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I've been indoctrinate with AKC and USDAA agility from the get go. That's what available in my area, that is the only thing we train for(actually the only trainers in my area are AKC and USDAA competitors/judge), that is what we do. Err it actually more AKC then USDAA but the ideas are pretty similar so... shrug...

 

I saw some nadac agility and even secrete(hope she doesn't mind the reference?!)I national run among other. And it had me really scratching my head in confusion.

 

How are the venues in comparison to AKC and usdaa?

Is there faults?

What are the cut off for heights?

How are you judged?

Why didn't some course have jumps?

Why is nadac more sending? Is it more points the father out you are? Is it more like gambler/fast?

What are the course times like?

Is it competitive?

How do you advance?

Is there an equivalent title to the MACH? Lol my usdaa terms are shaky at best but I think theirs is an MAD?!

 

Tbh I have only heard mainly negative things about each venue(nadac, cpr) from those that tried it in my area. Not sure of that's why they are almost non-exsistance in my area... or if they are inexsistance just under the radar?!

 

Lol sorry for bad spelling!

 

And would love to see videos!

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You can find the answers to many of your questions on the web sites of the venues.

 

I've run almost exclusively in NADAC and CPE. The courses in NADAC tend to be very flowing with alot of space between the obstacles. NADAC is perceived to be "easy", but it really is only easy at the lower levels. NADAC favors fast dogs with distance skills. Honestly, I think that people don't like NADAC because their dogs lack the speed and distance skills to Q in elite.

 

At least in my area, the CPE courses tend to be very compressed and it seems like the judges don't use the whole ring. I don't like CPE, but the trials are very close to my house. The times are very generous at all levels.

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I'll answer for CPE since it is the venue that I know best.

 

How are the venues in comparison to AKC and usdaa?

 

Similarities:

 

Almost all standard equipment is used.

A-Frame is slatted, but (I believe) is set slightly lower than AKC height

Dogwalk can be slatted

Down contact rules apply, at least one paw in the yellow, performance must be "safe"

Standard and Jumpers are offered (No weaves in Jumpers)

Standard Course Time set by judge, varies by level

"Enthusiast" is offered, which is like "Preferred" or whatever USDAA calls it, with lower jump heights

Championship Titles offered after completion of regular titles

 

Differences:

 

Tire is set same as jump height

No table in Standard and a table performance is never required

Slatless dogwalk may be used

Jump heights lower than USDAA, but comparable to AKC

Dogs may start at Levels 1, 2, or 3 (but once you Q, you are "locked in" to that track) - there are 5 Levels, plus Championship Level

Level 1 designed for new dog/handler teams - no weaves or teeter

Level 2 is designed for a new dog of a handler with previous experience - weaves and teeter come in

Level 3 is designed for experienced dog and handler teams (But, again, you can choose to start in 1, 2, or 3 no matter what)

GAMES!!! Fullhouse, Jackpot, Wildcard, Colors, Snooker - all extremely fun. Table is used in some games to stop the game, dog only needs to touch the table

"Specialist" is offered with jump heights 8 inches lower than measured heights

 

That's all I can think of right now. I'm sure I will think of more!!

 

Is there faults?

 

Yes. They vary by level and class. In Level 1 Standard, you can knock a bar and still qualify, but in Colors, you cannot qualify at any level if you knock a bar. There are faults for knocked bars, off course, missed contact, and other things. No "refusals", though. That just costs you time.

 

What are the cut off for heights?

 

You could get this info off the CPE website. I know, though, that a 20, 21, and 22 inch dog all measure 20. I know, not very helpful!! I only know for my own.

 

How are you judged?

 

Time, faults, 4 paw safety rule, dog can't eliminate in the ring

 

In games, a table taken too soon can end the run early, and in Snooker there are certain things that stop the game.

 

What are the course times like?

 

It varies from judge to judge. They are not super tight like NADAC. I've NQ'ed for time (a few times, anyway, when Maddie was in a meandering kind of mood!!), especially in games, but I consider times to be reasonable. A consistent, clean Standard run is most likely going to qualify on time.

