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Help my new friend CGC

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I have a new BC of just a few days ago and have been working with him ever since. I would describe him as very reserved and very jumpy. I ran him though a series of tests today and gave him an honest assessment towards CGC.

 

Test 1. Accepting a Friendly Stranger - Pass

Test 2. Sitting Politely for Petting - Pass

Test 3. Appearance and Grooming -Pass

Test 4. Out for a Walk (walk on a loose leash) Pass

Test 5. Walking Through a Crowd - Pass

Test 6. Sit and Down on Command Pass- Staying in Place - fail

Test 7. Coming When Called - Pass

Test 8. Reaction to Another Dog - Pass

Test 9. Reactions to Distractions -Fail

Test 10. Supervised Separation - Fail

 

His name is Jax and he will not leave my side, wherever I go, he goes. Unless I'm within 10 feet of his food, he won't even eat. He's insecure and definitively unsure about almost everything. He's 1 years old and a rescue of unknown history. He's a really sweet, sensitive guy that's is just not sure of much of anything. Even when I was teaching basic commands I thought he was afraid to make a mistake, or the panic wouldn't let him focus on the command.

 

What can I do to help him relax?

 

Thanks

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#1 thing is to just give him time. You haven't even had him a week. Give him time to settle in, get to know you and your home and adjust to his new life. I'm not trying to be harsh, but you're expecting way too much out of him this soon. Time and baby steps are what he needs.

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Jin is 10 1/2 months and taking the CGC for the second time tomorrow. He may not pass as he failed sit last time. If necessary I'll give him more training and time. That;s all you can do. Be patient.

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Jin is 10 1/2 months and taking the CGC for the second time tomorrow. He may not pass as he failed sit last time. If necessary I'll give him more training and time. That;s all you can do. Be patient.

 

 

Oh sure we have plenty of time, I was just hoping there was something I could do to help along the process.

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Just give him time to bond with you without expecting so much. Have fun together set limits but I wouldn't barrage him with lots of training right now. He is still getting to know you. Focus on having fun with him and gaining his trust.

 

It could take at least a month (or more) to really see what he is really like.

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Oh sure we have plenty of time, I was just hoping there was something I could do to help along the process.

 

Patient persistence. Or maybe persistent patience. Get to know him and he you. Let him learn to trust you. Work on your bond with each other. Find things he has fun doing. Go for walks together. Train him. Enjoy the journey with him and let him set the pace.

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Ha...I've been working with Daisy for 2 years and we're never going to pass the supervised separation. She has no trouble being left alone, or meeting strangers, but she does not like to be left alone with strangers.

 

Like everybody said, all you need to do is keep working and give it time. The CGC is all about comfort and confidence. Just keep working every day and be sure to enjoy your time together. Don't stress over the specific tasks, because that will just stress the dog and make success impossible.

 

And congrats on the new addition.

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One thing I've done to help with Supervised Seperation with my pups is to "trade" dogs with people I know and trust, and have them work with the dog for about ten minutes or so. At first, we're in the same vacinity/room, then we start taking short walks out of sight. Next thing you know, you can pass your dog off to someone and take off for several minutes or an hour. The really cool thing about this is that we (the humans) are helping each other out. Maverick, ham that he is, buttered up to the woman I left him with for the test. I think he was trying to get treats out of her since that's what always happened when I left him with someone. Point is, he never let on that he knew I was gone, and the more people you practice with, the better.

 

Other than that, it just takes time like everyone else has said.

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When I first got my dog 4 years ago, I read the list of CGC requirements and thought, "Oh, this dog will NEVER be able to do those things!" He was that messed up, and terrified of being near strangers. I kind of set passing the CGC as my ultimate goal for the goal, the gigantic test that would mean I had made progress with him.

 

So, I just worked with him and did normal dog things (walks, obedience, some intro to agility). Now, I look at the list of requirements for CGC and shrug and think, "Eh, Buddy can do all those." I'm still not 100% sure he would sit contentedly if I left the room, but I don't think he'd freak out. Anyway, I can hardly remember the dog I used to have, who would have panicked at almost all the CGC checks.

