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krazy15k

Road trip with a bc! Any suggestions?

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In August a friend and I are driving from Georgia to Seattle, down to the south west and back. We are taking my bc with us. She is great in the car, and doesn't mind long trips. So I guess my question is, does anyone have any suggestions on things I might be forgetting to bring, or helpful hints for such a long trip? I think we are covered but there are always little things you remember once you are already gone! Also, if anyone has any suggestions for great dog friendly places please do tell!

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I'm interested in the replies on this topic, since we will undergo a long car ride in about two weeks, from Denver to Montreal. It's a 2 day drive each way. We've traveled with Ouzo last year from Denver to Grand Canyon and Las Vegas, and he did amazingly well.

 

Motel 6 is the one that accepts dogs without a problem, correct? Last year, since we didn't book anything in advance, we had a real hard time finding lodging in Durango (also during the 4th of July weekend... ).

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Motel 6 is the one that accepts dogs without a problem, correct? Last year, since we didn't book anything in advance, we had a real hard time finding lodging in Durango (also during the 4th of July weekend... ).

 

Yeah Motel 6 allows dogs. I've traveled with my dog a lot and I always bring: food/water dish, food, bottled water, treats, something to chew on, poo bags, and one of them pet hair removers for my clothing, since you eat out when traveling :rolleyes:

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Sounds like fun! We do a lot of traveling and almost always take our dogs. Last summer we did a 2200 mile road trip from SLC to Banff, AB, CA. What a fabulous trip! We have a VW Eurovan camper so we spend a fair amount of time camping in it, which is actually great for dogs. Our dogs love tents, too.

 

When we stay in other lodging, we stay in places like KOA Kamping Kabins (which are fun) and we actually found quite a few motels/hotels that would take dogs. You can stay in places like Old Faithful Lodge Cabins, Mammoth Hot Springs Cabins and several other places in Yellowstone. When you get a rough itinerary, you should let folks know -- nothing like suggestions from locals on places to stay and see.

 

I pack a doggie duffle that I put favorite dog toys in, along with chew treats, a couple of leashes, dog towel(s), brush, dog bowls (I also keep a spare water dish handy under the seat so that I can give the dogs a drink whenever we stop), extra poop-scoop bags, large water bottle, frisbees, balls, etc. It's not really all that big and keeps all of the paraphenalia together. We don't usually take the regular dog bed, but use some dog blankets (handy both in the car and out) and compact fleece bed. Wet wipes are also very handy.

 

I always take a wire folding kennel, too. It folds down flat and we often don't use it, but occasionally you might want to eat at a restaurant or go somewhere that doesn't allow dogs. Often we take turns checking things out, with one of us doing the sightseeing/fishing/etc. and the other watching the dogs and then swap. Because it will be August, you won't be able to leave your pup in the car -- way too hot! We have left the dogs in motel rooms (crated) for an hour or less. We actually prefer to fix our own meals and find a cool spot to eat at. (It's also a lot cheaper that way.)

 

Be sure to take a copy of your dog's vet records with you. You never know if you might need it. Also, we have occasionally used a commercial kennel for the day when we are touring things like museums and places where dogs can't go. They usually require vaccination records.

 

I hope you have a great time on your trip and take lots of pictures!

 

ETA: I usually take a jump drive with a current picture of both dogs on it, just in case of the need to make emergency flyers re lost dogs. Both of my dogs are microchipped, but I always take spare name tags that contain both my home and cell phone numbers.

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A road trip with the pups... what fun!

 

"Super 8" motels thru-out Canada also accepts dogs, as do "Ramada Inn" & "Coast Canadian".

Have fun!

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I haven't traveled with Black Jack yet (up comming trip in Oct though) but we have made many, many trips with Sage. I try to take a doggie bag with enought food plus a little extra just incase, water so it's the same, lots of toys to play with in the motel room, poop bags, treats, kong, back up tennis balls, maybe a blanket, dog bed, extra collar, extra leash (lesson learned) and anything else you can think of. I always say better to have extra stuff than not enough :rolleyes: Have fun with you trip. It's be a blast.

 

Anda, your going to Montreal? So you'll be going through Wy? Ohhh ohhhh ohhh I could see Ouzo!!!! Please please please please?

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My own favourite thing to forget: a bottle (or more - American drives tend to be longer after all :D ) of fresh tap water. Both our dogs refuse to drink my bubbly mineral water even in the worst heat.

