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Tommy Coyote

Why did you choose a border collie?

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It sounds now like people are arguing that the dogs are really happier when they are in pet homes. So it probably would be better for them not to work at all.

 

Interesting point of view.

 

I'm not getting that fromt he discussion at all - instead I'm getting that there are multiple ways to make sure your BC is happy and has good welfare. They all involve effort and commitment, and a willingness to train your dog.

 

I agree it's wonderful -- like nothing else -- to watch Odin work stock but he wouldn't have ever missed it if we never tried. Dogs don't think that way!

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You are forgetting that historically, shepherd's dogs have always been the shepherd's companion also. Shepherds aren't some weird kind of person that never see another living being. They have families, enjoy a pint at the local pubs, go to various agricultural events, work with other shepherds on the hill sometimes, and spend much time on the farm where they are employed.

 

Farmers' dogs, even more so, aren't isolated, though many can be. If you plan to do a lot of social stuff with your dog, as Mark says, get your dog from someone who expects their dog to behave in social situations.

 

Border Collies really weren't traditionally used as watchdogs, even. They suck at that job just as much as they do today, because they are bred to see every person as a potential working partner, or if not near livestock, a "victim" for non stop fetch games. :rolleyes:

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It sounds now like people are arguing that the dogs are really happier when they are in pet homes. So it probably would be better for them not to work at all.

 

I didn't see anyone saying that. I thought a couple of people said that some Border collies are happiest in pet homes. And some Border Collies are happiest in working homes. They're all individuals with different temperaments, strengths and weaknesses. And that's not even getting into all the different types of breeding. Quinn's instructor breeds for working ability. A recent youngster of his was placed in a sports home because that was where that individual dog will thrive. There are many, many Border Collies out there that are not cut out for working stock.

 

I'm not sure where Quinn would be happier -- with me or on a farm. Probably he'd like to be with me on a farm, but that ain't happening. And while Quinn may think he is Ace Sheep Herder, he isn't. So he's quite fine where he is or he will be as soon as we go back outside to play in the yard and hang out on the porch. Nobody is making him be the happy companion dog he is. That is one of his strengths. :rolleyes:

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It sounds now like people are arguing that the dogs are really happier when they are in pet homes. So it probably would be better for them not to work at all.

 

Interesting point of view.

Sorry, TC, but I don't understand your statement. Our JJ preferred to run from the sheep if I wasn't in the round pen with him. Should I have forced him into it anyway? Just because he prefers balls and frisbees over sheep does not make him a *bad* dog. It just makes him a pathetic excuse for a working sheepdog but we love him anyway. If he had ended up on a farm, he probably would have been culled or sold as a pet anyway. If he wants to consider catching balls and frisbees as his job, that's fine with us.

 

Jake, OTOH, loves sheep and taking lessons. I don't know if we'll ever have a farm but because you never know what the future holds and because he loves it so much, we'll continue taking lessons for as long as possible. The way I see it, even if we never get a farm, we're still doing something together that makes Jake a very happy dog. In fact, all 3 of our dogs are very happy.

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I read a lot of these threads and its the same problem over and over again. Trying to deal with a dog with a not great temperment. Dog doesn't do well with other dogs at the dog park. Dog doesn't do well with strangers. Dog doesn't do well with kids. Dog gets freaked out in strange environments.

 

One thing to consider too is the fact that a lot of people post when they need help. Many lurk and just follow discussions.

Tends to be the case in a lot of dog forums...so maybe it seems like there is a 'high' proportion of dogs with 'issues'?

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TC

Sounds like you got caught up in the romance of a hill shepherd. Yes the heart of a true working dog is in his work, I have dogs like that, but when we had no sheep, they were happy to do what ever we got to do. Did the miss their sheep? Dunno, but got sheep and they seem just as happy as when we didin't have them, only now they have directed work instead of "play" work.

