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These don't happen to come in womens sizes, do they? I wear a size 4 or 6 depending on the brand, and any men's pants seem huge on me

 

I am pretty small, too, and find that men's Wrangler's fit better than women's, but then, I have no hips. They can come as small as a 27" waist with whatever length you like. Usually not available that small in stores, but in the catalogue.

 

A

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No, they don't come in women's sizes, because, don'tcha know that women don't ever stay outside long enough to get cold?? Actually, the men's jeans fit pretty good, better than the women's fleece-lined jeans that I own, which have a high waist, which I hate. My sister, who is only 5' tall, rolls her's up a couple inches on the bottom, because Cabela's had no shorter than a 30'' inseam in stock. We didn't think about ordering online, though. Maybe they come in kid's sizes?

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I don't really compete with y'all, since I don't work sheep and only really go out in the cold of February here to walk the dog. Big old jacket, headsock thing, fluffy mittens. Short walks when it's cold.

 

Those Carhartt pictures are reminding me of my days in Alaska. We had this guy Will who lived up on top of the hill all winter with no utilities. (Heat? I don't know! Maybe a little wood stove?) He lived 24/7 in a Carhartt bib and jacket and US military surplus bunny boots like: http://west.loadup.com/military/surplus/30211.html Once in a while, Will would decide he needed to watch football and would hike down and sit in our living room for a few hours. I swear, I could smell him before I opened the front door. :rolleyes:

 

Anyway, he obviously stayed whole and hearty living up there in the Carhartts.

 

Mary

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What about months-at-at-time torrential rain? I have the assortment of rain gear that one who lives in Vancouver would be expected to have, but am always open to online research/shopping binges. Specifically, I'd like to find gloves or similar that keep my hands warm/dry and still let me do things like open gates, use a crook, etc.

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I'm still searching for the perfect glove.

 

I feel your pain :rolleyes:

 

Our location is tough in the winter. Winters here range from freak 70 degree days in December or February, to an ice coated world (picture #1, Valentine's Day 2007 everything coated in 1/4" of ice; 2nd picture snow on Easter in April...really uncommon here!) and everything in between. What we don't get is consistency. In our particular location the southeast pasture gets Venturi affect wind gusts that can make it feel like North Dakota.

 

 

I'm not a jeans kinda gal so I most often wear sweats or old riding breeches. For boots it is muck boots or my Ariats with or without half chaps. If it's really cold, my failed felting projects wrap around my legs under the half chaps. Tops range from T-shirt topped by flannel, quilted flannel shirt jackets, an old army jacket (the heavy kind) or rarely, a down parka. Of course when breaking ice out of stock tanks or sloshing buckets of water around in the darkness, I usually end up needing to change at some point during chores.

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You all (except Kristi) obviously live in much drier climates than me so I won't bother to mention anything we wear between head and toes, but on the very top always goes a pile hat, and on the soles of the boots on icy days go one of the best inventions of the 20th century: Yaktrax.

 

Don't have a good solution for the glove problem. Wish I did. Always looking. Current best choice is what the commercial fishermen use: Insulated vinyloves

 

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What about months-at-at-time torrential rain? I have the assortment of rain gear that one who lives in Vancouver would be expected to have, but am always open to online research/shopping binges. Specifically, I'd like to find gloves or similar that keep my hands warm/dry and still let me do things like open gates, use a crook, etc.

 

Taiga Works is your friend (301 West Broadway). Though their quality isn't what it was 20 years ago when they started, the advances in Gore technology compensates, and their stuff generally looks better than MECs

 

I am on my second Expedition Parka from them (the first one I bought in I think about 1980) and have worn it in everything from monsoons to blizzards. The bibbed ski pants also rate, especially since the zippers on the side go all the way up and down so that you can put them on over boots and are full crotch so that you can answer nature's call without taking off your climbing harness half way up an ice cliff.

 

For gloves, either they or MEC have GoreTex overmits and then under those, you can wear the wool or fleece liners with the mit tip that flips back to reveal cut off fingers (great for winter photography or opening gates etc...).

 

Pearse

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Personal info: I am VERY small (as those who have met me can attest) so practically nothing, especially from "outdoor gear" lines, fits me. This biases what I like. That said, I am a total gearhead and love to compare the merits of various technical details of clothing.