 

The camera needs to come, too, of course. Travel reportage for the Boards. :rolleyes:

 

Have fun!

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Most of the bottled water in the US is still water, so it's always easy to find bottled water for dogs along the way. That said, I always carry bottled water in my car, not only for trips but because I live in earthquake-land now and my car has to be ready for our flight out of the city when the big one comes (I keep supplies in it because I know I won't be able to get into any shelters with my dogs, and I'm sure as hell not leaving them behind).

 

Dogs don't really need that many things for road trips. Food, water, whatever meds they might be on, something to chew on in the crate (mine don't while the car is moving but might if they have to wait in the car while I'm in a restaurant, etc.). Treats and throwing toys for ball games at rest stops. Extra leashes in case you lose one. Long line and/or retractible lead for roadside potty trips as I won't take chances near a road even with my dogs who have excellent recalls. I carry silver mesh shade blankets in the car in case we park and they need some extra shade. And it's a good idea to bring extra towels or rugs for the crates. I keep mats in my car crates to keep the dogs comfortable (they don't chew) and it's a good idea to bring extras in case someone has to barf or ate something that disagreed with him the night before. ID and whatever vet papers you need for where you're going. I keep photos of the dogs on my iPod in case anyone gets lost.

 

Stop frequently so dogs can stretch legs. Mine have been all over the place with me; the longest drive we made was from Northern Virginia to San Francisco when I moved out here. They handled it fine. We did not have trouble finding dog-friendly accomodations along the way, but we also didn't stop much (once in Cheyenne, Wyoming and once in Reno, Nevada -- yes, that's right, from VA to WY without stopping at a hotel -- I don't recommend it).

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That said, I always carry bottled water in my car, not only for trips but because I live in earthquake-land now and my car has to be ready for our flight out of the city when the big one comes (I keep supplies in it because I know I won't be able to get into any shelters with my dogs, and I'm sure as hell not leaving them behind).

 

You can zoom in and find your street. Remember the Loma Prieta quake -- the one that caused so much damage in the Marina? I have friends who live on Russian Hill, and stuff didn't even fall off their shelves. Bedrock is your friend. Also, San Francisco isn't a subduction zone, so there will never be any of those freakishly huge quakes like the 9.5 they had in Chile in 1960.

 

Recent [like, today] earthquakes in California.

 

Latest earthquakes around the world. Yep, California and Alaska have a bunch.

 

Biggest ones I've felt were Landers [7.3], about an hour away (followed a few hours later by the Big Bear earthquake [6.4] about 30 miles away), and the Hector Mine quake [7.1]. Hector Mine and Landers both woke me up, which means the shaking was pretty strong ohwell.gif I sleep on the second floor of an old wood-frame house, though, so the shaking is a bit more noticeable. After the Hector Mine quake I was sure the chimney had come down, but it wasn't falling bricks, just the sound of the old double-hung windows rattling 215.gif

 

I don't keep as much food for myself on hand as I should, in case of emergency, but I'm kind of fanatical about having lots of extra dog food, and water. And I always have a flashlight hanging on the bedpost.

 

Apologies for the threadjack --- I'm an earthquake nut.

 

Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act: it's a start.

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Vet records seem to be a must these days when it comes to the border. I had friends come to Canada for a dog show and they weren't able to get the dogs back into the US until someone mailed them the dogs' vet records -.- Other than that, have a happy trip and don't let our canuck mosquitoes eat you alive!

 

Heather =)

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We will bring with us Ouzo's vet records, proof of vaccination (rabies included). Chris called our vet who mentioned something about a certificate of health valid 10 days (or so), which costs $45. On the website of the US Dept. of State for Canada (which I found thanks to earlier posts of Allie Oop :rolleyes: it says:

 

Bringing Pets Into Canada

 

DOGS: Current, there is no quarantine for import of pet dogs. If you have several dogs, you may be asked to provide certification that they are your personal pets and not for resale. These conditions apply to temporary visits and in-transit visits.

 

Dogs may enter Canada if accompanied by a valid rabies vaccination certificate issued, in either English or French, by a licensed veterinarian, which clearly identifies the dogs and shows that they are currently vaccinated against rabies. This certificate should identify the dog, as in breed, color, weight, etc., plus indicate the name of the licensed rabies vaccine used (trade name), serial number and duration of validity (up to 3 years). Please note if a validity date does not appear on the certificate, then it is considered a one-year vaccine.