 

Is it competitive?

 

Yes and no. The people that I know in CPE tend to be more "competitive" toward meeting a personal standard than against each other. In CPE, I have never thought in terms of "beating" another team - other teams aren't even on my radar - I'm there with my dog, not theirs. There are placements, but people don't tend to get hung up on them.

 

But a lot of us have personal goals that we compete to meet. Some people are more "competitive", but that is not the atmosphere at the events.

 

How do you advance?

 

A certain number of Q's per class. In Level 1, it is 2 Q's for Standard and 1 Q per each game. Then you go to Level 2, where it is 4 Q's for Standard, and 2 Q's for each game. Titles are categorized with games in pairs (Wildcard and Colors make up the "Handler Games" title) but you can move up a level in one while not at that level in the other.

 

Is there an equivalent title to the MACH? Lol my usdaa terms are shaky at best but I think theirs is an MAD?!

 

Yes, the C-ATCH. Then there is a C-ATE and Championships for each class. But the C-ATCH is the main one. It takes a ton of Q's. Maddie was about 35 Q's away from her C-ATCH and we were getting "close"!!!

 

And would love to see videos!

 

Here is a video of a Jumpers run. I don't remember if this was Level 2 or Level 3, and that's not me running, although that is my dog!! :lol: I'll hunt up some more later - I think I have a Snooker and a Fullhouse somewhere.

 

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How are the venues in comparison to AKC and usdaa?

Is there faults?

What are the cut off for heights?

How are you judged?

Why didn't some course have jumps?

Why is nadac more sending? Is it more points the father out you are? Is it more like gambler/fast?

What are the course times like?

Is it competitive?

How do you advance?

Is there an equivalent title to the MACH? Lol my usdaa terms are shaky at best but I think theirs is an MAD?!

 

Tbh I have only heard mainly negative things about each venue(nadac, cpr) from those that tried it in my area. Not sure of that's why they are almost non-exsistance in my area... or if they are inexsistance just under the radar?!

 

And would love to see videos!

 

I usually run AKC because that is mostly available in my area, but we do have one local NADAC trial a year. I LOOOVE NADAC. But heck, I just like running with my dog, who loves any type of agility, so am not too particular. I would like to play in USDAA but will not jump my dog at 26" - so if I did play in USDAA, he would be run at a lower jump height.

 

I am not an agility expert, but will give you my POV on your questions. I am sure others may have different opinions and that is OK.

 

NADAC is usually considered more flowing (less severe turns) than AKC so people with long-striding dogs sometimes prefer NADAC. NADAC trials are also set up so that a dog can run up to 5-6 times per day (if you wish) vs. AKC where your dog runs only twice per day, sometimes 3 times if the trial offers FAST or T2B. I hate the down time at an AKC trial, thus preferring the NADAC format - keeps me busy.

 

Not sure what you mean by "how are the venues....?"

Yes, there are faults.

Check the NADAC website for an explanation of faults, jump heights and judging. I find them quite similar to AKC.

Courses without jumps (tunnelers, hoopers) test handling skills vs. whether or not your dog drops a bar. Similar to doing flat work. And also, just darn fun - particularly tunnelers!!

Some courses are designed to test your distance handling skills (i.e. sending), but other courses can be handled with your dog closer to you if you desire. And then there is the option for bonus line points, but that is only if you reach the Elite? level (similar to AKC Excellent) where you are required to handle your dog from as far away as 40-60 feet to achieve points. Pretty awesome to see a successful bonus line run.

Course times similar to AKC times. I am guessing, on average, from 20-25 seconds to 50-60 seconds.

Yes, competitiveness is in the attitude of the handler. Everyone wants to do well, but I have also found more of a "friendliness" at the NADAC trial I attended.

Advancement - see the NADAC website, but essentially, similar to AKC requiring 3 Qs.

NATCH ~~ MACH

 

I am sure there must be some NADAC runs on YouTube.

 

Try it, you'll like it.

