similar as a puppy, except she was at least food motivated. I did a lot of clicker training with her and she thrived on it -- I typically used kibble as her main reward because it's all she needed. I rewarded very rapid-fire -- frequent and often to keep her playing the game. If she got frustrated because I took too big of a step forward or asked for too much she would disconnect and stop playing the game with me.

 

Meanwhile I kept trying to build her interest in playing with me (with toys, without toys, anything!). I didn't have much success, so I kept going back to where we did have success -- more clicker work. More or less I just kept completely killing any play drive by asking for more and more "work" in the form of trick training. She figured that she didn't have to play with me because eventually I'd give her what she wanted -- food. FYI, she *did* play with other dogs, just not with me.

 

When it came time for her to start agility foundations I was so frustrated. I couldn't turn her on to it at all. I eventually brought the clicker into that work, but it just made her slow and thoughtful.

 

Eventually I just abandoned all training and focused on getting her to play. We didn't have the type of relationship I wanted, so I worked on building that and making stuff "fun" for us and not so serious all the time. I had been SO proud of having the "perfectly well behaved" puppy that knew a million tricks, but along the way we just never learned to be goofy together.

 

I'm going to do things differently with my next puppy. I'll potty train it, obviously, but beyond that I don't plan to do anything but play with it the first year. Who needs manners? I want drive. Manners are easy to teach. Drive is easy to stifle and kill.

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Hi LittleFoxx,

 

You said:

 

I do not have access to sheep but I do back up puppies that were sold for work. Every one can herd and work on a farm. I also have a 4 page contract that I sign stating this..

NO I do NOT trial. I absolutely do not have time to travel around to trials living on an actual WORKING farm..

 

But yet,

 

I went to Scotland to pickup both Cheeta and Rei(the merles)

<snip>

she came from B24 Ranch in KS. (look up their website if you must but they also work their dogs, I watched them work before buying her.)

 

I am not sure whether you traveled to Kansas to watch them work, but it sounds like it? Or maybe you watched a video. At any rate, if you are able to travel to Scotland, perhaps you could make similar farmsitting arrangements for a day or two at a time to break away to a trial now and then.

 

 

It is my fault I don't put enough emphasis on the website that my dogs work

 

<snip>

 

time/work is most certainly a factor in going/participating in trials. I am the major caretaker of ALL the animals as well as my son. I do not have any hired hands here and my husband is at work until 6PM+ everyday. So between kidding, bottle calves, training and taking my son to his activities I have no idea how I would have time to trial, but by all means if anyone wants to handle one of my dogs and take them to trial, be my guest!

 

Perhaps you could post videos on your website of your dogs working. It only seems fair to potential puppy buyers that if you say your dogs work and it's something that you consider to be a selling point, that you have some means of showing what quality of work your dogs are capable of.

 

You're right I guess I am in the dark when it comes to the value of herding trials. While I have been to several opens and nursery trials (only in Scotland, Wales and other parts of the UK) I do not place trial abilities on the top of my priorities when raising my dogs and my puppies.

 

As others have said, there are good working dogs who are not trial dogs. However, getting your dogs out to a trial is putting your money (or your time) where your mouth is. You are showing your regional "neighbors" (in sheepdogging) just what your dogs are capable of under unfamiliar conditions. Also already said (but also worth repeating)...somehow, many full-time farmers/ranchers/shepherds do manage to get to a few trials during the year.

 

You said you've seen some trials in the UK, so I'm sure you have some idea of what's being asked of the dogs. Great news! One of the best trials in the country, the Bluegrass Classic, is in your area this week! Maybe you could break away to go watch a day of the top dogs (or even of the Novice dogs), and ask yourself where your dogs' working ability fits in compared to the dogs in the trial. It may help answer your question about the "value" of trials. Bluegrass Classic

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On your website, you refer to "Luci is our White with Black Split face girl. She comes from AWESOME International lines. She has many many International Herding Champs all the way down her fathers side and several down her mothers as well."

I searched and finally found her pedigree off of a Dallas photo as the one linked to her photo is of Angel: http://www.littlefoxxfarms.com/uploads/Luci.pdf

I found 4 Nat. or Int. Ch in the first 4 generations but WOW the 6th & 7th generation had a dozen! However you list many of them incorrectly; some are Reserve Int. Ch, some are Driving CH, some are Int.Shepherds Ch. I am guessing there was no intent to misrepresent, just perhaps a lack of understanding the subtleties of sheepdog trials. It is a good pedigree but 'awesome' would be one with all those super dogs a LOT closer; like one,2 or 3 generations back.

