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releasing registration papers with rescue adoptions

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Yes, lets go back to the original issue.

 

She is legally signed over to me, period. The legalities are covered. The appropriate people have been contacted.

 

I don't have any intense need to see her in a performance home for *me* or for the organization to get a "name" for providing great dogs, or for any other self-serving reason. I want her in a performance home because she intelligent, smart, and talented, and will *enjoy* that being pursued.

 

There are always possibilities that something will turn up later that precludes that - that is possible on *any* dog, from *any* source. At this point she is well ahead of even a pup from any breeder frankly though, because she is old enough to see her adult temperament, her adult structure, and test her eyes and hips.

 

So the basics, the "testable" stuff that a breeder would guarantee for a big time performance home needs is done.

 

Her pedigree at this point is of no relavence. What she is - structurally, temperamentally, athletically is right in front of us.

 

What the future adopter/owner would do with her if she doesn't become the next world beater is relavent. That will be addressed, and the home that will get her will have the right answers.

 

What I don't like, and therein lies the "gut" feeling, is the performance homes contacting me with "what are her lines?" in their first list of questions. I don't feel a desire to inform them...feels like I am giving then directions how to get the "unspoiled/non-rescue model" from the source. No thank you.

 

I thought that was being selfish of me...a little. Maybe unreasonable. So I asked here.

 

~~~~

As for the rest of the questions and posters..... Some of you need to start some different topics, and some of you, well...you need stop throwing stones in glass houses.

 

~~~~

 

I'll post some pictures if I can get the download to work. It's not been a technically snappy week here.

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The concern was brought up that if a breeder learned that their dog was in rescue they would try to get it back and might be successful. Legally, as far as I know, this is next to impossible. I wish rescues could report papered dogs to the ABCA so that a database could be kept to show who is not breeding/selling responsibly.

 

The breeder may have some legal recourse towards the original buyer if the sales contract held a solid buy back/return clause that clearly states penalties for failure to comply.

 

The Rescue Org. regardless of what it may or may not know of the dogs origins is under no legal obligation to give any credence to the original breeder.

 

 

Why would the ABCA (being a registry) take on the reponsibility of being a policing body outside of what it clearly states in its critia to utilize its services?

(this would be an expensive and danting task for a registry to attempt and really not the purpose of a registry. I know there has been privious threads that discuss this issue)

I don't know exactly how individual Rescue Orgs. handle papered dogs, but I would assume that many if not most would take into ownership the pedigree (if available) and DO report the change in ownership to the registry.

(I may be totally wrong on this point.)

This doesn't mean that the Rescue Org. is obligated to pass the pedigree to a potential client.

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Wendy,

I can understand how anyone asking "What are her lines?" would rub you the wrong way. Have you thought about answering that question with another question? It might sound a bit rude but if anyone is nervy enough to ask the question in the first place, just ask them "Are you asking because you're more interested in a sports dog than offering a loving, caring home?" After all, you are a rescuer and you're main objective is placing said dog in a home that they'll be happy in.

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I just wanna see this wonder girl! :rolleyes:

 

Me too! I hope she can get her computer to co-operate!

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is the performance homes contacting me with "what are her lines?" in their first list of questions

 

Like Brenda said, this would bother me A LOT! I don't think the sport (or make that success in it) should ever get that important, no matter what sport it is.

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It might sound a bit rude but if anyone is nervy enough to ask the question in the first place, just ask them "Are you asking because you're more interested in a sports dog than offering a loving, caring home?"

 

Or maybe just respond with "Why do you ask?" and see what they tell you. You might get some interesting information with a more neutral sounding question.

 

I don't have any intense need to see her in a performance home for *me* or for the organization to get a "name" for providing great dogs, or for any other self-serving reason. I want her in a performance home because she intelligent, smart, and talented, and will *enjoy* that being pursued.

 

Dogs don't know if they've Q'ed or placed or what their success rate is when they do performance sports. All they really know is if they are having fun and if we're happy with them. I want my dogs to feel like heroes when we leave a ring. Heck, I want them to feel that way when we train together. That's really my first goal with them. My friends and I love dog sports but we're not truly competitive. But our dogs seem to be having a lot of fun and we feel like we build special bonds with our dogs.

