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Define for me "Hi value treat"

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Would someone please define for me the phrase: "Hi value treat"

 

According to my trainer this usually means something like a a high quality training treat an all meat, fish, lamb, etc product. Or something stinky that they would like to eat like a nice cheese, etc.

 

But what about things like Beggin' strips (no food value per se but lots of smell)

 

While I would prefer to use a hi quality treat they are expensive and I have to watch the budget. The problem is in knowing where to balance it. If Beggin strips work as well as all meat treats I could mix them in to help.

 

I currently use Alpo and Milkbone biscuits along with freeze dried liver pieces and several real meat/fish products and other products PETA would disapprove of. :rolleyes:

 

Suggestions?

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"high-valued" means something your dog gets all a-quiver and cross-eyed over. For some, that means fresh seared liver, for others it could be a squeaky toy. It should be something your dog will drop other activities to get to (so might depend on the situation). For instance, at home, my dog considers stale bread to be high-valued, while at the park, string cheese might be needed.

 

ETA: for high quality treats, I think "Yummy Chummies" are quite good, and fairly economical in bulk - Helping Udders sells them by the 2.5lb bag, plus I believe they're having a promotion for increased donations to rescue. Be creative though - a lot of human foods work great; I've heard of sauerkraut being very popular, though I haven't tried it myself.

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We use cheapo hotdogs and cheepo cheese ( buy a block and chop it up into small pieces) as a high value treat around here. I also save any leftover meats from dinner and use those as a super high value treat.

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Would someone please define for me the phrase: "Hi value treat"

 

According to my trainer this usually means something like a a high quality training treat an all meat, fish, lamb, etc product. Or something stinky that they would like to eat like a nice cheese, etc.

 

But what about things like Beggin' strips (no food value per se but lots of smell)

 

While I would prefer to use a hi quality treat they are expensive and I have to watch the budget. The problem is in knowing where to balance it. If Beggin strips work as well as all meat treats I could mix them in to help.

 

I currently use Alpo and Milkbone biscuits along with freeze dried liver pieces and several real meat/fish products and other products PETA would disapprove of. :rolleyes:

 

Suggestions?

 

I find most dogs are pretty enthusiastic about cat kibble. Especially the oily ones like Science Diet "regular" adult formula. And though it's frowned upon by some, Goldfish Crackers seem to work well too. The up side is you get zillions of rewards in a bag of Goldfish Crackers, and gazillions of rewards in a bag of cat kibble. So the per treat cost is low and you can fit a whole lot of them in a pocket or treat pouch. They don't seem to care that the treat is tiny either. The down side is mostly with Goldfish Crackers - preservatives, seriously empty calories, and you may eat more of them than the dog does - which ratchets up your per treat cost. :D

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The important thing in this definition is the dog's response. Like sluj says, different things work for different dogs, and for some dogs, it's not an food reward at all, it's tug, or a neck scratch. Buzz's favorite thing in the world was to say Hi to strangers. He'd turn his head aside from a food treat if I offered it, and stare longingly at the nice lady or nice man. When I took him over to greet them, he acted like it was Christmas morning, very politely of course.

 

For food treats, I buy a bag of shredded cheese when it's on sale, spread it on a cookie sheet and freeze for several days, stirring every now and then. It dehydrates the cheese so the shreds don't get all slimy, and the dogs still love em. I'll mix up cheerios with stinkier stuff to make a sort of trail mix. Liver cookies are really easy to make, I'll send you the recipe if you like. A friend of mine called those canine crack.

 

Oddly enough, Samantha's favorite edible treat is a small piece of kleenex. Her eyes light up when I grab a tissue out of the box, and she's much more excited about that than about any food treat.

 

Let Jin tell you what really turns him on, what's just so-so, (might work inside the house, but not out on a walk) and what he really couldn't care less about.

 

Ruth

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Even though Scooter isn't a "foodie", there are a few things he's gaga about---cheese, chicken, animal crackers (I know...) :D But, since we've had him on the weight loss program (successfully), I'm concerned about how these "high value treats" used during training fit in with the diet. Seems like a lot of the high value treats aren't especially high nutritional value. :rolleyes: So, do I give him less food at his evening meal? He's not getting that much right now as it is.

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The most important thing to remeber about reinforcers is that the dog chooses what's high value, not the human.

 

There are many people and a startling number of "trainers" who believe the dog is "being stubborn" beacue he doesn't want the piece of hotdog they cut for him. The dog isn't "stubborn" or "defiant," he just might prefer a tennis ball. In that case, the ball is a reinforment that has "higher value" than the hotdog.