I have a nice bitch whose sire is a Canadian National CH, her damn is sired by a Reserve USBCHA CH and also a USBCHA Nat.Ch in 3rd generation. Going back another generation is a Scot.CH and Int.Sup. CH - Johnny Wilson's Spot(who is in many pedigrees). I would classify that as a 'nice' pedigree not awesome, but a whole lot more impressive than your Luci. I don't even know or care who is in her 5th or 6th generations....it has such little influence.

regards Lani

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I found 4 Nat. or Int. Ch in the first 4 generations but WOW the 6th & 7th generation had a dozen! However you list many of them incorrectly; some are Reserve Int. Ch, some are Driving CH, some are Int.Shepherds Ch. I am guessing there was no intent to misrepresent, just perhaps a lack of understanding the subtleties of sheepdog trials. It is a good pedigree but 'awesome' would be one with all those super dogs a LOT closer; like one,2 or 3 generations back.

regards Lani

 

Lani, I think your thoughts here may bear striking similarities to another thread where the advertiser was also involved with the Astra kennel. Coincidence?

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Ok, in all seriousness this will have to be the last time I respond here. I am not a "forum" type person, I just don't have the time to sit and watch a thread all day for comments addressed to me. As you can see I have been a "member" of this for a couple yrs but these are my first posts...

 

Not only that but to address me in another persons question seems wrong/off topic? Feel free to email me though if there is anything else I can help out or address if anyone has concerns.

 

@ mum24dogs

I personally don't have a problem with Astra dogs. I went to Scotland to get a couple dogs. Janet was kind enough to take me around to several open and nursery trials across Scotland and the UK that she was running her dogs in. I don't see how she is breeding agility/sport dogs as her dogs are all Sheepdogs and are trained for such on her flock of Dorper Sheep. She holds training clinics to start dogs on sheep. I have NEVER seen or known her to run any type of agility or dog sports with her dogs. Perhaps lots of people that buy her dogs run them in agility? I don't know much about agility people/dogs, I personally don't have time to be competitive in dog agility.

Cheeta (already has training) was bred to Dale (the boy who placed 6th/30+ at his first nursery trial I was at) I kept a male out of this litter and I couldn't be more please with him. He already does great with the goats at 6months.

This is just my personal experience with the "Astra" dogs.

 

 

@ Mark

I said it was only a matter of time before there would be a test available for the US. I did not say there is one now. I don't know why you are being negative about it. I for one am all for the research and development of an epilepsy test as it hits close to home for me. I have both and aunt and uncle with epilepsy and one of my BC's(not my lines) died from a grand mal seizure due to epilepsy. So yes they may have not proven the markers for BC's yet but my goodness the more research and development done on the subject the closer we will get to being able to monitor and wipe it out of our beloved BC breed.

 

@ Mark again..

No WHERE does it say I think there are only 4 genetic traits for a good stock dog.... it says (and this is taken direct from my site on a page that has not been updated for at least 2yrs..)

 

""The other behavior traits that make a Border Collie have a lot to do with the origins. What type of dog that went into making the Border Collie breed. The problem that lies in here is that, for the exact right traits we need a happy medium. We wouldn't want a Border Collie that has so much Eye the he freezes, or so little or so much power that he can't move the herd or goes in so strong that he scatters them.

I don't know the exact Alleles for each of these traits, I know that there are quite a few that go into each trait. I will list the ones that I do know and I will add more as I learn them.""

 

 

I specifically stated I don't know the exact Alleles and that there are quiet a few.. not 4... I also said I would list the ones I know and add more as I learn..

The research I had read over was:

Scott, J. P., & Fuller, J. L.

"Genetics and the Social Behaviour of the Dog"

Burns, M and Fraser, M.N.

"Genetics of the Dog. The Basis of Successful Breeding."

Kelley, R.B.

"Sheep Dogs. Their Breeding, Maintenance and Training."

Burns, M.

"The Mutual Behaviour of Sheep and Sheepdogs in Ghana."

 

Maybe I had "dumbed" it down a bit too much as others have suggested in the past, I did write that a couple years ago and hadn't really gotten a chance to go into more depth and update the website. But by all means I never said that was only 4 simple traits if anything I said there was more then just the herding instinct that makes up a good sheepdog and that I would list what I had found out so far..

 

@ Mark..