 

There is no waiting period between the time the dog is vaccinated for rabies and the time it is imported into Canada.

 

If the above requirements are not met, an inspector will order the owner to have the dog vaccinated for rabies within a period of time specified in the order and to provide the vaccination certificate to an inspector, all at the owner's expense.

 

* Note: Rabies vaccination or certification is not required if the dogs are less than three (3) months of age.

 

We're going to Montreal to see Chris' sister and her 1 year old daughter, which we've never yet met, and some of my uncles/aunts/cousins. It's going to be a insanely long trip, with quick stops in Chicago and probably Detroit, both cities I've never visted before. Yes, airplane travel would have been more convenient, but... what about Ouzo? :D He has to come, and overall it's more convenient and cheaper if we pack the whole clan (2 people + one dog) in the Chevy and drive till we're out of our minds to Montreal.

 

And true, for me, packing the dog includes packing the camera. Did I mention I've just ordered a brand new Canon Rebel XTi, which will arrive tomorrow or Friday?! :D Yay!

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Thanks guys, I knew I had forgotten something obvious...vet records. Luckily she goes right before the trip, so they will be up to date. Also, has anyone ever used those little bootie shoe things because she doesn't normally walk on hot asphalt, and I am sure she will be out and about in some city with us. Also, is there anything else besides vet records you need to cross into Canada because we had thougt about maybe going to Canada as well. Has anyone tried those solar car fans you see on tv? And do they actually work? I doubt they do but just wondering.

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Its generally pretty easy to get IN Canada, its getting back into the US thats hard hehe.

 

Krazy15k:

I used those boots on my chihuahua and on a friends retriever. They work great but can take a little getting used to, the dogs "high stepped" for the frst little bit.

 

Anda:

If you're going to be near much water while in Montreal I suggest doggy bug spray, apparently the mosquito and other biting bug populations are horribly high there this year, my brothers cat is coated in bites.

 

Heather =)

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Thanks for the advice, Heather.

 

Having lived in Mississippi for 3 years, and personaly appearing especially appealing and yummy to all species of mosquitos (of which we have plenty in the woods and parks of Denver, btw), mosquito spray (the kind for outdoorsmen!) is always present in our backpacks. I even had to spray some of on the back of Ouzo's neck last weekend, they were swarming over him and biting him mercilessly (of course he was too busy playing with balls to notice...).

 

So yes, I am used to fighting bugs attacks, but I have to say, I did not know that:

 

1. Montreal has such a significant mosquito problem

2. There is such thing as doggy bug spray! (have to check it out!)

 

Thanks again!

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Hehe, yep! We used to have a brand of dog and horse bug repellent at the farm. Like this! Not sure what the difference is from human stuff. I use off for kids on our mutt, doesn't seem to bother her at all. As for Montreal mosquitoes, my family there is positive they are mosquito-hummingbird crosses LOL, they're huge!

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Back in 2005 I drove from Pa to Az for agility nationals, 5 dogs, 5 people in a 31 ft RV. For the most part the dogs were fine each had their own sleeping spot during travel. I would bring an extra leash or two, I always travel with water from home frozen in large Gatorade jugs. Money in travelers checks vs cold hard cash easily replaceable, make sure you have car chargers for your cell phones. I would check for e vets in the places you are over nighting just in case.

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I travel a lot with the dogs and everyone has given great advice. I do use crate fans, the battery-powered kind, but really wonder if they can produce enough flow to make much of a difference. I also make sure I have sunshades for the car windows, as well as the mesh shades if I can park somewhere and want to leave the van open with shade (obviously in that case I am nearby and can keep an eye on the van). A lot of people attach a page in a plastic sleeve on the front of the dog's crate with a photo and pertinent information about the dog in case of an accident.

 

For a list of dog-friendly places, check out Dog Friendly.com. The farthest I have traveled with my dogs was from central NC to Sturgis, SD. Be sure to check what's available before you travel through remote areas or you may find yourself sleeping in the car. Red Roof Inns also usually accept pets, BTW.

 

August is a bad time for travel if you need to leave the dog in the car for any length of time. You may want to plan your travel times so that you are moving (and so have a/c) during the heat of the day and taking breaks (parked) at cooler times so you don't run into the dilemma of what to do with your dog in the heat in the car in a strange place.

 

I travel with photos (in case I need to make "lost dog" flyers) and vet records.

