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Guest doggoddess2006

Toddler and Dog Problem

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Guest doggoddess2006

My son has taken to trying lay on top of our 14 week old male pup now twice, when he is sleeping. Twice our pup has growled at him.

 

Now isn't this a dominance issue as well as an

"I'm sleeping, respect that" issue?

 

I always reprimand my son and sometimes time him out. As well as trying to explain to him to please respect our dogs.

 

My Q is should I be punishing the dog also and if so how?

 

Now, I have repriminded the dog for growling. Although I understand why he did it(our son was acting in appropriately towards a sleeping animal) and also realize that serious(non-playing)growling is always a precursor to biting.

 

So I'd really like to get a handle on this now before it goes bad.

 

Thanks in advance!

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Your son weighs more than your pup, and it probably hurts! He is trying to tell your son, but they don't speak the same language.

 

You should not allow this situation to happen. Only allow your son and dog together when you are supervising and can prevent your son from hurting your pup, and teach both of them appropriate manners.

 

You also need a crate for your pup that is in an off limits place from your son. He has got to have a "safe" spot.

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Guest doggoddess2006

I agree. I put him in the crate and all he does is cry. He used to love his crate.

 

But isnt it a dominance issue also?

 

Especially since he is growling not yipping in pain?

 

It happened when my husband was with them and I was in the er, bathroom.

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I always reprimand my son and spank him and then time him out. As well as trying to explain to him to please respect our dogs.
Wow, that is a lot of punishment for a toddler! I think I would put the puppy in a crate or behind a gate when he's napping. I found that when my boys were toddlers they understood my instructions and wishes more clearly when I explained things calmly in advance rather trying to explain in anger once things had escalated out of control. I would closely supervise the child and the puppy when the two of them are together.

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I think at this age he is probably just annoyed.

 

He needs to learn that crate time is quiet time. I know that it is easier said than done, but you've just got to ignore the whining. It also helps to give him something to do - like a frozen stuffed kong to chew on. Moisten some kibble, stuff a rubber kong toy with it and freeze it for a couple of hours. It should give him something to do besides whining for a little while :rolleyes: .

 

Do you do much training with your pup yet?

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Guest doggoddess2006

Thanks for your suggestions. My son can be a bit hard headed at times. My husband and I tried the explaining route...

 

I have been giving our pup treats when i crate him,but they donot seem to work anymore. He growls and barks in a demanding tone of voice, Trying to jump up and down and get out.

 

Training; he has some of the basics down:

Sit, Come lie down(so-so).

 

Tricks:

 

Give kisses

Shake

Goes down the slide at the childrens park, if you say, "Want to go on the slide?"

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I would not punish the dog too much as much as I would be annoyed with myself for alloweing the interaction. Your pups needs a safe place to sleep, be it a different room or a crate.

 

He hates the crate because he sees it as a punishment when instead he needs to be made to understand that it's an OK place to be. Try feeding him in his crate, giving him his favorite treats in his crate, slowly train him to enjoy it. Do this various times in the day until he runs to his crate for a yummy treat.

 

And until he likes it, monitor your toddler closely when your pup is sleeping, he should not be allowed to lay on your dog. By allowing it to happen, you're setting up your dog to fail....miserably.

 

Maria

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Being hardheaded is what toddlers are all about. I would include your son in caring for the puppy and try to help him develop empathy and kindness toward him. It's not something toddlers have a lot of at that age. My boys learned the parts of the body on our Cocker Spaniel and they were gentle with him as he was with them. But I was always there to supervise just to make sure something didn't happen. One of my adult friends had a terrible scar on her face from a childhood dog bite.

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Guest doggoddess2006

I'm sorry for the misunderstanding, but I never use the crate for punishment. I always toss a goodie in there or a yummy toy when I put him in there.

 

The reason he hates being in there is because he wants to be out with the other dogs and us and believe it or not my son. He is crazy about him. As much as the boy annoys him at times.

 

 

You're very right it is my fault it happened. I thought my husband was watching them while I was in the bathroom, and well.. he wasn't.

 

I will lighten up on my son. Thanks guys.

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I admire you for taking on the job of being mommy to a toddler boy as well as a toddler dog. I had forgotten that puppies are as much work as a real baby! My teenage sons and my husband were wonderful helpers when Jack was really young, but the fact remained that when everyone left for school and work, Mom was the one left to be the puppy caregiver. I hope your husband pitches in so you can have time away from being a boy/canine mom in order to recharge your batteries.

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Well, it's good to hear he's crazy about your son!

 

And I'm not a mom, but I would assume toddlers need their rest or else they're grumpy, it's very much the same with animals.