 

For my dog, it was just a matter of gaining confidence in general. Most of all, I think he had to learn to trust me and trust his place in the world. Everything flowed from there.

 

Definitely give yours a bit more time. You've only had a blink of an eye.

 

Mary

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Thanks everyone, I'll give him more time to settle. The first few days he would not play with my Aussie. Now, they play rough and tumble throughout the day. He shut down at getting in the car. He jumps right in now. He had not been worked with at ALL. Didn't know sit from eat. He wasn't good on a leash. Today, he sits and downs and I could walk him 100 miles and he wouldn't hit the end of hit leash unless spooked. He's really made progress in just a few days to say the least.

 

We know he was a country dog and we think an outside dog. I have moved him to the city and he's an inside dog now. I'm sure it's information overload and he's still trying to sort it all out. He'll gain confidence in time and I've seen it first hand so far. I just see him struggling to to deal with all this newest and was hoping there was something I could do to expedite the confidence building process for him. CGC is not a goal for me, but for Jax so he can be balanced and feel free to be the happy dog he really is inside. No more rushing, it's the journey not the destination, I get it and thanks.

 

I wonder if CGC classes would help?

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I have a new BC of just a few days ago and have been working with him ever since.

Of course he's reserved! He's still in relocation shock. There are aspects of his personality you will likely not see for weeks or months - He needs to settle in and grow to trust you. Still, this sounds like a great start. Continue giving him love, time, and work - No need to rush through this.

 

Pass Pass Pass Pass Pass Pass/fail Pass Pass Fail Fail

Hmmm. Only had him a few days, and you ran a string of results like that? Quelle horreur! :rolleyes: Seriously - Just keep on as you've been doing, and he'll do you both proud.

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I have had Maddie since she is 7 weeks old and she has repeatedly failed the sit and walk away. She will be 4 in April. She has a need to walk with me no matter how hard I try.

 

I'd give your dog some time before attempting the cgc. Why set up to fail.

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I wonder if CGC classes would help?

I think a class would be great, but it might be a better learning opportunity for her if you could give her a few weeks to settle in with you before asking her to cope with all the strange dogs and people.

 

When we first got Daisy, she was estimated to be 1 to 1.5 years old, and I believe she'd been an outdoor dog, in a small pen. We signed up for a class with the goal of getting the CGC certificate. The class really opened my eyes to how special border collies and Daisy are. She was so ostentatiously quick. After a few minutes of instruction, she'd be on the ground before the instructor had even finished saying "down your dog" whilst others were just beginning to try to get the attention of their labs, and don't even ask about the 8-month-old Giant Schnauzer pup! :rolleyes: For Daisy, and probably your Jax too, the class was really about being able to cope with the strange people and dogs. The funny part was that the class started with about five minutes of arrival and meet-and-greet, and then we'd all take our places in a big circle. Once that circle was established, Daisy liked it fine and paid great attention. However, if anyone left early or arrived late, she would get very disturbed, looking every way to try to figure out where they'd gone or why they were interrupting, and I'd have to really work to get her to refocus. It was good practice in working around the other dogs and people in semi-controlled circumstances.

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If you guys are interested, maybe I will do some videos today to show you where I think he is on all this. If nothing else it would give me a before and after snap shot as he relaxes a little more. It's hard to click and treat hold the camera phone and leash, but I bet we could work something out. You would see just the way I saw it no matter what happens :rolleyes:

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I think a class would be great, but it might be a better learning opportunity for her if you could give her a few weeks to settle in with you before asking her to cope with all the strange dogs and people.