I said my generalizations were based on the breeders and trialers overseas.. You will find that a large portion of shepherds there feel their dogs are merely tools. While they may care for the dog at the end of the day they are still a tool to help them get the job done. Like I said the dogs and the handlers were great to watch they are much different then over here.

 

@ Megan

 

I went to Scotland last fall by my self and my husband stayed home with everyone, in which he had to take time off for work.

We took a family vacation 2 yrs ago to go to KS (which was only 4 days). It was our vacation since it is quite costly to get someone to take care of everyone while we are away.

 

Lexington is approx. 7hrs away from me which would require more then just a one day trip. But in all seriousness I would like to go to trials around here (NE Ohio) I'm not even sure where/when the closest one would be, but if it's less then a couple hrs drive I most certainly would go.

 

I know many full time rancher/farmers go, the biggest problem for me is I am on a SMALL farm there is only me, my son and my husband. The later two require more work the animals do!!! :lol: (the smiley thing is kind of neat)

 

Really though I am not trying to avoid it or make excuses I am all the willing to go with in my means.

 

 

@ Lani

 

I guess awesome is in the eyes of the beholder. Luci is my baby I love her more then one can imagine. She is such an amazing girl not just in working abilities but personality and intelligence too. I guess I should add "I think" to my opinions on my dogs.

I did know the titles had other prefixes in front, the generation software had very limited space. Also I was not sure if that was a major point needed when listing pedigree info. If it is I will try and find a better software that allows me to fill in all the details.

 

@ Journey

 

Luci is in NO way related to an Astra dog or Astra kennels. Her lines are from Wales, well at least a portion of it.

 

@ Smalahundur

 

So I take it not a single person on this board runs their BC in agility? Because as far as I know the dog sports are done by the AKC? Like I said, I don't think the herding/working ability of the BC should be lost but I am not going to demonize those who do sports with their BC's....

If that is considered a red flag so be it.

 

*edited to add a response to Smalahundur*

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Has puppy been to the vet yet? With the weekend, maybe not, but I'm curious to know if anything was found.

 

For only having brought home your puppy under two months ago, I think you are expecting too much in the training department. As others have said, back off a bit and just have fun. New things can be scary for a puppy (or even an adult). Nearly everything in the world is still new to your young puppy. With each new experience she's learning what is good and what is bad, what is 'safe' and what is not. That in itself can be stressful and tiring.

 

Having to learn all these new words and behaviors on top of all that is probably just too much for her. Especially if you aren't completely sure what you are doing in training her (which it sounds like it). You're likely just confusing her at times which may be why she learns some things quickly, but lacks interest in others. (Don't feel too bad, every trainer has confused their dog at some point.) Read more about clicker training and find a GOOD trainer that really knows clicker training (if that's what you want to use) to teach you how to properly use the clicker and to help you with your timing.

 

Finding the right trainer is important. I take classes with a few trainers. Our agility trainer does not use clicker training...she's not a bad trainer; she just uses other methods (luring, targeting, verbal markers). I like the clicker (and so does my dog), but I had to learn from another trainer how to utilize it properly and effectively. It takes practice to get your timing right.

 

So like others have said, let your puppy just be a puppy. She's learning all the time already, even when you don't realize it. Also, when you do train, keep your sessions really short. One successful sit with a big reward and then time to think afterward can be so much more productive than 5-10 boring repetitions, especially if she's not all that interested in the first place ("why should I sit when you're just going to make me do it again and again?").

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Here is a link to the correct pedigree for Johnny Wilson's Spot: http://www.angelfire.com/nd2/dimond-s/Spot_pedigree.htm

 

Make a note that ## could be listed all by itself and it means Int.Sup.CH as well a single # means National CH. There is one for USBCHA which is a * I think. Others should be specified. Calling the Reserve(second place) dog the Int.Sup. CH (first place) is fairly obvious why that would be incorrect and completely misleading. Same with a Brace CH or Driving CH or simply 'member' of Nat.team. All important accomplishments as well.

You might note that Angel's sire, a Quantum Leap? Blue, only has an ASCA Herding Started title which meaningless for a Border Collie and his CH is for conformation.

I am sure your Luci is awesome...but as a breeder and on a website you should be making claims that are more correct and not misleading, however unintentional or just your opinion(s).

regards Lani

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@ Smalahundur

 

So I take it not a single person on this board runs their BC in agility? Because as far as I know the dog sports are done by the AKC? Like I said, I don't think the herding/working ability of the BC should be lost but I am not going to demonize those who do sports with their BC's....

If that is considered a red flag so be it.