 

Jovi

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Umm... Kristine, I can't see the video. It says it's private.

 

 

 

Give me a few and I'll put something in here for the UKC venue.

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Umm... Kristine, I can't see the video. It says it's private.

 

Drat. I can't change it until I get home. I will fix it a bit later.

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For NADAC

----------------------

 

Is there faults?

 

Yes. You can receive faults for knocking bars (5 faults), going off course (10 faults), missing a contact (10 faults) and not doing an obstacle (20 faults). Refusals are not faulted in NADAC -- Per Sharon (NADAC head honcho), the time itself is an obstacle in NADAC, so a refusal simply eats away at time. At the Elite level, often times if your dog has a refusal you will be over time. NADAC is the "fast" venue and speed is required. Not blinding speed by any means, but your dog must be running to make time in Elite. Times for the big dogs (20" & 20"+) are quite tight in the skills classes (jumpers, weavers, tunnelers, touch-n-go).

 

 

What are the cut off for heights?

 

The height chart can be found on the NADAC web site. If you are asking this after watching my videos and seeing that my two big dogs run 16" -- This is because Luke runs as a Veteran (over 7 years old) and Secret runs in Skilled. Skilled allows for a 4" height drop for any dog. I run Secret in Skilled because she was so nervous/tense when we first started that she jumped like crap at 20" (the tallest jump height in NADAC). She'd probably be fine at 20" now, but she as accumulated a lot of points in Skilled and I don't want to start over again in Proficient. Skilled is becoming very popular in NADAC. Agility is not about how high your dog can jump, it's about the teamwork you have together and getting around the course.

 

I bumped Kaiser to Skilled right before Championships because he was diagnosed with luxating patella this summer. Previously he jumped 12" -- He is 14" tall and is the very top of that height class. He's pretty stinking fast now that he's jumping 8". :D

 

How are you judged?

 

A judge stands in the arena, same as every other venue? You are judged from the moment you step into the ring until the moment you leave. You must keep your leash on your dog until the judge releases you with "good luck" and you must leave the ring with your dog on leash. Your dog may not tug or otherwise mouth/play with the leash.

 

Why didn't some course have jumps?

 

NADAC is big on hoops. Hoops are a ground speed obstacle that test your handling skills. Dogs do not tend to target hoops like they do the "big" obstacles, so it requires that you actually draw their path and handle the course. Without hang time in the air, the handler's timing has to be very precise or their dog can go off course in a blink. Many of the super fast border collie handlers really struggle with Hoopers classes because they find it very challenging.

 

Why is nadac more sending? Is it more points the father out you are? Is it more like gambler/fast?

 

No, there are not more points the further out you are -- Unless you are doing Super Stakes at Championships. Or, I suppose, bonus lines if you were watching my videos. I attempt bonus lines with Luke. If you successfully complete a course from behind the line (often the line goes straight across from the first obstacle to the last) then you get a 20 point Q instead of a 10 point Q. Or possibly a 15 point Q if the line was "easier." We've come very, very close but haven't gotten one yet. We try bonus lines for the thrill of it -- Because if I'm going to be honest, I do sometimes get bored with the courses. Doing distance is exhilarating and I enjoy it.

 

Chances is the only class in NADAC that requires distance. Each level runs the same short course (10-14 obstacles), but the distance challenges increase with each level. At Elite, you will have to complete three tests (distance, directional & discrimination) from behind the line. It does require special training to be successful at Chances -- which is very discouraging for many teams who don't have distance trainers in their area. You need a higher level of skill than for the Masters Gamblers classes, for example. I've seen Master Gambles that were on par with a Novice Chances distance test.

 

What are the course times like?

 

Again, I'm pretty sure you can find this in the NADAC rule book. Big dogs more or less have to be doing 5 yps or more in the skills classes -- I think the times in the Regular class are pretty generous. To make time in 20" Elite, your dog has to have efficient turns and be more or less running/jumping in extension. I have a friend who runs a labrador that is considered fast in AKC terms, but she is consistently 2-4 seconds over time in NADAC. She is very frustrated by this.