It really doesn't make since when you say you hate to see these dogs doing other things rather than work, when that's exactly what you do. So it's ok for you but not the general public? I might agree if the "others" happen to be bad dog owners. but that's not really what we're talking about. I feel bad for any breed that gets a sucky owner.

 

I think these boards bring people to them that have particular problems, so they search for answers and find themselves pointed to here. Doesn't mean it's the norm, it just means that we see our fair share.

 

My son and I have a saying. On the farm, the more life you see the more death you see. Not that death is taking over but it's a numbers game.

 

Same with these boards. The more owners you know the more issues are going to come to light. Most "normal" happy dog owners are not on the net seeking message boards. We are the obsessed and passionate ones here on these boards. I'm glad problems find there way here. Someone needs to help and there's some wonderful someones on here with a wealth of information for people seeking just that.

 

BTW...I got my first BC because I had been exposed as a young kid with my great uncles farm dogs, My family bought her as a birthday gift for me. I got the rest because I caught the border collie/sheep disease.

I think it was easy for me to fall so in love with this breed, I was a very active mom, and that transfered over to the dogs when the kids quit needing me so much, Not that the dogs are my children but that I have energy to burn on someone or thing, it happened to turn to these beautiful creatures.

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"It sounds now like people are arguing that the dogs are really happier when they are in pet homes. So it probably would be better for them not to work at all."

 

 

I don't hear anybody saying that, either. It sounds to me as if you want to hear that people are arguing for this, because it's an easier argument to have. In fact, I think people seem to be saying to you that this is way too complicated a question to reduce to any easy yes/no argument.

 

Strange, too, that your starting point seems to be that dogs on farms never have problems. Really?

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Interesting. There's no flaming here, but if you insist... flamethrower.gif

 

Why how did I choose mt first BC. Believe it or not it all started with a Woodstock type music festival thaqt was going to be held in N. Walses where I was a university student in Bangor N. Wales. The expected crowd was guesstimated to be about 10-12 thousand in this farmers field near the town of Llanfairfecan about a 10 min drive No of Bangor. The local residents in decided that it was going to be a bit to much for them so the constabulary said no and withheld permits. On the day of the muasic festival IU was passing by where it was going to be and saw a crowd of people. I estimated arouind 8-10,000. Thinking the rock concert had been allowed to happen I stopped and decided to check it out. What I walked into was thousands of crazy farmers and their dogs at a herding trials. I stayed and at the end of the day I would up taking an all black, except for a classic face, 8 week BC puppy home. His owner sold him cheap because he did not exhibit the qualities of a working dog. That's OK because Augie and I had years of fun together as I started on the road to learn about Border Collies. That was about 35 years ago. Augie death was tragic and there are no photos of him but he was Dog 'A'. In an alphabetic plethora of dogs with anywhere from 1-3 dogs around at any given time over the years he is Jin is Dog 'J' Note only the BCs are ordered from A-J. Other dogs had their own names like Abby, Roman and Kriko.

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Believe it or not, Border Collies do excel in activities other than herding; they even excel in activities that do not involve frisbee or flyball. Case in point:

Cowboy.jpg

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I know I came to the board because of issues, but I also have appreciated learning more about the breed and the typical strengths and weaknesses so I can be a better owner. I'm sure the owners of both working and non-working dogs have helped me to appreciate these aspects.

 

I actually did not want a bc because I was vaguely familiar with the issues. He was mis labelled at his rescue but was chosen for temperment and in most respects he has proven to be a fantastic dog. He is well trained and great with kids. He learns games quickly and is often commended for his intelligence and obedience by both dog owners and non dog owners. We tried agility to see if we could give him more in his life - it was never a plan when we got him.