 

*edited to add a response to Smalahundur*

 

 

Oh absolutely there are members who run agility. The difference though is that they Do.Not.Breed them. Many of the top running BC's come from *proven* working stock. Sure there are exceptions but that's what they are - exceptions.

 

I'm glad you are responding and engaging in the conversation!

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@ Smalahundur

 

So I take it not a single person on this board runs their BC in agility? Because as far as I know the dog sports are done by the AKC? Like I said, I don't think the herding/working ability of the BC should be lost but I am not going to demonize those who do sports with their BC's....

If that is considered a red flag so be it.

 

 

I don´t run in agility no, I got into border collies because I have sheep. Doesn´t mean I don´t think it is one of the coolest dog sports around(but as has been said in this topic, sport accomplishments should not be a parameter in border collie breeding).

 

But all that is irrelevant for the remarks I made, as I only commented on the value you put on looks and color in your breeding program.

 

Talking about that breeding program, in one of your first posts in this topic you offer your dogs for trial training. I wouldn´t take one of your pups for free; my time is too precious to take a chance on a product from a breeder with your priorities...

 

Edit, dug up the quote:

So between kidding, bottle calves, training and taking my son to his activities I have no idea how I would have time to trial, but by all means if anyone wants to handle one of my dogs and take them to trial, be my guest!

Apart from the good old "I´d be churning out "open" dogs if I could just find the time to train and trial my precious talented topdogs..."you were actually offering generously if someone would like to take the trouble and train and trial your dogs for you if i am not mistaken. In my neck of the woods you pay for such a service (having a handler train your dog for you).

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Since I have only been trialing three years I thought I might gently add something.

 

I am a full time farmer.

 

I trial when I can because it is great fun, a swell bunch of helpful people and it has helped me with my own stockdog issues.

I have seen a couple of merle dogs at trials, and red dogs and a couple of nice kelpies and a couple of australian shepherds.

 

No one was weird to them at all. Everyone was kind and was in my opinion hoping each run was sucessful.

 

But the most interesting thing I have learned in trialing.

 

Is it is not about winning, it is about learning.

 

And keeping our partners working with us into the next century.

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I'm sorry I've been staying out of this because there are far more experienced people on this board than I, but I just have to add:

1- I was a farm kid. I'm rather confused how a "small" farm keeps you busier than a big farm. Could you expand on this please? If large farmers have the time to trial, how do you not?

2- edited- Nevermind. It's been rehashed plenty of times.

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I'm sorry I've been staying out of this because there are far more experienced people on this board than I, but I just have to add:

1- I was a farm kid. I'm rather confused how a "small" farm keeps you busier than a big farm. Could you expand on this please? If large farmers have the time to trial, how do you not?

2- edited- Nevermind. It's been rehashed plenty of times.

 

How many people take care of a large farm? If one person leaves/goes out of town is there another person to help out/ take their place?

 

For my family only 2 adults; my husband (who works elsewhere) and me live here along with my 5yr old son.

 

If I leave for more then a day that means my husband has to take off work.

 

As I said if there are trials nearby within a couple hrs drive I would love to know so I can go!

At the very least to see everything, meet other BC's and new people.

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Hi Little Foxx,

 

AKC is only one of many organizations that sanction dog sports, such as Agility. There are also a good many sports that AKC does not sanction at all, such as Musical Freestyle, Trieball, Flyball, etc.

 

There are some people who chose to participate in AKC and only AKC sanctioned events, but there are a good many who participate exclusively in other venues, as well. Pretty much anything offered by the AKC is offered by another organization, if not many others.

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1337048609[/url]' post='417242']

How many people take care of a large farm? If one person leaves/goes out of town is there another person to help out/ take their place?

 

For my family only 2 adults; my husband (who works elsewhere) and me live here along with my 5yr old son.

 

If I leave for more then a day that means my husband has to take off work.

 

As I said if there are trials nearby within a couple hrs drive I would love to know so I can go!

At the very least to see everything, meet other BC's and new people.

 

 

 

My mom worked full time. My father worked more than 3000 acres by himself with help from his 2 kids. He still had time to drive me 6 hours almost every weekend (one way) so that I could pursue my soccer goals. Every one of our neighbors had a similar story. VERY few farms are "industrial" farms with many workers. When we needed extra help or were going to be gone for a bit, our neighbors looked after our farm, and we did the same for them. All it took was a quick phone call. Hobby farms, as it sounds like you have, do not require near as much attention. You simply will not be able to convince me you have no time. If you have time to breed, you have time to trial.