 

Luke and I struggled for ages to make time in Elite Weavers. He is a very large dog (26") and I didn't think it was possible -- We would always be 2-4 seconds over time. If we had a really, really good run we'd be 0.5 seconds over. When they switched to 24" weaves it helped us a lot, but ultimately I focused on REALLY tightening up his turns, staying in front of him at all costs (using front & blind crosses) and was able to speed up his weaves -- On a longer course, he can now come in 4-6 seconds UNDER time --- So nobody can say, "My dog is not fast enough" and just give up.

 

Is it competitive?

 

I think NADAC is very friendly. Some people might be competitive, but ultimately placements don't count for anything. I don't care where I place in a class -- While first is surely nice, I just care about the Q.

 

How do you advance?

 

If you Qualify in a class three times that is your basic title and you may then move up to the next level (Novice, Open or Elite). OR you may opt to stay in a level to earn extended titles. In Novice, 60 points will net you an Outstanding title, 100 is your Superior. There are special awards for Superior Versatility (Superior titles in all classes) and whatnot. You don't ever have to move up -- You can stay in Novice forever -- Or move an old dog back down.

 

Is there an equivalent title to the MACH? Lol my usdaa terms are shaky at best but I think theirs is an MAD?!

 

In NADAC we earn a NATCH. Skilled participants previously earned a MEDAL, but that was recently changed to NATCH-S to make it easier to understand. To earn a NATCH one must have 23 Q's in Elite Regular and 13 Q's each in Elite Jumpers & Chances. Further, one can earn a Versatility NATCH by getting additional 13 Q's in Weavers, Touch-n-Go and Tunnelers (each). That's a whole lot of Q's. Each subsequent NATCH requires 20 more Regular Q's and 10 more Q's in the other classes.

 

Tbh I have only heard mainly negative things about each venue(nadac, cpr) from those that tried it in my area. Not sure of that's why they are almost non-exsistance in my area... or if they are inexsistance just under the radar?!

 

It varies by region. Ultimately, most AKC people seem VERY anti-NADAC -- often because they struggle to make time. USDAA folks poke fun at NADAC due to the lack of equipment that they feel makes it "real" agility. And that's fine, to each their own. I mean, I won't do AKC or CPE agility and that's my choice. Not everybody has to do everything, but I do draw a line at making fun of it. NADAC handlers have a lot of skills that you simply don't see from competitors in other venues -- And those people will say, "I don't need those skills." That's fine, but you can't deny they are skills nonetheless. We take just as much time (if not more) to develop them as those who spend all their time wrapping their dog around standards.

 

And would love to see videos!

 

Sounds like you already found mine. :D

 

I typed this really fast, hopefully I didn't miss anything....

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Thanks for the explanation!

 

For those who compete in different venues how does the dog compare?

Do they understand the difference? I am thinking those distance runs vs when you run with them. Or those hoops to regular full height? Would you still call them jumps? Or do you teach it like its a new obstacle? Lol is it apparent how little I know outside my venue?

 

:-)I yes I was curious about those jump height because of your videos.

AKC jump cutoffs, are I think 2in above and below the jumps height.

And they have 4,8,12,16,20,24,26 heights

Usdaa cutoffs are the jump height.

And their heights are 8,12,16,22,26. At least I think they have an 8in, performance level?!

Eta:

That was my friend biggest complaint the times. Her dog had placed in akc nationalsI and had a gorgeous run but didn't make time(no dog actually made time). When they complain to the judge, she was surprise the dog didn't make time, and then changed the course time to allow for her dog to make it in?! So out of the whole class only 2 dogs passed because of the time adjustment. :) nice of the judge but how in the world did they wheel the course to get such a impossible time? <- that why I was asking about the times. This was in NADAC

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I started Kaiser in TDAA before NADAC and popped him back and forth a few times. He hated TDAA, though, so I didn't stick around. I have friends, though, who routinely go back and forth between venues without a problem. The dogs don't have an issue at all. One of my friends won HIT at TDAA Nationals and then went to Cynosport two days later and did very well. Doesn't get much different than that.

