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Hello All!

 

I have a young BC pup that eventually will be working cattle, but at the moment is too young to go out. I have been reading up on some training techniques for BC's (I have a Blue Heeler that I am training at the moment) and most sources state for correction methods to use a piece of rubber hose so you can kind of aim it at the dog when they do something wrong... I am not sure if this is an expectable method of correction. I find with my heeler it is easiest to hit a stick on the ground in front of me to grab his attention and get his mind off doing the wrong thing. (I don't want to use this method with a BC if it is going to scare them since they are such soft dogs) I never ever have used anything to throw at him or hit him with. I know BC's are a much softer dog then a Heeler as well and I don't want to put any unnecessary pressure on my pups. What are some common means of correction that don't involve throwing something at the dog? I've also heard using one of those cattle paddles with the beads inside to shake at the dog works well...

 

Also when is a good age to start a pup on cattle? Our calves are getting fairly big by now and I don't want him to get injured. He is showing a lot of interest in the cows and calves that are in the corrals already. He is only about 4 months old... Being that cows and calves are a lot bigger then sheep and can be more dangerous then them as well what would you suggest as far as introducing him and when to start his actual training?

 

 

Thanks!!

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Hello All!

 

I have a young BC pup that eventually will be working cattle, but at the moment is too young to go out. I have been reading up on some training techniques for BC's (I have a Blue Heeler that I am training at the moment) and most sources state for correction methods to use a piece of rubber hose so you can kind of aim it at the dog when they do something wrong... I am not sure if this is an expectable method of correction. I find with my heeler it is easiest to hit a stick on the ground in front of me to grab his attention and get his mind off doing the wrong thing. (I don't want to use this method with a BC if it is going to scare them since they are such soft dogs) I never ever have used anything to throw at him or hit him with. I know BC's are a much softer dog then a Heeler as well and I don't want to put any unnecessary pressure on my pups. What are some common means of correction that don't involve throwing something at the dog? I've also heard using one of those cattle paddles with the beads inside to shake at the dog works well...

 

Also when is a good age to start a pup on cattle? Our calves are getting fairly big by now and I don't want him to get injured. He is showing a lot of interest in the cows and calves that are in the corrals already. He is only about 4 months old... Being that cows and calves are a lot bigger then sheep and can be more dangerous then them as well what would you suggest as far as introducing him and when to start his actual training?

Thanks!!

 

Oh Boy!!!! I don't know where you are geting your information but I would really try to find another source before you start your new dog. 4 months is certainly no time to be taking him to stock other than to walk through them to see how he reacts to them. I have no idea how old your heeler is but, if he is just a pup, I would lighten up on "correction" a bit. There is a very good book by Vergil Holland that will help you get started. It is called Herding Dogs, Progressive Training and will get you started very well and is a good reference when you run into trouble. I train a lot of cattle dogs and I start them all on sheep. I find it much better that way as you can get better flanks quicker as the sheep move much differently than cattle. Dogs react to them much better and, of course, there is less chance of injury on sheep. It's very easy to change them over to cows once the training is advanced far enough. As far as age of the dog is concerned, you need to wait until the dog is mature enough to handle the pressure of training and corrections(not the kind you were referring to). This can happen usually between the ages of 8 and 14 months but each dog is different in this department. I would also recommend that you try and find a reputable trainer to help you get a start properly with this as your dog will be of much more help if he is trained properly. If you need help with this there are lots of people on this board who can steer you towards the right person for your area. I may be able to help also if you let me know where you are. You really do need to get more information before you start yoiur new dog and I can help but you need someone to SHOW you how to get started. There are lots of clinics coming up now too so try to get into one of these and get some instruction before you get started. Keep in touch and good luck.......Bob

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