 

I would wear practically nothing but Patagonia stuff if I could. Patagonia is the first brand I recommend to anyone. It's very, very well made, lasts forever, can take a serious beating, and the R&D they do is unreal. Their stuff really is the best available. Of course, you pay for that, but they do have web specials online, and Patagonia stuff is often available on Sierra Trading Post for deep discount. My favorite Patagonia pieces are the Regulator zip neck fleece pullover shirts (I am not sure they call them "Regulator" anymore) and fleece jackets. Most of their stuff is pretty fitted, and it runs true to size (which means that most people probably think it runs "small"), as in a 0 is actually a 0 and XS is actually XS.

 

In cold weather I am very much into layering. If it's really really cold out I usually wear Powerstretch fleece tights (REI brand) under uninsulated waterproof rain/snow/ski pants (also REI brand, in which I wear a children's size 12). On top I'll wear some sort of turtleneck compression top as a first layer (mine is Under Armour), then layer one or two of the Patagonia zip neck pullovers on top of that, then an insulated jacket (mine is a very old Sierra Designs puffy jacket with some sort of synthetic insulation in it), and on top of all that I wear a North Face Gore-Tex XCR parka. The parka I have is over ten years old and is just now starting to lose its waterproofness, but I was able to go snowboarding in it last season and stay dry even though I fell constantly. I'll probably replace it soon, either with the new version of the same parka (the Mountain Light), or a comparable Patagonia parka. Like Patagonia, I find that North Face runs true to size.

 

On my head and neck I wear a polarfleece beanie, and a windproof polarfleece neck gaiter that I can pull up over my nose and chin if necessary. If it gets really windy I can put my parka hood up. I wear smartwool socks, but have yet to find a really good pair of snow boots. I have some Salomons, but they aren't really warm enough if you're standing around. They are OK if you are walking.

 

One word about Under Armour: most of the pieces are compression pieces, which means they are pretty thick (not like a scuba suit, but thicker than normal long undies) and they are really, really tight. If you do not like to peel yourself out of your clothing like a sausage, you should probably buy two sizes up. On the other hand, they are probably better than Spanx for keeping everything under control.

 

Oops, I forgot about gloves. For snowboarding, I wear Patagonia fleece glove liners under Marmot waterproof mittens. Mittens are way warmer than gloves, and I can strip them off quickly if I need the glove fingers for dexterity.

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No, they don't come in women's sizes, because, don'tcha know that women don't ever stay outside long enough to get cold?? Actually, the men's jeans fit pretty good, better than the women's fleece-lined jeans that I own, which have a high waist, which I hate. My sister, who is only 5' tall, rolls her's up a couple inches on the bottom, because Cabela's had no shorter than a 30'' inseam in stock. We didn't think about ordering online, though. Maybe they come in kid's sizes?

 

Oh yeah, that's right, women don't go outside when it's cold :rolleyes:

 

I do have a pair of Eddie Bauer flannel jeans that I love. They have a staight leg and a in-between waist. I love the thought of thinsulate ones, so I may have to check out the wranglers.

 

The Duluth gloves are really pretty good when it comes to waterproof/warm/dexterity I've been using mine at a cider mill feeding very wet, cold apples into the press. And my hands stay warm and dry.

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I'm old school like Tea. The most "technical" garment I have is a pair of Bergaline drawers, which I use when it's cold or windy, but not too cold or windy. When it gets into the subzero real temps or wind chills, I go for the Duofold wool/cotton long underwear. Over them go the jeans, and the wool overalls. I wear wool socks 365 days a year. When it's cold, I wear one of my summer pairs next to my skin and a thick pair over them. My foot wear is insulated Wolverine work boots with a Gore-Tex liner from Gemplers, or LaCrosse insulated rubber boots, depending on conditions. Either boots will fit into my snowshoes, although the Wolverines are better. The snow shoes are by Atlas (they're moderately technical, I suppose, since they are not made out of wood and gut).

 

On top I wear lots of layers, starting with either a cotton T shirt or Duofold long underwear top. Then either a river driver shirt or sweatshirt, with a wool shirt over it. Then the top of the overalls. A Carhart barn coat goes over the whole mess. In the most dire conditions, I might wear a hooded sweatshirt over the wool shirt and under the barn coat, so that I have neck protection. I have a Filson wool cap with shearling (actual sheepskin) ear flaps. Insulated Kinco pigskin work gloves complete the ensemble.

 

All leather, including the palms of the gloves, is treated with Sno Seal.