 

I can use distance and run with my dogs in the same run -- And often time I do mix it up in various ways. If the only time my dogs ever see distance is in Chances, they aren't going to do it well. With Kaiser I use a lot more distance because he has a space bubble and gets nervous if I'm too close to him. He's just quirky. I run more with Secret because she is faster that way, but she has been getting more comfortable with distance over the last few months, so I'll use that to get ahead of her when needed.

 

I don't teach hoops any differently than I teach jumps. Go through it, good dog. Some people name them, I just tell my dog to go. I find it irritating when people sit and go, "Hoop! Hoop! Hoop!" around a course. Of course, I find it equally as irritating to hear, "Jump! Jump! Jump!" Show the dog their path -- they should know to take what is in front of them without hearing the name of the obstacle....

 

NADAC heights are 4", 8", 12" 16" & 20". There is also a 20+ division for dogs that measure over 20" tall, but they still jump 20". You can drop below your measured division by running in Skilled as I mentioned above, or if your dog qualifies for a "breed height exemption" (weight/height ratio, such as with the short-legged and long-backed dogs).

 

I find many AKC and USDAA people to be VERY hung up on jump heights... Jump heights are the main issue keeping me away from USDAA -- There is no way my big dogs are jumping 26". The lowest Kaiser could jump in USDAA would be 12" Performance and I'm not doing that with him anymore. So, sadly, it looks like we won't be doing USDAA for a while, because I won't just show one dog. Secret would love USDAA because she likes the tighter courses. Oh well.

 

And that's another misconception -- Just because NADAC might be my venue of choice, it doesn't mean I only practice NADAC skills. My dogs are all well rounded and can run courses from any venue. I just choose to trial in NADAC -- mainly for jump height reasons, but also $$. They are readily available in my area and I have invested a lot of money towards our titles and am loath to start at the beginning.

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Eta:

That was my friend biggest complaint the times. Her dog had placed in akc nationalsI and had a gorgeous run but didn't make time(no dog actually made time). When they complain to the judge, she was surprise the dog didn't make time, and then changed the course time to allow for her dog to make it in?! So out of the whole class only 2 dogs passed because of the time adjustment. :) nice of the judge but how in the world did they wheel the course to get such a impossible time? <- that why I was asking about the times. This was in NADAC

 

To answer what you added -- Courses are not wheeled in NADAC. They are set to flow and paced -- Or some judges just come up with yardage off the course map. Sometimes they miscalculate or it gets entered wrong into the computer. I have seen course time adjusted a couple of times after results were posted and it was typically due to human error somewhere or another. It's really not a big deal. There was one time I was certain the yardage was off on a course and we came in over time, but I didn't bring it up because I didn't figure it was worth it. The majority of teams who ran clean did come in under time (barely) -- but the yardage just seemed off to me.

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i do CPE for the most part and NADAC when i can find it in a 3.5 hr drive time. not as often as i like. i enjoy both. they are very friendly venues. both want you to have fun and be successful. as someone said earlier, it's more about you and your dog doing your personal best, rather than beating other dogs in the class. in cpe there is a title(for lack of a better term) called the Perfect Weekend. that is entering your dog in all the classes offered for the weekend and Qing in all of them. it can happen for any level and for any amount of teams. in fact one trial we go to, the woman who runs it announces during the briefing that there are perfect weekend ribbons and if you think you and your dog had a perfect weekend, meeting or exceeding or own personal goals, have a ribbon, regardless of Q's. i don't think i've ever seen anyone take one, but it's nice to know that perfection can be much more personal than a Q. i.e-getting a shy dog to stay on the course, do the teeter, the dogwalk, whatever.

nadac does tend to be flow-y and about the distance with very competitive times. my older dog twitch has trouble Qing in open because he goes over time. nova has no problem. they have fun courses like tunnelers-tunnels only- kind of a border collie cannon! and touch and go-the emphasis on contacts.

cpe has fun classes like wildcard, a discrimination game and colors: 2 short courses on the field and you and your dog have to choose one and stay on it!

i haven't tried USDAA. mostly because it is not readily available around here. i'm also not crazy about the jump heights.

i haven't tried AKC and have no desire to do so.

both of those venues are considered less friendly, more stressful in these parts

i don't think the dogs "know" different venues. they are just glad to be with you ou there running.