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Although I haven't been replying to everybody, I am considering the suggestions. Thanks for the different perspectives on training and the stories about your dogs- those really give me an idea of what I can expect. We are still trying different things out to see if Rikki responds but I am letting up my expectations for her and I'm not going to bother with commands that aren't vital.

 

I'm going to do things differently with my next puppy. I'll potty train it, obviously, but beyond that I don't plan to do anything but play with it the first year. Who needs manners? I want drive. Manners are easy to teach. Drive is easy to stifle and kill.

 

Ok, at least I'm doing that right- Rikki looooves to play with us. Playing was actually the first thing we worked on getting her understand. However, I have to disagree with not needing manners. She can't be allowed to continuously stop on her walks, pull us, steal my shoes, or any number of things that require commands such as "drop it" "leave it" etc.

 

I don't see how its going to get easier to train her if I let her get away with things we don't want her to do later. The things that we worked on consistently no matter how much it seemed she wouldn't react are the things she knows well now (come and sit). She knows that to get outside of the gate she must sit once inside and once outside, and she's started doing this without a problem.

 

She did a bit better in obedience class yesterday, and I let her rest for a while when she tuned out. I'm considering leaving most of the training to be done at obedience class so we are not having to stress her at home.

 

There are just some things she has to learn early on in order to have a functional home.

 

The inclusion of new food into her diet is helping with the food motivation, and we've started "playing" with her food (throwing it for her to chase- It's much more exciting to her that way so thanks to whoever suggested this). We fed her salmon tonight (our order of premade raw hasn't arrived yet) and she was FINALLY showing some excitement. I've never been so happy to see a dog jumping up at the counters :rolleyes:

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Hello Little Foxx,,

 

There is an upcoming sheepdog trial that should be fairly close to you on July 6 - July 8, 2012 The trial will be held at Rush Creek Farm near Sidney, OH, and the hosts are Bruce and Linda Fogt, the publishers of The Working Border Collie magazine. You can contact them at [email protected] for more information.

 

If you are able to attend the trial, please spend some time watching the dogs competing in the Open class. Most of us involved with working Border Collies feel that if a Border Collie hasn't achieved that level of training and isn't capable of that level of work, it should not be bred.

 

Also, please feel free to talk with the handlers, although you won't hear them using terms like "Very High Herding Drive" and "Off Switch" (those terms are used by the hobby herders and other dog sports enthusiasts).

 

In her post, Tea wrote:

 

"But the most interesting thing I have learned in trialing.

 

Is it is not about winning, it is about learning."

 

These are truly words of wisdom, and no matter how long we have been training and trialing, there is always more to learn.

 

Regards,

nancy

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Has puppy been to the vet yet? With the weekend, maybe not, but I'm curious to know if anything was found.

 

No, but we are still considering it. Now that Rikki is showing more energy with the changes made to her diet, I am doubtful she has a non-nutrition related health issue. I have looked up the tests recommended by people (blood work, fecal test)and what they can show and whether they are usually done for puppies that are not obviously ill. I'm still open to the idea if someone can clarify exactly what the benefits are. From my understanding, fecal test would show parasites (she is on heart work preventative) and Sonya (from Little Foxx Farms) would have already had her tested before sending her to me. Her stools are normal now (no more constipation). I read that blood work used to get a baseline isn't done until they are older.

Again, I'm still open to the vet visit, I just want to know why specifically. Our vet did not offer these tests when she got her shots and physical done. (And it's expensive)

 

 

("why should I sit when you're just going to make me do it again and again?").

 

This is exactly what she was thinking. :rolleyes: No wonder she wasn't going along with it.

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OK, let me see if I have this correct.

 

Four days ago, you asked advice for a puppy that might be illness, lack of energy and abnormal behavior for a pup of that age. Most of the people suggested a vet visit.

 

You are not going because of cost?

 

You want us to clarify the benefits of why you need to take your pup to the vet?

 

Seriously?

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My mom worked full time. My father worked more than 3000 acres by himself with help from his 2 kids. He still had time to drive me 6 hours almost every weekend (one way) so that I could pursue my soccer goals. Every one of our neighbors had a similar story. VERY few farms are "industrial" farms with many workers. When we needed extra help or were going to be gone for a bit, our neighbors looked after our farm, and we did the same for them. All it took was a quick phone call. Hobby farms, as it sounds like you have, do not require near as much attention. You simply will not be able to convince me you have no time. If you have time to breed, you have time to trial.