 

If we hadn't adopted him there's no guarantee he would have found a working home. Indeed, without pedigree or history I wonder if he ever would have been considered. I don't think he even exhibits great BC instincts in herding or intensity either. But that's a good thing for us. In fact, his biggest issues are with other dogs and I will take note of Tommy's comment that they are not necessarily a dog that needs a dog social life. I'm a loner anyway, so perhaps this is a good dog for me, I just was trying to fulfill him the wrong way. See - always learning :rolleyes:

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You know what got me off on this - again was something that Jack Knox said when I was down there in December. And it made me very sad. He said that working is the heart and soul of these dogs. And when you take it away you take away their heart.

 

Why did you get a Border Collie? Why do you want another one? If Jack sold you a pup, so he must have thought you could provide a fulfilling life for one -despite that fact that the pup wouldn't be working on a regular basis.

 

Just my own observations - my dogs like working sheep, they really like working sheep. They also love to play ball and frisbee. When I set up search problems for Kipp at home, I frequently run Missy on the same problem because they both like search work. I've done agility and directional work with them, and they like that, too . In short, they like athletic activity that requires use of their brain.

 

I agree that working dogs need an outlet for their working abilities, but I don't think that has to be a farm where they work livestock every day.

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Believe it or not, Border Collies do excel in activities other than herding; they even excel in activities that do not involve frisbee or flyball. Case in point:

Cowboy.jpg

 

Now that dog was incredibly awesome at his job!

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Let me go back aways. It was probably 1975 or so that the obedience world discovered that they could knock the competition flat if they ran border collies. And it was true - they could win. The border collies were faster and they learned a lot faster than most of the other breeds. And obedience people began to breed for obedience border collies. But lots of those people were not interested in working ability - at all. The pesky ole heading instinct got in the way of heeling. They wanted fast dogs that were accurate and that learned at the speed of light.

 

About that same time those same breeders got interested in pretty colors. They were paying big bucks for blue merles and red merles. Anything that was different. The breeding that was going on at that time was god awful.

 

Did all of this hurt the breed? In a huge way. Before that no one in the AKC was interested in the border collie at all. There weren't thousands of dogs in rescue because the only border collies you could even find were out on the farms and you actually had to know someone to even find one to buy.

 

So now the new big thing is agility competition. They like the dogs because they are fast and bidable. Do you really think that those people care about their working ability? Do you really think they have a clue what good working ability even is? They see a dog showing eye and they think that's good enough. Come on.

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You know what got me off on this - again was something that Jack Knox said when I was down there in December. And it made me very sad. He said that working is the heart and soul of these dogs. And when you take it away you take away their heart.

 

It probably wouldn't bother me as much if there were just a few people doing agility and stuff. But once it becomes a huge sport then more and more dogs are bred for agility ability - and less and less attention is paid to what makes a good working dog.

so is the answer to split the breed again. Working dogs/ agility dogs/ obedience dogs/ show dogs. Just call the working dogs working sheepdogs and maybe everything else goes under BC or borders or whatever?

 

I think I understand what you're saying here, Tommy. It is true that as the proportion of all dogs who are registered as "Border Collies" but have never worked and are bred for things other than work increases, the "Border Collie" breed considered as a whole will have changed its character. At what point will the breed as a whole no longer be a working breed? At what point will it no longer be meaningful or accurate to call them sheepdogs? People may disagree about when that point is reached, but at some point it WILL be reached, and at that time the "Border Collie" breed will have lost its heart and soul -- its reason for being. At some point I believe we will have to rename the working-bred segment of the breed, just as the name "Border Collie" was originally given to the dogs who continued to be working-bred to distinguish them from the "Collies" who had been changed so radically by Kennel Club breeding. In my own mind I consider them a separate breed even now, and I think it would be better for the future of the working breed if everyone did.

 

For generations border collies in this country were basically working dogs on farms and ranches. Some small percentage of them were pet dogs or sport (mainly obedience) dogs all along, but the breed was not widely known, so the people who chose them for this purpose had to seek them out from working breeders, and they understood and appreciated the true nature of the dogs. They sought them out because that was the kind of dog they wanted. They did not influence the development of the breed, and for the most part they didn't want to. That state of affairs was paradise lost.