 

Rain gear is sized to go over at least a large portion of the above. I have a Flexothane rain suit that I have really liked so far. Seems very durable and much better at keeping me dry than the Gore Tex stuff that cost twice as much. I am a total sissy about being wet.

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Oh yeah, the rain gear. Almost forgot about that. I have a Helly Hensen industrial type rain suit (heavy nylon with waterproof backing) that's been going strong for about 20 years now. I used to have just crappy PVC stuff but it would crack in the cold. I got sold on the industrial type ones when I was working for the MNR and so I bought my own.

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Not much new to add except that I try to buy american-made products & it can be pretty difficult when it comes to clothing.

 

I wear Carhartts bibs or coveralls. While some carhartt gear is made in the us, alot is made in Mexico with us materials. I do note though that carhartt's new line of nylon jackets is made in China. Someone noted their water repellancy properties. They are water repellant initially, but after several washings, most of this is lost. I suppose you could treat the fabric though to maintain this. I practically live in some sort of carhartt gear from Oct through April/May & have good luck with it. I usually go through one pair of bibs & a pair of coveralls a year though. While I am still wearing last years bibs now, they will have to go when it gets really cold as much of the insulation has been lost through the holes.

 

For long underwear, wickers is made in the us.

 

It is very difficult to find a good pair of winter boots made in the us. Most are made in China only. I do like the Muck Artic boots because I hate having to tie/untie boots.

 

I have also used the kinco insulated gloves that Bill mentioned & they are very warm. For most of my work outside though, I find that I need my fingers & wear the glovemitts. Duluth Trading sells a nice pair. Imported though.

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I feel compelled to add another post from the Pacific NorthWET.

When it's cold and monsooning, I wear this stylish outfit: rain pants, muck boots, wool socks, silk underwear, goretex pants, vest, BRIGHT yellow rain slicker with a goretex Outback jacket over it and a goretex hat to top it off. If I'm on horse, substitute insulated Ariats and half chaps for the muck boots. It all works pretty well, unless it starts monsooning SIDEWAYS like it did the last arena-style trial I sorted for, then my glasses get a bit wet as the hat has a floppy brim. The layering works great if you're working/stopping/working or riding fast/slow/fast. If I have to sit around, the dog is on the slicker on my lap for extra warmth! Goretex is great and breathable, but even treated it soaks through in a couple of hours.

 

I have no good solution for waterproof, yet breathable/workable gloves, except to carry around multiple pairs. :-/

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Uh....Bill forgot to mention his usual winter gear is shorts....! It must be a real cold day when he dresses as he explained.

 

I tend to layer, cotton turtleneck, jean or heavy cotton shirt, down vest and then my old Helly Hansen lightweight parka. My husband bought me this HH when we lived in the lower Mainland of BC and I was a rowing coach. I lived in this coat on the water in all weather. It was warm and dry, had lots of pockets, zippered both ways and had breathable vents. It came east with us and I just add more layers to it in the winter. After about 15 yrs it's lost it's waterproofing, but I'm replacing it with another just like it. That should count for something.

 

I've just ordered a pair of lined jeans for winter, up till now I've been wearing rain pants over jeans, but they are always 'too warm'. I like to be mobile so hate the quilted overalls. Can't climb over panels if I'm too bundled up!

 

Feet are in wool socks on the very coldest days but usually light socks and my Muck boots. Love, love, love these boots. Hands are usually leather, lined 'tough ducks' gloves with cheap little dollar store gloves inside on real cold days. (hard to describe these gloves as they are very tiny and stretch alot to wear, so are tight to the hand and fit under regular gloves easily)

 

With wearing a turtleneck that part stays warm although I usually am zipped up to my chin or wear a scarf. I have a touque on my head over my ears, or a fancy fur hat my husband gave me one year. I can fasten it under the chin in the wind. The touque usually slips off if I'm working bent over...... I have a number of knitted wool headbands for less cold weather....(old dyeing experiments)

 

On days with little action but real cold, we have a couple of old Arctic down parkas I can really hide in. These are only good for walking slowly as they are so bulky.

 

What I really hate is having my glasses steam up if I'm too hot, or walk into the lea of the wind, or even into the shelter. Can't take them off as I'm blind without. If they can come up with something to keep them frost free I'd be happy!

 

Nancy in Ontario

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Uh....Bill forgot to mention his usual winter gear is shorts....! It must be a real cold day when he dresses as he explained.

 

Hi Nancy,

 

I will be in the full regalia today, and probably for the next five to six days by the sounds of things.

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