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I run mostly NADAC and have done some USDAA (which would be my venue of choice if there was more trials closer) and we train on AKC style courses.

 

My older dog I don't think noticed the difference, and he had no problem making time in USDAA when he can struggle in NADAC. He was also jumping 16" in both. (performance and skilled)

 

My young dog jumps 26" in USDAA and I have no problem with this as he is tall and lightly built, in NADAC its 20". I find that he is more in control on USDAA / AKC style courses in NADAC with the lower jump heights and flow he flattens out and becomes a rocket, which usually means my handling is behind, and well it goes pear shaped.

 

An important feature of NADAC is training in the ring, which is one reason in my area a lot of AKC folk came to NADAC as they can work on a problem in a trial enviroment. My youngster is still in novice because I have chosen to enforce every 2 on 2 off contact, every start line. So we have not Qd often this year, although we often get first place ribbons! As he is a baby it is really starting to pay off.

 

I had a friend really struggle to get her NADCH, due to the distance in chances, she had a MACH and ADCH already on this dog (she actually started him in NADAC). Chances is well named because some of the courses are doable and others I have seen no elite dogs Q. I have seen novice courses that were as easy as the gamble in USDAA and others I have just laughed and ran the course with out attempting it as it would only confuse my dog.

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OK, the video above is fixed and you can view it now.

 

The one linked below was a Fullhouse run - Level 3. In Fullhouse everyone runs on the same course, but the points needed is determined by level.

 

In this game, basically, the handler has to make his or her own course, every piece of equipment has a point value, and you have to have 3 single bar jumps, two "circles" (tunnels or tire), and one other. Then you have to gain enough points at your level within a set amount of time. When the whistle blows, you have 5 seconds to get to the table (to stop the game) and you lose a point for every second over.

 

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Or those hoops to regular full height? Would you still call them jumps? Or do you teach it like its a new obstacle? Lol is it apparent how little I know outside my venue?

 

I teach them like any other obstacle. I use "through" as my hoop cue, and it really is just like anything else.

 

If you want to see what I might do, here I'm working with Tessa with it. The goal of this training session wasn't actually the hoop, but to play GMAB for focus with the cows in the background (this was filmed as part of an online focus discussion). But I was also familiarizing her with the hoop. She had worked with it indoors, but this was her first time working with it "for real".

 

 

There is usually a practice hoop at NADAC trials, as there is a practice jump in other venues. I always take the opportunity to run my dog through it a few times, since there are not hoops in our courses at class. Dean has never had a problem with hoops on the course, and I don't think Tessa is going to, either. Next she and I will start working on sending to it.

 

Ummmmm . . . soon. Like this weekend!! LOL!! This was an excellent reminder!!

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Re: the hoops in NADAC. As others have said, it is not a big deal to teach a dog to go through the hoops. The challenge is handling the dog's path. If you have correctly 'drawn' the path, the dog just flows through the hoops.

 

Having said that, I did have a problem with one hoop. I mainly (always) train with jumps and pretty much the only time my dog sees hoops is the once-a-year NADAC trial. He does fine with all the hoops (even does great on a hoopers course - 13 seconds on his Novice try last year), BUT if the hoop is the last obstacle on the course, he often does not understand that he has to go through the last hoop to finish the course. I have had several runs when he goes through the tunnel or DW as the penultimate obstacle and he thinks he is finished. He turns to look at me as he usually does when he finishes a course - before he goes through that last hoop!! I just have to laugh.

 

This reminds me that I should make some hoops (directions on the NADAC website) and practice before our yearly NADAC trial in March.