 

All that changed with AKC recognition. Recognition made the border collie an official, known breed. They were included in breed books, and showcased in the then fairly new but mushrooming sport of agility. They were shown at Westminster. Since then it's been like a rockslide rolling down a hill. People get them knowing nothing about them except that they're cute, or look sweet, or kick ass at agility. You are right IMO that the exponential growth of KC demand for border collies is at the heart of the problem.

 

I can't see why you should be criticized for thinking about this on an individual level either. Just because your border collie may be a pet doesn't mean you can't consider when and in what circumstances it makes sense to have a border collie as a pet or performance dog. Reflecting on issues like this has caused many people to change their views about their own dog ownership, as well as dog ownership in general.

 

I believe that for most (not all) well-bred border collies, working stock is meaningful to them in a way that no other activity is. Its demands mesh fully and perfectly with their skills and talents, and that is very satisfying and fulfilling. However, I don't believe dogs pine for stockwork, and I know they can lead very happy lives despite never seeing a sheep or cow because I have seen that happiness so many times. If I could turn back the clock to the days when border collies were used almost exclusively for stockwork, and the relatively few who were owned for sport or as pets were working-bred dogs actively sought out by their owners for their working-bred qualities, I would do it in a heartbeat. But in the world we live in now, I think giving a good pet or (non-AKC) sport home to a rescue border collie or a working-bred border collie is a fine thing, especially if you use your dogs as a means of educating others about the breed.

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I feel sorry for so many people that post here. They get a border collie and then try to force it into a role that the dog was never meant to fill. Its like trying to put a round stick in a square hole. Of course you are going to have trouble. And you and the dog are both going to be miserable.

 

Really? You make it all sound so black and white! I think that some people come here out of a desire to help their dog; I don't think those are the ones for whom you should feel pity. In my opinion, those "troubles" are opportunities for more education. I know this from experience, as I came to the board for knowledge.

 

I think that the sorry owners are those that don't put their money where their mouth is. One thing that is a bit unsettling about the points made by the OP on this thread is that they seem to be made NOT out of actual practice of the OP, but theory.

 

I think I understand the underlying point that the OP is attempting to make, and if correct, I do not think that I disagree with it entirely. But why argue a point just for argument's sake? If one has some new facts to present, then bring them on. This same one has been done over and over and over and over.

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Really? You make it all sound so black and white! I think that some people come here out of a desire to help their dog; I don't think those are the ones for whom you should feel pity. In my opinion, those "troubles" are opportunities for more education. I know this from experience, as I came to the board for knowledge.

 

I think that the sorry owners are those that don't put their money where their mouth is. One thing that is a bit unsettling about the points made by the OP on this thread is that they seem to be made NOT out of actual practice of the OP, but theory.

 

I think I understand the underlying point that the OP is attempting to make, and if correct, I do not think that I disagree with it entirely. But why argue a point just for argument's sake? If one has some new facts to present, then bring them on. This same one has been done over and over and over and over.

Actually I have had probably 8 rescues. When I get a dog for myself I always try to buy the best working dog that I can afford because they are always the easiest to live with. And I never breed.

 

I do know whereof I speak. And it is just awful to try and live with a dog that is a mess. Several of my rescues could never leave the house - I just could never be sure they wouldn't try and bite someone. They did pretty well as long as they stayed on their schedule and stayed in a familiar, safe environment. It was always a mix of bad breeding and terrible handling. And my experience has been that once a border collie is messed up it is really hard to fix them.

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I know they can lead very happy lives despite never seeing a sheep or cow...

Annie has seen sheep (and cows, and geese, and...); she was not impressed. :rolleyes:

 

When it comes to herding instinct, some Border Collies got it, some don't. Annie don't got it. Even our vet agrees that her calling is SAR and therapy; and so that is where we have devoted our development efforts.