 

When we first got Daisy, she was estimated to be 1 to 1.5 years old, and I believe she'd been an outdoor dog, in a small pen. We signed up for a class with the goal of getting the CGC certificate. The class really opened my eyes to how special border collies and Daisy are. She was so ostentatiously quick. After a few minutes of instruction, she'd be on the ground before the instructor had even finished saying "down your dog" whilst others were just beginning to try to get the attention of their labs, and don't even ask about the 8-month-old Giant Schnauzer pup! :rolleyes: For Daisy, and probably your Jax too, the class was really about being able to cope with the strange people and dogs. The funny part was that the class started with about five minutes of arrival and meet-and-greet, and then we'd all take our places in a big circle. Once that circle was established, Daisy liked it fine and paid great attention. However, if anyone left early or arrived late, she would get very disturbed, looking every way to try to figure out where they'd gone or why they were interrupting, and I'd have to really work to get her to refocus. It was good practice in working around the other dogs and people in semi-controlled circumstances.

 

 

Hi Shoresdog,

 

I have one of those, an Aussie, razor sharp, incredibly focused. She is really snappy on commands and it took minutes to teach something new. In the first 3 days I had run out of basics to teach her and was considering Photoshop and this Aussie knew NOTHING the first day. This is my other dog in the house btw. High energy, highly reactive. Jax is the opposite from what I can tell.

 

Jax get's along with everybody and all dogs and ignores all cats. That was part of my screening process. I looked at about 50 dogs carefully before picking Jax. He's been to the public dog park with me and did fine. He was more focused on his ball though than other dogs. He just wasn't into them but did not shy away. My Aussie though he LOVES and they play all day. It took a few days for that to happen but it could not be more perfect right now and I have a very rough and tumble loves to play nonstop kind of Aussie. It's a really good match so far.

 

I'll let you guys see some vids and then you can make some better suggestions. It's not "that" bad at all. He's just a good and mild mannered guy.

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Here a couple of vids from this morning. No clicker no treats.

 

The first one is him now in front of the electric doors that spooked him so bad his first day. We've spent some time working on that and here is the result.

 

 

This one is meeting a friendly stranger and at the end the electric doors shutting and you'll see his reaction again. This is how he meets everyone, but sometimes he sits right in front of them. He didn't do it this time but you'll see exactly what I got on the first try in all these videos good or bad.

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Here a couple of vids from this morning. No clicker no treats.

 

The first one is him now in front of the electric doors that spooked him so bad his first day. We've spent some time working on that and here is the result.

This one is meeting a friendly stranger and at the end the electric doors shutting and you'll see his reaction again. This is how he meets everyone, but sometimes he sits right in front of them. He didn't do it this time but you'll see exactly what I got on the first try in all these videos good or bad.

 

 

Here's loose leash walking, Sit down on command, Grooming and appearance, come when called and a fail at stay at very end.

 

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Jax is over his reaction threshold here but I found him more comfortable on the other side of me and completely comfortable on the other side of the hedges. What seems to spook him are loud sudden noises and trucks, Buses.

 

What I'm not sure of is how afraid is considered normal. I would jump too if someone dropped a book behind me. We have made this walk at least once in the last few days, he's better than he was by a mile, but it's still too much.

 

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Here's loose leash walking, Sit down on command, Grooming and appearance, come when called and a fail at stay at very end.

 

 

Hi,

 

What a beautiful dog! For having him such a short time he's really learned so much! If this were my dog, and I was going to teach stays, I'd start with my dog beside me and have him assume whatever position I was going to have him stay in, sit, down, stand(Since your dog is just learning and I'm sure hasn't generalized performing his commands in lots of different locations, I'd be sure to really praise and reward each command he did correctly). Then with the dog beside me in the sit(for example) I'd then give a clear 'stay' command(one word) and hand signal. You can apply light upward pressure to the lead and/or run your hand down his back putting gentle pressure and praise a good stay. I'd stay beside my dog the first time and only have him hold the stay a few seconds. If that was successful, the next time, pivot around in front of him and stand toe to toe. This is just a few seconds and slowly work up from there. Again, apply gentle upward pressure to the lead. The pressure is just a gentle reminder to the dog and doesn't have to be constant. To release the dog, pivot back into heel position calm praise then give the dog your release word. Don't let the dog release himself. With stays I really take my time and if my dog is anxious or nervous I'll go back a few steps in my training to help with his confidence.