 

Be consistent, don't give in to his whining. Sometimes the more over-tired a pup is, the more he acts out or seems hyper. So he may be acting dominant (and he even could be) but in that situation you need to cut him a break AND supervise the interaction...and same for the toddler, after all, who doesn't want to sleep with a puppy??

 

I still try using mine as a head rest now and again.

 

Good luck!

Maria

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Another thing in addition to what everyone else has mentioned - do not punish growling. Often punishing this form of communication can backfire and you end up with a dog who won't give a warning before biting because he associated the punishment w/ the growl, not with the emotion he was feeling at the time that caused the growl.

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Wow alot of advice. Thanks guys!

 

Yeah we all go to the playground everyday and then to the field for the pups to run. Then at 1pm everyday it is naptime. We all nap for 2 hrs. I have fibro and probable MS so we all love our sleep!

 

PS

I will do as you say about the growling. Do I just ignore it then?

 

PPS

How do I get one of my pups pic's for an av? I cant figure out how to do that. I've been able to do it on the other boards..

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My nephew is just 7 last week.. he knows that a growl is a warning and means back off!! I found that it took him to 6 to really understand this.

I dont let my niece and nephew unsupervised with the dogs ever.

Doing rescue I have %75 of my Border Collies coming into our care with bites on children under 16. These are ALL Border Collies. Most of them bought from breeders and raised in the home with the children.

I just had a dog recently who was 3, he was raised with 2 kids . They were 1-3 when he came at 3 months old. The kids loved the dog, the parents called it "harmless pestering" following him around, laying on him ect. , the dog started to growl and then eventually after a couple of yrs to bite. It esculated to the point that he started reacting to other children outside the home. We talked to them about management and rules with the dog and after a week they actually saw a improvement.. but.. unfortunately the damage was done, the dog no longer trusted and he had to go... he now resides in a wonderful adult home with no isses..

Good advice from Maggie Dog.. never correct a dog from growling you will take away the warning.. dont ignore it heed it! (at least in this situation with the children)

Make it simple the puppy sleeps in its crate That is its bed and safe place when interaction cant be supervised.

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Have you tried crating your son?

 

Just kidding.

 

But, seriously, have you?

 

Little boys have to be taught to be G-E-N-T-L-E with the puppy. Every very little boys can learn that lesson. And they can be put in time out if they aren't following the Be Gentle room.

 

Also, a smart thing to learn is never to get in the face of a sleeping dog anyway. You don't want the dog to wake up and be shocked to see someone in its space. That's just a good rule for kids to learn. By the time your pup is six months old he will be quick enough and big enough not be threatened by a toddler. Just protect him for a few more months.

 

I've got two BC's and two very dog savvy boys who all love each other very much. But both dogs and kids had to learn to the rules and respect each other a little.

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Guest TheRuffMuttGang
Originally posted by books:

I'm confused here? Are the OP and BG the same? If so, why two usernames?

Yep! :eek: :rolleyes:

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(sticking my neck out here...)

 

Yes, they are the same person. Seems to me that she felt she got off to a bad start, and started over again. No biggie. Let's please give her a chance and help her out here. She's never owned a BC before (I don't think), and she has a pup who is growling at her very young child. This could potentially be a big problem, and we might be able to help her fix that.

 

BG - Can you tell us what you've been doing in the way of crate training? I understand you're trying to make the crate a positive place to be. That's great. That's the right idea. However, when the pup is whining, how are you handling it? Are you letting it out? Are you telling it to shush? Are you tapping the crate with something and growling at the pup? I think getting the pup fully crate trained would be a great place to start in starting to get a handle on this before it goes anywhere else.

 

Jodi

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What about, in addition to all the great training tips already mentioned, finding a distraction that is appropriate for your toddler.

Sleeping puppies are almost irresistble. What about getting a stuffed border collie for your child, one that can be his very own dog. When the real puppy naps, he can have his own "puppy" to play with or nap with. With puppies and little kids I've had good luck redirecting them to something appropriate.

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If I'm not mistaken, I believe she has 2 puppys (Popcorn and Pepper, right?). Also, my fear is the age of the toddler. Some children just aren't ready for a dog (or two?) till they get a bit older, especially one (or two?) that will be large and active like a BC.

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I only asked because, it is my understanding that there are two puppies in the household. Is that correct? I can't even imagine taking on the task of having a toddler and providing two border collie puppies with enough physical and mental stimulation, as well as individual one on one time. What a task!

 

I would think that the two pups must play together and there must be a lot of roughhousing. Your toddler is probably about the same size as they are and the pups have got to learn to respect him.

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