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I think I understand what you're saying here, Tommy. It is true that as the proportion of all dogs who are registered as "Border Collies" but have never worked and are bred for things other than work increases, the "Border Collie" breed considered as a whole will have changed its character. At what point will the breed as a whole no longer be a working breed? At what point will it no longer be meaningful or accurate to call them sheepdogs? People may disagree about when that point is reached, but at some point it WILL be reached, and at that time the "Border Collie" breed will have lost its heart and soul -- its reason for being. At some point I believe we will have to rename the working-bred segment of the breed, just as the name "Border Collie" was originally given to the dogs who continued to be working-bred to distinguish them from the "Collies" who had been changed so radically by Kennel Club breeding. In my own mind I consider them a separate breed even now, and I think it would be better for the future of the working breed if everyone did.

 

For generations border collies in this country were basically working dogs on farms and ranches. Some small percentage of them were pet dogs or sport (mainly obedience) dogs all along, but the breed was not widely known, so the people who chose them for this purpose had to seek them out from working breeders, and they understood and appreciated the true nature of the dogs. They sought them out because that was the kind of dog they wanted. They did not influence the development of the breed, and for the most part they didn't want to. That state of affairs was paradise lost.

 

All that changed with AKC recognition. Recognition made the border collie an official, known breed. They were included in breed books, and showcased in the then fairly new but mushrooming sport of agility. They were shown at Westminster. Since then it's been like a rockslide rolling down a hill. People get them knowing nothing about them except that they're cute, or look sweet, or kick ass at agility. You are right IMO that the exponential growth of KC demand for border collies is at the heart of the problem.

 

I can't see why you should be criticized for thinking about this on an individual level either. Just because your border collie may be a pet doesn't mean you can't consider when and in what circumstances it makes sense to have a border collie as a pet or performance dog. Reflecting on issues like this has caused many people to change their views about their own dog ownership, as well as dog ownership in general.

 

I believe that for most (not all) well-bred border collies, working stock is meaningful to them in a way that no other activity is. Its demands mesh fully and perfectly with their skills and talents, and that is very satisfying and fulfilling. However, I don't believe dogs pine for stockwork, and I know they can lead very happy lives despite never seeing a sheep or cow because I have seen that so many times. If I could turn back the clock to the days when border collies were used almost exclusively for stockwork, and the relatively few who were owned for sport or as pets were working-bred dogs actively sought out by their owners for their working-bred qualities, I would do it in a heartbeat. But in the world we live in now, I think giving a good pet or (non-AKC) sport home to a rescue dog or a working bred dog is a fine thing, especially if you use your dogs as a means of educating others about the breed.

Thank you. Thank you. You said it so much better than I did.

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Actually I have had probably 8 rescues. When I get a dog for myself I always try to buy the best working dog that I can afford because they are always the easiest to live with. And I never breed.

 

I do know whereof I speak. And it is just awful to try and live with a dog that is a mess. Several of my rescues could never leave the house - I just could never be sure they wouldn't try and bite someone. They did pretty well as long as they stayed on their schedule and stayed in a familiar, safe environment. It was always a mix of bad breeding and terrible handling. And my experience has been that once a border collie is messed up it is really hard to fix them.

 

I do believe that you are a great owner, so that is not at all what I meant. I was refering to the work vs. WORK argument that I read into the posts. One point that I thought you were trying to make was that border collies were bred to work, and issues arise when they are not worked. I think that you have stated numerous times that your collies are just companions. Nothing wrong with that- but it seems odd to me that you would be making such a strong case for the breed's "sole purpose". Maybe I was mistaken, and if so, I am sorry.

 

Also, I have a border collie rescue that struggles with issues, as well, so I absolutely understand what you are saying. But I think *any* dog with issues can be potentially hard to fix- not just BCs.