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Even though Scooter isn't a "foodie", there are a few things he's gaga about---cheese, chicken, animal crackers (I know...) :D But, since we've had him on the weight loss program (successfully), I'm concerned about how these "high value treats" used during training fit in with the diet. Seems like a lot of the high value treats aren't especially high nutritional value. :rolleyes: So, do I give him less food at his evening meal? He's not getting that much right now as it is.

 

You can count the calories and feed him less in his meal, you can give smaller pieces of the snacks, replace the snacks with something non-consumable (ie ball, rope, frisbee, etc, or you can start a more intense exercise program. Swimming is a good way to burn off those calories.

 

My pups get a lot of exercise and I rotate what the reinforcer is going to be. This helps in keeping them guessing and more interested in the game. If we have a day that's heavy on treats, I'll cut back on their meals. I also use pieces of kibble in training.

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One of the things I think my dogs would sell me for is canned rabbit. (usually their christmas present) They like livers cooked in the blood. They also still love lamb bites. which is smoked lamb but, it's a bit too pricey as of late.

 

Low value is what your dog really doenst like. Cheese is only accepted by some of my dogs. Fish is unacceptable to some of moms.

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As others have said High Value depends on the dog.

 

My borderjack will spit food for a tennis ball. It is his true love. He also prefers a game of tug over food. Yes he will work for food but when possible I prefer to use toys and he is all for that.

 

My poodle prefers to work for food. Cheese, treats, etc... are ok but he prefers something more special when doing certain things like flyball. If I am in the mood and I know he will have to run I will buy some cheap boneless chicken, cut into small pieces and then I take some honey and a little garlic add some water to make a marinade and then bake it. For many dogs this is doggie crack. It is cheap to make and I can get days worth out of a small package. I cut very small pieces no matter the size of the dog. Dogs don't really notice the difference in size of the treat just that it is a treat.

 

For my ACD she is all about tug. She will work for food without a problem but she loves tug.

 

For my border collie High Value changes. In a setting she is comfortable she loves to play tug. In a place she is not so confident in I have to use food and any kind will work - to her food in general is high value. When possibly I use a food tug and work on getting her to play tug. For Tempe I know she is ok if she will play tug.

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If you're looking for cheap high value treats try itty bitty bits of cooked liver. Others in my rotation are string cheese hot dogs and moist dog food rolls . Kipp and Kenzi will both work very happily for kibble in low to mid distractions. I up the value if I think there many be stronger distractions.

 

From time to time I go to pick up a package a beggin' strips or similar treats. Then I flip it over, read the ingredient label and set them back on the shelf. It's usually cheaper and much healthier to give them "human" food such as bits of meat or cheese.

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I often take care of my neighbors dogs. She seems to be clueless on the food area and treat area. Her 3 dogs are Fat fat fat! she free feeds beniful something and has beggin strips sittin on her counter that i give them when they come in at night. OMD do they smell strong. I like my neighbor really well but don't know her well enough to start educating her on dog food yet or her use of beggin strips but what I'd most like to tell her is her house smells like a giant beggin strip.

I stole 2 B. strips one night to give my dogs....they were inlove with them. But that's about the only time they're ever going to get something like that. I freaks me out how strong they smell.

If your dog really likes them I see nothing wrong with breaking them up in tiny pieces and using them as training treats. But don't leave the open bag on the counter or you friends and fam will notice!!

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The only time Daisy has ever broken concentration in agility class is when the instructor brought out liverwurst as a treat for the dog she was working with just then. We were literally working on the other side of a huuuuge warehouse when Daisy smelled that stuff. She immediately broke out of her run and sprinted around the gates to jump up on the instructor. Quoth the instructor "this might be too high value a treat for Daisy."

 

If I am in the mood and I know he will have to run I will buy some cheap boneless chicken, cut into small pieces and then I take some honey and a little garlic add some water to make a marinade and then bake it. For many dogs this is doggie crack.

 

Is it wrong that this recipe sounds delicious to me?

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I stopped with the Beggin strips when I read what was in them. It's like I tell my kids, you can't eat that it's full of ingredients.

 

 

As others have said High Value depends on the dog.

 

If I am in the mood and I know he will have to run I will buy some cheap boneless chicken, cut into small pieces and then I take some honey and a little garlic add some water to make a marinade and then bake it. For many dogs this is doggie crack. It is cheap to make and I can get days worth out of a small package. I cut very small pieces no matter the size of the dog. Dogs don't really notice the difference in size of the treat just that it is a treat.

 

For my ACD she is all about tug. She will work for food without a problem but she loves tug.

 

For my border collie High Value changes. In a setting she is comfortable she loves to play tug. In a place she is not so confident in I have to use food and any kind will work - to her food in general is high value. When possibly I use a food tug and work on getting her to play tug. For Tempe I know she is ok if she will play tug.

 

Perfect I knew you guys would have the answers. Thanks It give me a new direction to go. Jin likes tug toys and that would prob work as would a couple of other things.