 

Jovi

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BUT if the hoop is the last obstacle on the course, he often does not understand that he has to go through the last hoop to finish the course. I have had several runs when he goes through the tunnel or DW as the penultimate obstacle and he thinks he is finished. He turns to look at me as he usually does when he finishes a course - before he goes through that last hoop!! I just have to laugh.

 

I was having that issue with Dean with the last jump on the course and the thing that helped was pretending that there was actually something else afterward that would require a turn (on his part) to my side of the jump after he took it!! I would walk the course as if we were going to go off to the left or right to do something else, and then handle it that way.

 

Haven't had a problem since. Might be different for you, but I thought I'd share that since it did the trick.

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Thank you, Kristine. Nice runs :)

 

 

Okay, the UKC.

 

First, in order to understand the obstacles used, you have to remember that the UKC is very much a performance registry. They routinely have Terrier Races and Hunt trials among other things, and, as far as I know, for the longest time they were the only all breed registry that allowed you to register and compete fixed mixed breeds alongside purebreds in everything except conformation. That, and the fact that the UKC is based in Kalamazoo literally 5 minutes from where I live so there are a lot of shows I could attend, appealed to me. I got started several years ago with Maverick in obedience and rally, but the problem with his back legs prevented us from entering any agility trials.

 

My only prior experience with trialing had been going to AKC shows. At those shows, I was not impressed. Any questions I had were met with a certain air of contempt...if the person took the time to talk to me at all. Not a warm and welcoming reception, and it left me very, very nervous about even trying to trial. My first UKC show was local, I knew Maverick was ready, so I entered him and went expecting something similar to what I had experienced at the AKC. Not at all. Night and day difference. Never once did anyone I met put Maverick down because he's a rescued mix and they were very supportive and tolerant of my questions. The basic philosophy is "everyone was new once."

 

I've a few nasty people in the UKC, but they seem to be few and far between.

 

I am by no means an expert in UKC agility. I've run AKC-style in 4H, teach the basics to prevent injury, and have built my own equipment. My business partner knows a lot more than I do, so she's the one that runs the classes while I play backup and assistant.

 

The highest attainable title in UKC Agility is UGRACH. Like the MACH, a dog ca achieve it several times, so you can have a UGRACH5 or higher.

 

They have all the standard equipment (bar jumps, Aframe, dog walk, teeter, tunnels, chutes, tire jump, pause box/table, weave poles) plus a lot more. Running a UKC course requires the dog to really trust their handler. There are several types of blind hurdles where the dog can't see what's beyond the jump, sway bridges and swing planks, crawl tunnel, a hoop tunnel, platform jump, and so many different kinds of hurdles that I won't even attempt to describe them all.

 

You can fault. I'm still learning the rules about those, so I'm not going to go into it. It's all in the rulebook.

 

The times have been very reasonable in the shows I've been to, and you have to come in under time to Q. Here's the link to the 2011 Agility Rulebook.

 

I don't have any videos of my own, but I found some with nice runs:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaPNVOfA85g

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IP5e1vZO6k8

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I've always thought UKC Agility to be very interesting. I like that they have some really different equipment.

 

They do have UKC trials around here, but I've never tried. It's on my "maybe someday" list!!

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This was Maddie's first ever Snooker run.

 

 

I was intimidated by Snooker and avoided it for quite a while. In this trial, one Level 1 person after another got whistled off the course before us. I felt like I was going onto the Gong Show!! Whistle - NEXT!! LOL!!

 

So, Maddie went out there and did an awesome job!! Maddie was a great Snooker dog because she was not a dog who took off course pieces of equipment. She could do the "red" jumps, wrap back around them, and go wherever I wanted her to go next. Snooker was our best, and favorite, game. At the end, just before the video cuts off, you hear hearty applause starting. Everyone was happy that someone finally got to the end!!!

 

CPE Snooker is very similar to USDAA Snooker, except you only do three reds/colors in the opening. The fourth one is there, but only as a backup in case you should knock a bar on one red jump in the opening. If the red jump that you knock in the opening is part of the closing, you can only go as far as that jump in the closing, and then you have to go to the table and stop the game. If you knock two red jumps in the opening, you're done.