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In my case, at least, you've got things backwards. I didn't get a Border Collie, I got Niki who happened to be a BC. (Or more likely a BC/Aussie mix.) I didn't, and wouldn't, go out looking for a particular breed of dog. For one thing, I prefer mutts. For another, my dogs have always chosen me, or been chosen by fate, circumstance, or the sort of owner who disposes of an inconvenient dog by driving a ways out of town and shoving it out the door.

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So now the new big thing is agility competition. They like the dogs because they are fast and bidable. Do you really think that those people care about their working ability? Do you really think they have a clue what good working ability even is? They see a dog showing eye and they think that's good enough. Come on.

 

Caution: This is going to be strongly worded - I really don't mean to offend you, but this hits close to home for me.

 

You might want to know what you are talking about before you speak. You have probably seen agility on TV, maybe seen a few websites breeding BCs for agility - but have you ever actually immersed yourself in agility culture? Or are you generalizing from what you think might be right or from what you've heard from word of mouth?

 

I love agility. I've been to Nationals, earned Championships, and pretty much done it all. And my dogs love agility. They get to travel, go to seminars, get out of the everyday routine. They get to chase me down a line of jumps, they get to soar over a dogwalk, charge through a tunnel with a smile on their face. Granted, those dogs have been Miniature Schnauzers - but they were bred to be German farm dogs. It's not natural for them to weave around poles 12 times - but you can bet everytime I ask Komet to "weave" he does it and enjoys it, the way he can do it just right as to one-step it, the feel of the pole slide across his shoulder. It has given my dogs confidence, that they can do it (sometimes too much in Komet's case - but you got to love him), it has given them dog friends, it has given them so much that I can't imagine life for my dogs that consists of the house and the backyard.

 

Now, I have a Border Collie. My saying has always been "I didn't get my dogs for agility, I got agility for my dogs" and it has been true every step of the way. I got a Border Collie because I was looking for a new dog, but it didn't have to be an agility dog, I love my current competition dogs. One of my agility friends was going out of town so I offered to dog-sit for them. After spending a week with the breed, and thorough research I decided that was going to be my next dog. When I looked at Mal's litter, I fell in love with him. He was the big, clumsy goof - the breeder told me he was a "couch potato" dog. I didn't care. So what if he wanted to lounge around the house, I'd give him a soft bed to lay on. I just wanted him to be my dog. Months later and this dog is a total nut about agility. He's extremely fast and loves every second of it. I've seen none of the couch potato behaviour, but that never mattered to me. Even if he doesn't turn out to be a star, he can still play, and even if he decides he's done, he will always have a home here and I will always love him.

 

He's a BC through and through, he's been on stock and he enjoyed himself (however Summer in Texas is no fun so our next lesson is in September). But it's not an option for him to go out on sheep regularly and work. We live in the suburbs. Does that mean his heart is gone? Not even. Does that mean he has no soul? I don't think so. Then surely his quality of life is dimished? Nope. We go hiking, swimming, jogging and once a day I make it a point that he gets out of house, even if it's just for a car ride down to the post office.

 

I agree, Border Collies were meant to herd sheep - but that doesn't mean they can't live life to the fullest because they don't live on a farm.

 

4948_1085546776625_1165065709_30353672_3049132_n.jpg

Is he not smiling?

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So now the new big thing is agility competition. They like the dogs because they are fast and bidable. Do you really think that those people care about their working ability? Do you really think they have a clue what good working ability even is? They see a dog showing eye and they think that's good enough. Come on.

 

 

Well, first off, agility isn't that new. Second, the quote above is a very different discussion than the starting point of this thread. I believe the majority of people on this board would agree with you. However this seemed to be your emphasis in the OP:

 

If you are looking for a pet that you can take to social events, or to a dog park or to agility events - etc, etc, etc. Why on earth would you choose a border collie? Aren't there a million breeds out there that would fill those niches a whole lot better?

 

The title of your thread was "Why did you choose a border collie?"

 

You asked. People told you why Border Collies are so popular in sports and why they personally like owning these dogs. They didn't add and "I think it's wonderful for the breed as a whole to breed for colors, speed, whatever."