\

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I stopped with the Beggin strips when I read what was in them. It's like I tell my kids, you can't eat that it's full of ingredients.

Yeah, no kidding. Practically every single dog treat sold in grocery stores is full of sugar. I won't let 'em into my house.

 

Google "liver brownies" or "tuna brownies" and you will find recipes for some pretty high value treats (to most dogs, anyway) that you can make yourself for cheap. Another thing that has worked well or me is to buy rolls of Natural Balance and cut them up into the tiniest pieces I can. I also second the recommendation for Yummy Chummies (which can also be cut, or broken, into tinier pieces).

 

Toys can be high value too, but they're not as useful as a food reward in some training situations because whatever you're doing with the dog gets interrupted by a toy-playing session each time you reward. With tiny treats, the dog just gobbles it up and keeps working with you.

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I have a bigger problem with the Red 40...gives Maverick seizures

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I think this thread is in the wrong place. However... :rolleyes:

 

Like Alaska says - if a dog is toy motivated, it will interrupt your training session. I actually have to take away any balls before I start training with my dog, or he'll loose focus after a few minutes and throw me the ball instead.

 

I recently bought (after testing the small bags) on a ridiculous store closing sale ($11/11.5 lb.) three bags of Purina Chef Michael's Canine Creations - some dehydrated dry food - it's not kibble, it's pieces of "chicken" and "beef" combined with kibble - I use if for treats with an immense success. I wouldn't feed him just this food, nope. But I guess they're better than the rest of the treats he's getting, except the Pet Botanics rolls - but those smell a bit too much for me :D

 

P.S. The good thing - despite the "chicken" in it, Ouzo's not having any kind of stomach problems from this - maybe it's not enough chicken, or he's getting exposed to more of the allergen and not having a stomach reaction anymore. He was able to eat some raw turkey necks without any issues. For a dog that had to be kept away from chicken for almost 4 years, this is good news.

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ok guys, read the original post. He asked about "Hi value treat"!

 

Most certainly it is a treat that waves hello.

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Haha - yup, that would make a lot more sense than anything else written by the author. A high fiving treat. Or maybe it's a welcoming greeting towards the value treat.

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If you cut hotdogs in slices and put on paper towel and microwave, they turn into crunchy little treats that my dogs love. My microwave only takes about 30-45 seconds, but some others I know have to cook theirs longer. It must depend on the microwave.

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OK, trying this again...what in sam hell does a cookie have to do with Health & Genetics? DR, are you on planet Debbie again......

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Because I use a very high volume of training treats with my dogs, I'm picky. With the exception of certain special occasions, I want to be darn sure that whatever I am pumping into my dog is healthy, and fits in with a diet that will keep them in athletic condition (read: not fat!!).

 

I find that the highest value treats can be the healthiest. Just plain cooked meats, cut up really small, tend to be high value enough for almost any dog in most situations. I've used plain chicken, roast beef, turkey, even ham (occasionally).

 

I use those Kraft cheese cubes and I'll cut one cube into an insane amount of little pieces. For a processed treat, I prefer hot dog over anything actually manufactured for dogs. I just cut them up uncooked, into tiny pieces.

 

As others have said, what makes a treat high value is the dog's response to it. For some reason, all of my dogs LOVE Taste of the Wild kibble. In situations where he is nervous, Dean will take Taste of the Wild, but will refuse something that I think should be higher value to him, like plain meat! So, in those circumstances, I use what he wants.

 

The really nice thing about using the kibble is that I just subtract the amount (ballpark, anyway) that I've used for training from the actual meal. Of course, I can use it because of the value factor. Training with a treat that a dog is not interested isn't going to be terribly effective, but you don't have to sacrifice health to find a high value reward for the dog. There are a lot of healthy, high value options.

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As others have said, the dog picks what is high value. My Lhasa will do back flips for a lousy piece of kibble regardless of distractions (other than better treats). Back when we were doing classes, Quinn needed the Really Good Stuff like tuna brownies (tuna, flour, egg, garlic -- bake), human left overs and frozen meatballs. Or better yet a tug/retrieve toy. One trick is to mix low value treats in with the Really Good Stuff which can improve their value and also give you a range of treats to offer.

 

She immediately broke out of her run and sprinted around the gates to jump up on the instructor. Quoth the instructor "this might be too high value a treat for Daisy."

 

Personally, I would say that is a treat whose power can be harnessed for much good. When I first introduced a special toy to one of my agility dogs he flipped out about it. This was a talented, experienced competitor but the toy got him so excited we were reduced to me asking for him to do one jump to earn that toy. We quickly worked from a couple jumps to sequences to entire courses for the toy. My point is once he understood that he needed to focus and work with me to get the toy, it became a huge motivator.

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