 

I show my dogs in obedience and they have to be able to do a 3 minute out of sight sit stay and a 5 minute out of sight down stay in a line of dogs, so it's really important that I don't rush things and let them build confidence on their own time frame. It takes months and months to build solid stays on most dogs. Remember to have a positive, confident attitude, if you're tenitive or uncertain your dog will pick up on that. Most of all, enjoy your new best friend=)

 

Have Fun~

 

Janet

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Hi,

 

What a beautiful dog! For having him such a short time he's really learned so much! If this were my dog, and I was going to teach stays, I'd start with my dog beside me and have him assume whatever position I was going to have him stay in, sit, down, stand(Since your dog is just learning and I'm sure hasn't generalized performing his commands in lots of different locations, I'd be sure to really praise and reward each command he did correctly). Then with the dog beside me in the sit(for example) I'd then give a clear 'stay' command(one word) and hand signal. You can apply light upward pressure to the lead and/or run your hand down his back putting gentle pressure and praise a good stay. I'd stay beside my dog the first time and only have him hold the stay a few seconds. If that was successful, the next time, pivot around in front of him and stand toe to toe. This is just a few seconds and slowly work up from there. Again, apply gentle upward pressure to the lead. The pressure is just a gentle reminder to the dog and doesn't have to be constant. To release the dog, pivot back into heel position calm praise then give the dog your release word. Don't let the dog release himself. With stays I really take my time and if my dog is anxious or nervous I'll go back a few steps in my training to help with his confidence.

 

I show my dogs in obedience and they have to be able to do a 3 minute out of sight sit stay and a 5 minute out of sight down stay in a line of dogs, so it's really important that I don't rush things and let them build confidence on their own time frame. It takes months and months to build solid stays on most dogs. Remember to have a positive, confident attitude, if you're tenitive or uncertain your dog will pick up on that. Most of all, enjoy your new best friend=)

 

Have Fun~

 

Janet

 

 

Thanks Janet, I will try that next time. Two things are happening here is my guess. One is I just trained him to follow me on a leash but that was very easy as he followed me everywhere for 4 days. I work from home so I'm with him all day, since the first minute he was here he has been by my side. He won't even eat without me in the same room. He will leave my side to play with my Aussie, but other than that, he's surgically implanted to me.

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Jax is over his reaction threshold here but I found him more comfortable on the other side of me and completely comfortable on the other side of the hedges. What seems to spook him are loud sudden noises and trucks, Buses.

 

What I'm not sure of is how afraid is considered normal. I would jump too if someone dropped a book behind me. We have made this walk at least once in the last few days, he's better than he was by a mile, but it's still too much.

 

 

I don't see an over the top reaction at all, I think he got a little spooked by the motorcycle and bounced back quite nicely, it is not that a dog cannot spook at noises it is how quickly they bounce back, and for a dog that isn't even bonded with you yet, he is doing very well. I am not sure if you sought out a noisy busy street to walk him by on purpose, or if that is out of your front door, but I would probably find a quieter place to go until he has settled in more. Flooding a new dog with all that kind of stimulus can really backfire, ask him do things (like heel, or leave it) in a quiet place where he can learn without distractions, then move into more distraction and then onto a busy street.

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I don't see an over the top reaction at all, I think he got a little spooked by the motorcycle and bounced back quite nicely, it is not that a dog cannot spook at noises it is how quickly they bounce back, and for a dog that isn't even bonded with you yet, he is doing very well. I am not sure if you sought out a noisy busy street to walk him by on purpose, or if that is out of your front door, but I would probably find a quieter place to go until he has settled in more. Flooding a new dog with all that kind of stimulus can really backfire, ask him do things (like heel, or leave it) in a quiet place where he can learn without distractions, then move into more distraction and then onto a busy street.

 

 

I have done that very thing. He'll leave it, drop it, heel, sit and down in front of a busy grocery store with people walking and grocery carts rattling. That's where we've been the last few days after we worked in the house, then outside on a quiet street. He's pretty solid in those places so I'm moving to areas of more distractions. I should move him back some though to a point where he's less reactive, then move forward once he's more comfortable.