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Caution: This is going to be strongly worded - I really don't mean to offend you, but this hits close to home for me.

 

You might want to know what you are talking about before you speak. You have probably seen agility on TV, maybe seen a few websites breeding BCs for agility - but have you ever actually immersed yourself in agility culture? Or are you generalizing from what you think might be right or from what you've heard from word of mouth?

 

I love agility. I've been to Nationals, earned Championships, and pretty much done it all. And my dogs love agility. They get to travel, go to seminars, get out of the everyday routine. They get to chase me down a line of jumps, they get to soar over a dogwalk, charge through a tunnel with a smile on their face. Granted, those dogs have been Miniature Schnauzers - but they were bred to be German farm dogs. It's not natural for them to weave around poles 12 times - but you can bet everytime I ask Komet to "weave" he does it and enjoys it, the way he can do it just right as to one-step it, the feel of the pole slide across his shoulder. It has given my dogs confidence, that they can do it (sometimes too much in Komet's case - but you got to love him), it has given them dog friends, it has given them so much that I can't imagine life for my dogs that consists of the house and the backyard.

 

Now, I have a Border Collie. My saying has always been "I didn't get my dogs for agility, I got agility for my dogs" and it has been true every step of the way. I got a Border Collie because I was looking for a new dog, but it didn't have to be an agility dog, I love my current competition dogs. One of my agility friends was going out of town so I offered to dog-sit for them. After spending a week with the breed, and thorough research I decided that was going to be my next dog. When I looked at Mal's litter, I fell in love with him. He was the big, clumsy goof - the breeder told me he was a "couch potato" dog. I didn't care. So what if he wanted to lounge around the house, I'd give him a soft bed to lay on. I just wanted him to be my dog. Months later and this dog is a total nut about agility. He's extremely fast and loves every second of it. I've seen none of the couch potato behaviour, but that never mattered to me. Even if he doesn't turn out to be a star, he can still play, and even if he decides he's done, he will always have a home here and I will always love him.

 

He's a BC through and through, he's been on stock and he enjoyed himself (however Summer in Texas is no fun so our next lesson is in September). But it's not an option for him to go out on sheep regularly and work. We live in the suburbs. Does that mean his heart is gone? Not even. Does that mean he has no soul? I don't think so. Then surely his quality of life is dimished? Nope. We go hiking, swimming, jogging and once a day I make it a point that he gets out of house, even if it's just for a car ride down to the post office.

 

I agree, Border Collies were meant to herd sheep - but that doesn't mean they can't live life to the fullest because they don't live on a farm.

 

4948_1085546776625_1165065709_30353672_3049132_n.jpg

Is he not smiling?

 

Very well said, this works because you are a responsible owner. Ken

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Well, first off, agility isn't that new. Second, the quote above is a very different discussion than the starting point of this thread. I believe the majority of people on this board would agree with you. However this seemed to be your emphasis in the OP:

The title of your thread was "Why did you choose a border collie?"

 

You asked. People told you why Border Collies are so popular in sports and why they personally like owning these dogs. They didn't add and "I think it's wonderful for the breed as a whole to breed for colors, speed, whatever."

 

 

In the United States, several people experimented with dog agility based generally on the British rules. The first exhibitions took place in the early 1980s. The pivotal founding groups were the NDCA and the USDAA. Today, the NDCA has merged with the United Kennel Club leaving the USDAA as the dominant force in the U.S. world of agility.

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I didn't "choose" Syd.. I found him in deplorable conditions at just 8 weeks old and being a dog lover, I couldn't say no to taking him in. Though I admit he's been a lot more work than my black lab mix -- but he's the sweetest most loving pet I've ever had. Is he hyper? Yes. Is he sensitive to.. everything? Yes. But 100% worth it.

 

Now with this health condition (seizures), I've done nothing but worry about him. He really made me realize how much the little guy has grown on me since then..

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