 

That's wonderful to hear =) I'm not trying to convince you at all (nor anyone else for that matter) It's painfully obvious from the responses which are constructive criticism and which are not.

 

We don't have nearly that much land but again I don't raise crops other then what's consumed by my family. I have animals, not all of which a 5yr old can be expected to safely tend to.

 

Daily(some twice per day) there are dairy goats (I have 20 or so but the number varies during/after kidding) that are milked, eggs to be collected, bottle feeding calves, turning out the horses in the AM rounding them up and stall them in the PM, feeding everyone and of course providing the prey diet(not trying to go into graphic details..) and daily work/activity for the BC's. There is not a neighbor around that is willing to do that kind of work for free.

To me it's a lot of work, but I love it and I knew the sacrifices that came with it (IE: not being able to leave for more then a day or so without making arrangements)

 

I guess it can be considered a "hobby farm" as I do not make a huge profit, really any that I do goes right back into the care/wellbeing/enrichment of the animals.

 

You can keep telling me until the cows come home (yes, I thought this was funny)that it's possible to make time, but in if it would sacrifice the care/wellbeing of any one of my animals or my husband and son I simply will not do it.

 

 

@ Lani thanks for the info

 

@ Journey I understand your point (although I don't personally believe that a dog worth breeding is only related to stock work- and NO I am NOT referring to a dogs visual appearance at all)

 

@ Tea Thank you very much your comment definitely paints trialing in a different light =)

 

@ Root Beer I honestly did not know that other venues had the same activities/sports as AKC, that is good to know!

 

@ Nancy a 4hr drive is doable. Thank you for letting me know as it is far enough in advance to make minor arrangements to try and at least make one day of the trials.

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@ Anna reguarding Rikki as I never really got a chance to address the original problem..

 

(pending any actual health issues)

 

While all dogs have their own personality(specially BC's), for the most part the BC's I raised as puppies all learned from experiences and watching more than any type of strict formal training. Strict/formal type training can be boring and/or overwhelming to them. Specially ones that are not food motivated.. I think it is harder to motivate a raw fed pup as it already gets the best for it's meals so why should it work for a piece of cheese/hot dog.

The very best food reward I have used is dehydrated/freeze dried liver (if you make your own sprinkle anise on it beforehand, that makes it 100times more appealing to them)

The clicker I mailed out to you with everything should have had instructions (they are printed in the inside of the cardboard part) she already knew that click ment she did something right and was rewarded (sometimes liver-sometimes just a scratch/pet as she was very affectionate) come,stay,sit,down were all things I worked on but I would do them as we were playing outside. You can incorporate all sorts of things while playing without any specific training at all.

 

By playing I mean running around with her siblings, chasing her toys and my other BC's, stalking Sasuke, (I think you've seen the posted videos of her playing before she came home?)oh and she loooved to climb out of that x-pen... She had free run of the property (while I was outside and obviously not where the livestock is) Since she was the last to go home (because we waited until after Easter to fly her) she probably received more freedom/attention then the other pups.

 

I whistle a lot for commands, perhaps you can try that with Rikki.

 

Other than that the only thing I can think of is, I'm on a farm with more land and less noise then a suburban area. While I did take her and all the pups to several outings, if you are putting her in a dog/public park type setting, at this age it just might be too stimulating for her to see all that's going on and be expected to walk properly on a leash.

Although I have had some trouble makers most always a BC pup follows right along without being attached to a leash (obviously if this is not a safe/practical option for you, don't do it) but getting them to focus on you, your guidance/enthusiasm/confidence definitely helps without the need for a leash.

 

(Luci is 100% at staying right by my side on trail walks or rides but the second I clip a leash on her she tends to wander, pull, stop etc. I have no idea why she does this..

A little girl once came up to us as we were heading back to the car and asked if she could "walk" her. Sure enough Luci followed that little girl around while she was holding the leash. The second I had the leash back again she was pulling to go to the car.. Such a brat!! or bad training on my part maybe but at least I know she is perfect off lead and obviously understands the "concept" of a leash!)

 

I guess that really isn't relevant other then some dogs are better off leash then on.

 

I wish I knew exactly what you are trying to get from her and could tell you a sure fix or at least the reason why she is behaving the way she is. She was definitely an energetic, driven and smart little pup here in this environment, not only that but she was really affectionate too.

 

I'm hoping with the added liver/organ meat to her diet(where a large portion of the nutrients and vitamins needed come from) She will start to pick back up energy and attention wise.

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