 

J.

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I think Baymont still lets dogs in. Fergie loved staying there because they had an elevator. She would drag us past the stairs to get that lovely ride!

 

We never have to plan on doggie stops. We're both over 60, so stops are a given. Ferg is the one who can hold it. But she does like getting out at highway rest areas or at fast-food place on local roads (we don't eat, but they let anyone use the rest rooms) because she gets all sorts of new smells to sniff.

 

If your dog eats special food (like from a feed store or something), measure out and take enough for the trip. If you get stuff at PetsMart and PetCo, take some and plan to buy small bags along the way. It's a vacation, so be willing to spend a bit more to have more room. A 40lb bag of kibble replaces at least one suitcase! And don't make any radical changes in diet - like going from all kibble to all cans. That could radically change pooping - for the worse.

 

We never worry about what water Fergie gets. The dog drinks from mud puddles for crimey sake. But, if yours drinks only your tap water, consider taking at least two big milk jugs of home water. Then sort of mix it with whatever is local. Can you tell I'm a real Yankee? I do not pay for water when I can get it from a tap. OK, when we go to the NC coast (where the water is incredibly soft from the salt and tastes odd), we take enough water to make ice cubes for our Manhattans and Martinis, to make coffee, and for occasional drinking. But I don't get water from a store.

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Oh, on the subject of letting the dog go potty. I always look for a school, church, even a shopping center with lots of green space in lieu of rest stops. Rest stops are more convenient, but everyone and their dog goes there, and it's much easier to have your dog exposed to nasty bugs there than at less-used spots. Of course if you stop at these other types of places, *do pick up* after your dog. I especially like schools because there's usually room to get well off the road, plenty of green space, and often they are fenced. I stop at rest stops to let the dogs out only as a last resort/desperation measure.

 

J.

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I'll second what Julie says about rest stops -- I consider them off limits for my dogs if at all possible. You just never know what icky viruses and such are lurking around there where so many strange dogs have been. I don't really even like walking mine around hotels that accept pets. That's part of why i just bought a camper for sheepdog trials.

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Im in a hurry, so I cant read all this, but I wanted to say a few things we take with us.

 

1. First Aid Kit (for the dog)

2. Bottled water with a squirty thing on top to minimize dribbling if we give her water in the car.

3. Extra leash

4. Soap to wash her (we camp, so she's always getting in nasty water)

5. Rabies certificate, Vet Records (also, for camp grounds)

6. Dog Tag (with cell #, name, that dogs traveling ect)

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A few additional thoughts / cautions from a high desert - mountain traveler:

 

*Bonine: administer before the windy mountain pass roads; skip the prior meal to avoid stomach upsets

*Small water tin--paper cups don't quite cut it; clue in to your dogs need for poddy stops

*I'm going to get some dog shoes--watch for / avoid hot pavement/cement but the shoes could help in case it's hard to do

*extra tags for extra collars, if the dog is not chipped (i take / use both a flat leather and a chain; both are tagged).

*dryer softener papers (brain is stuck at the moment) - put one on the dog's collar and you have instant bug repellent without deet worries

*window shade: sometimes the part of the car that the dog is confined to is in the sun for miles / hours which is uncomfortable even with AC

*blanket: sometimes the dog is in the car overnight and it does get surprisingly cold in some places at night; dog has shed it's winter coat

*a caution: I don't recommend allowing your dog to go into the swift parts of the river....good to think ahead. If your dog swims in the rivers, you may think/rethink removing it's collar. It can get snagged if the dog loses it's "balance" and goes downstream.

*Caution: don't let your dog walk around hot spring areas--it will easily burn their pads

*Caution: don't let your dog walk on hot cement; it can burn easily burn their pads.

 

I think that's it.....Safe journeys!

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Oh, on the subject of letting the dog go potty. I always look for a school, church, even a shopping center with lots of green space in lieu of rest stops. Rest stops are more convenient, but everyone and their dog goes there, and it's much easier to have your dog exposed to nasty bugs there than at less-used spots. Of course if you stop at these other types of places, *do pick up* after your dog. I especially like schools because there's usually room to get well off the road, plenty of green space, and often they are fenced. I stop at rest stops to let the dogs out only as a last resort/desperation measure.

 

J.

 

 

I *love* schools and we make it habit to investigate the various college campuses, which are sometimes, often times, the most interesting places to site see in the small towns. ....and great places to walk/run ....

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