 

I live in the heart of city and we walk those busy streets daily. We walk to the shopping center, cross busy roads and go in stores that are pet friendly. My dogs are go anywhere do anything kind of dogs. I take my dogs almost everywhere in the car if weather and circumstances permit. I take them to concerts, arts and crafts fairs, 4th of July fireworks etc etc. They simply must be desensitized at least somewhat or stay at home.

 

He's miles ahead of where he was 4 days ago and in another 4 days he should be even better. No rush on all this, just a logical progression and let him take it at his own pace, but with a bit of a push so he can gain his confidence.

 

Tomorrow we'll be going to the bike paths and watch the joggers for a while. He's a little too interested in those and I don't want that to escalate. Then we'll walk through the crowds at the Farmers Market in downtown Dallas. Pretty soon, I'll look up and have a city dog like my Aussie. I've been through all this before with her and she's a very confident dog today.

 

I think we'll sign up for the CGC classes, it will be fun for me and good for him and more bonding. I think it makes sense on a number of levels. Even if he never receives a CGC, he's already a really great dog to me.

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Jin passed his CGC today. The tester who knew Jin said that she's never seen so much improvement in a dog in 4 weeks.

 

Prior to the test I took him for an hours ball chase and run at the park. Arriving an hour early I took him to the agility field where I had an opportunity to teach him to run across the plank bridge, the A-frame and through some barrels set up like a slalom By the end of a half hour he had them down pat. Good for Jin. The nclass and the test. He almost failed when he got a little snarky but the tester said due to his improvement she was going to overlook it. She all so complimented him by saying he did very well for a 10 mo old puppy. Thank you Miss C:

 

Graduation Photo

10623_1130239703845_1462816993_30303499_2939684_n.jpg

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I have done that very thing. He'll leave it, drop it, heel, sit and down in front of a busy grocery store with people walking and grocery carts rattling. That's where we've been the last few days after we worked in the house, then outside on a quiet street. He's pretty solid in those places so I'm moving to areas of more distractions. I should move him back some though to a point where he's less reactive, then move forward once he's more comfortable.

 

I live in the heart of city and we walk those busy streets daily. We walk to the shopping center, cross busy roads and go in stores that are pet friendly. My dogs are go anywhere do anything kind of dogs. I take my dogs almost everywhere in the car if weather and circumstances permit. I take them to concerts, arts and crafts fairs, 4th of July fireworks etc etc. They simply must be desensitized at least somewhat or stay at home.

 

He's miles ahead of where he was 4 days ago and in another 4 days he should be even better. No rush on all this, just a logical progression and let him take it at his own pace, but with a bit of a push so he can gain his confidence.

 

Tomorrow we'll be going to the bike paths and watch the joggers for a while. He's a little too interested in those and I don't want that to escalate. Then we'll walk through the crowds at the Farmers Market in downtown Dallas. Pretty soon, I'll look up and have a city dog like my Aussie. I've been through all this before with her and she's a very confident dog today.

 

Whoa! why not just let him learn to trust you then get out and about for all your desensitizing? You're doing an awful lot with a dog who you really don't know yet.

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Jin passed his CGC today. The tester who knew Jin said that she's never seen so much improvement in a dog in 4 weeks.

 

Prior to the test I took him for an hours ball chase and run at the park. Arriving an hour early I took him to the agility field where I had an opportunity to teach him to run across the plank bridge, the A-frame and through some barrels set up like a slalom By the end of a half hour he had them down pat. Good for Jin. The nclass and the test. He almost failed when he got a little snarky but the tester said due to his improvement she was going to overlook it. She all so complimented him by saying he did very well for a 10 mo old puppy. Thank you Miss C:

 

Graduation Photo

10623_1130239703845_1462816993_30303499_2939684_n.jpg

 

 

Congrats to you and Jin! He sounds like a fun, smart and now cgc dog and at 10 months too!

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