 

Back to the question of papers, I would be curious about my dog's lineage and if papers were available I'd love to see them. Those little pieces of information can be neat or even useful to know about your adopted dog. Some of the people asking about lines may simply be trying to "shop" the way they would using a breeder. Looking at the pedigree of a prospective dog may be something they've always done.

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Or maybe just respond with "Why do you ask?" and see what they tell you. You might get some interesting information with a more neutral sounding question.

 

Good point!

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If the family I was adopting too qualified to adopt a dog from me, then they most likely would qualify to receive the papers if they were available. Going to rescue means that they're most likely starting with the correct frame of mind, why not allow them to know the parentage if it's available?

 

Maria

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Hi

 

I don't post often, but I lurk here a lot. I have two dogs, both from the pound. One is a mix and the other is a border collie. I also participate in flyball.

 

My suggestion FWIW to your original question would be don't even tell them the dog is registered in the first place. She's a rescue, what you see is what you get. If they ask about lines, say "I don't know" or if you are uncomfortable lying, "that information is not available at this time (just don't add that you are the one making it unavailable)" or you could ask why they want that information and decide from there.

 

The only legitimate reason (IMHO) for asking the dog's lines before they even meet the dog would be if they were somehow connected with a breeder who was concerned that it was one of his/her puppies that the owner decided to dump instead of fess up to a problem. If you know a dog is from a certain breeder, and if you don't have any sure information that they wouldn't care, I would encourage you to notify the breeder so that they know whoever they sold this dog to did not do right by it.

 

I agree with the concerns expressed by a previous poster about participants in certain sports, like flyball, whose enthusiasm seems to be for a fast dog at any cost, who might put too much credence into one fluke fast dog from a certain pedigree.

 

Another concern I would have about releasing registration information is that occassionally I get weird comments from people about how much cheaper it is to get a purebred from a rescue than a breeder. You don't want someone snagging the rescue dog because they're penny-pinching.

 

Also, its a rescue. What you see is what you get. However the dog was bred, whatever wonderful or mediocre or mystifying lines are in its makeup, that's just dry ink. They would be taking home the dog, not it's theoretical predicted potential based upon its pedigree. A focus on the lines, rather than the actual dog, might leave them thinking they bought (or rescued) a bill of goods when the decendant of herding champions prefers sleeping on the couch and is scared of sheep.

 

After they take home the dog, you can tuck the papers in with the other documentation you give the adopter, as an item of curiosity and or potential medical history.

 

But all of that is just my opinion. Sorry to go on so long.

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Pics?

 

 

And I agree, for sports, there is really no reason that her pedigree should be the FIRST thing they ask you about. See, sports people are beginning to think (apparently) that agility/flyball talent is genetic. Which to some degree it is, meaning that structure and temperament and willingness to work with people are genetic, but it's not like there's complex instincts you need to worry about if you wanted a working dog for your ranch of 1000 cattle or something.

To me, a resuce is a rescue. If I knew they had a pedigree, I'd be curious to see who was in it, BUT that wouldn't make or break the deal with me wanting the dog or not. It'd be a curiosity. Like "hey, did you know our dogs are 2nd cousins? Funny huh?".

I'd say for now don't even tell anyone there's a pedigree attached or that she's registered. I'd say "purebred" but don't specify how you know until you have someone who is already approved to adopt. Something like that. If they ask, say "she's from BYB lines" or something like that. Then say "but she's an AMAZING dog". If they don't answer your e-mail, then you surely didn't want them anyway....

 

 

These boards make me really wish I had more room. I'd love an active, healthy, lovely little rescue, BUT I live in what is essentially a 1-bedroom apartment in my parent's basement (with my SO who's declared that 3 is plenty). . . so I'm stuck for a while. . .

 

But you know, the #1 question when I walk any of my dogs around and they meet people at the agility trial for the first time, is "where's he/she from?"

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Guest TheRuffMuttGang
See, sports people are beginning to think (apparently) that agility/flyball talent is genetic.

 

I about puked one day when one of my flyball teammates asked me why I neutered Mojo, a mixed breed mutt from the pound, purely because he is a 3.7s flyball dog. While Mojo is a stellar flyball dog, I could never in good conscience breed him even if he were a known purebred dog with good working instinct, etc, etc, etc. The dog's taken CHUNKS out of other dogs before when he's gotten too worked up playing flyball. Do you REALLY think I'd want to pass that trait on?

 

Besides, he was already neutered when I adopted him. :rolleyes:

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