 

I love this game!!

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I trial in both AKC and CPE currently, I have done USDAA, NADAC, UKI, and TDAA as well. My dogs and I like AKC and CPE better, so that's what we stick with. I like CPE due to all the games they have. Depending on the weekend that means either 4 or 5 runs a day, and multiply that by 4 dogs and I am never bored! CPE has really picked up in my area, and we average one, sometimes two trials a month.

 

I tried AKC after years of telling myself I would never do it. I have heard a lot of negative comments from other people but decided I needed to see for myself. Let me tell you, I love it! Granted I'm not in Excellent yet, but I have found the people to be very nice and welcoming. I like the contrast between CPE and AKC. Sometimes it's nice to only have 2 runs per dog per day.

 

I'm sure I'll venture out into the other organizations but with 4 (and one upcomer) dogs I need to pick and choose what I do. I feel bad if I have to leave one at home, they know where I'm going.

 

I don't feel the need to be competitive with the other teams, as my own dogs have their own issues to overcome. There's one person I know that says the only thing they care about is the green Q ribbon. I'm just glad to be able to run my dogs and that they want to be there.

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A few years ago, a friend of mine and I wanted to try to get one Q in every Agility venue that we have reasonable access to in our area. And that's a lot of venues - CPE, NADAC, UKC, Docna, Teacup, USDAA, AKC, and possibly ASCA (never checked to see if that one exists anywhere nearby). Since then UKI, VALOR, and the super size venue have started, too, so we might have included those.

 

But she moved away and it's not as much fun without a partner in crime. Also, I had a job where I earned more money back then. I couldn't afford all of the registration numbers I'd have to get now - not for just one Q for most of the venues. We also would have had to borrow a teacup dog.

 

Still, it was a fun idea. It would have been cool to get a first hand view - from the competitor perspective - of all of them.

 

I guess it would have been about the Q ribbon in that case, but more as a marker of having done it!!

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My biggest reason for trying every venue (I have not done ASCA...yet lol) was so I can't knock it before I try it. My goal wasn't to get a Q in it, it was to see where we fit. I did a few years of NADAC but we didn't have the distance skills to get very far.

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I'm curious about those who say, "We don't have the distance skills for NADAC" and then just give up and don't do it anymore.

 

Is there a reason you don't feel like training any of those distance skills? They do come in handy while running courses in other organizations as well.

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I like running with my dog, not watching my dog go out and hopefully take the right obstacle.

 

We do have distance as you need distance in Jackpot for CPE. I also don't like the lack of equipment in NADAC and the tunnel/contact discrimination gets old. So distance wasn't the only reason I quit NADAC. I also hate the hoops.

 

Last I checked, I didn't have to stay with an organization just because that's what I started with. I liked CPE better so we switched.

 

I'd rather spend my time training other skills, not just because I didn't "feel like it."

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Our primary venue is AAC, which is closest to USDAA in terms of classes offered, jump heights, etc. One big difference is that there are three classes - Regular, Specials, Veterans - in which you can run your dog. Specials is one jump height below your dog's regular jump height (so if you measured into the 26" class, you can run 22" Specials) with no spreads, a 5' A-Frame, and the same standard course time as Regular. Veterans is for dogs over 7. You can jump one or two jump heights below your regular height, no spreads, 5' frame, and 20% allowance in the SCT. The only thing is, once you've chosen to put your dog in Specials or Veterans, you can't move back to Regular. Other differences between AAC and USDAA - no slats on the dogwalk, no table in Masters (hurrah!), and our Steeplechase has a SCT so it's possible for the entire class to qualify.

 

We've done USDAA, NADAC, DOCNA, and ASCA and I really like all of them. We haven't done NADAC in years, but I think I'll take Her Royal Tunnelers to a couple trials in the New Year. Tunnelers has always been her favourite class, and at 11, I think she can still crank out some pretty impressive times. Of course, she has no start-line stay anymore, so it's gonna be hectic!

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