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Found 63 results

  1. Guest

    Adopting 12 week old bc

    Hi, I appreciate this might of come up in previous feeds, but I can't find specific answers. We are about to adopt a 12 week old bc puppy. It hasn't had much excercise up to now and current owner isn't coping with it. I was trying to find out how much excercise we can safely give him a he developes. I have in the past gone with the rule of thumb 5mins for every month, but im not sure if that is sufficent for a bc? Can anyone advice? Also, I've read that bc need a lot of mental stimulation, can you advice on what we can do? We already have two 15 year old westies, who have short walks and play fetch & find, good game for their breed, is this good for bc? Or can you suggest something for herders? Many thank in advance
  2. Hi everyone! I’ve been a longtime (and I mean really longtime) lurker here, but never made an account till now! So hi! I live in southern Ontario, and at the start of September I’m about to pick up my first border collie! 1. I need some naming help! Hes a male blue merle who’s got lots of nice big spots on him (see photos) Right now I’m really liking the names River, Haiku, Dipper (as in the Big Dipper constellation — I have a cat named Orion), and Quinn (this one the least). I like the nature/outdoorsy names for sure. I like how River reflects his blue but im not totally set. And other ideas?? 2. Advice for when I first get him Ive gone through the various first time/puppy threads but I’m just wondering what you would suggest as the first things I should do with him! Trainingwise, socialization, leash, etc. I’m hoping that he’ll be able to be off leash, to be outgoing and not fearful.. any thing I can do to start shaping that? (Obvs some pups are more sociable than others, but there are things we can do to help!) i grew up with 2 Siberian huskies so I’m well aware of the whole “when your dog is smarter than you...” complex. Thanks in advance!
  3. Hello! I posted about my beautiful Merle Border Collie female, Rogue, weeks ago. I feel that it’s only right to update her progress on this forum and gather some more information/advice via comments because they helped immensely! Compared to where she was when the last post was written, Rogue has truly blossomed into a wonderful dog. She is so loving. She has stopped submissively urinating for the most part, and only does it in small quantities when she is extremely frightened (i.e. stranger comes into home and she is caught off guard). She roams off leash in our yard and does extremely well with listening and staying close. She definitely knows who her people are! She loves to burn energy. Sometimes when a man asks if they can pet her, I will make them stand where they are and not approach her. She will go up to sniff him with excitement and apprehensiveness, with her tail slightly between her legs, but will open up upon realizing that he means well and just wants to pet her! We had a friend over just the other night who happened to be male, and she ran right up to him and sat between his knees so he could pet her. We always tell our male counterparts to not go up to her, even though it can be hard because she is such a beautiful dog! She approaches many more people now instead of scurrying away. We are so proud of her progress! She likes to spend time in her kennel. We leave the door open to give her access whenever she likes. She will sometimes take a bone into her kennel and chew it in there. Sometimes she spend a bit more time than we would like her to spend in her kennel. I am home for the majority of the day, everyday. Therefore, I leave the kennel door open so she can come out if she would like. She typically comes out and roams the house freely when I am home, but tends to recede back into her safe space when my fiancé gets home from work. He has been doing his best with not approaching her, and mostly just living out his daily routines in front of her. She is comfortable with me, but sometimes I will hear some rattling and find her in her kennel, head poking out of the entrance rested on top of some toys. I leave her be. I want her to feel that she has a ‘safe space’ that’s all her own and she never has to feel scared in. But I will always keep the door open so she knows she can come out. She’s been coming out more and more each day when he is home. Hopefully in a few weeks, she will be able to approach him without as much fear! It has been a long process but she has adjusted little by little, and it is truly awesome to sometimes sit back and think about how far she has come and how far she can still go! I love my Rogue!
  4. Hey Hey, Kilo and I would first off like to say thanks for welcoming us into this wonderful community. Kilo is my first BC and is 4 months old. He's a joy to have and I'm learning as much from him as he is from me everyday. It's been a learning curve, but he's nearly house-broken, he knows MANY basic tricks (Sit, Down, Paw, Other Paw, Roll-over), and I'm working on introducing him to the Halti. Before anyone says anything in regards to my choice to keep him as a companion pet, I have done my research and am aware of the high energy and drive behind this breed as well as their needs to be worked and mentally stimulated. Also, I am a (almost graduated) Vet Tech. Currently our schedule looks like, as I'm in college (well exam time for 2 more weeks): Morning (upon wake up at 6:30-7:30am) a 10-15 minute walk outside to get him a chance to use the bathroom he gets his breakfast in a Kong Gyro treat puzzle ball while I eat my breakfast and get ready for class 5-10 minutes of trick training/practice in crate with frozen peanut butter to top the rest of his breakfast in a standard puppy Kong. (I don't leave till almost 8-9) Lunchtime (12-1pm) 20-30 minute walk break from crate to play fetch or play with toys and cuddle 2-3 baby carrots in crate for afternoon Early Evening ( following class at 4-5pm) 1 hour + of walking and fetch/run in a fenced soccer field depending on weather Dinner in Kong Gyro Training of tricks Play throughout the evening Bathroom breaks as required throughout the night Before Bed (9:30-10pm) 20-30 minute walk for bathroom and to wear off any last energy crate at 10:30pm (he tends to sleep through the night fine) I'm just here to see what else, as I'll be out shortly for the summer, I can do with him or teach him. I'm interested in getting him the Jolly Ball Egg to kick around our backyard at home with my parent's dog (12 year old miniature cockapoo). Also, I'm looking to get into running again this summer (a knee injury threw me off track this past year) so that I'm back up to par for next summer to start running with him (so that he doesn't over-stress his growing joints) and I'm looking to build him an agility course also to start next summer. Currently,m we are working on the stay command, not chasing my cat (2 year old tuxedo cat) and, as I said, slowly working on integrating the Halti so we can progress to having him focused and WORKING while we are on walks. This schedule seems to work best for us both, but I'm up for any additional thoughts on providing added enrichment. Thanks from both of us,
  5. I have a new dog and I've had him about a week. Friends found him and could not find his owner, so I brought him home. When they found him, he appeared to have not been taught any commands you might teach any dog. Down, sit, stay, etc. They had worked with him on 'sit' when I brought him home. This boy (Waddie) has very few god manners. He did come house broke, but he was putting his feet on the kitchen counters. In the past week, he has come a long way. He sits, goes in the crate without a battle, doesn't jump on us nearly as much, and is learning 'stay'. And rarely puts his feet on the table or counters. I am trying to get him to stop trying to climb in the chair demanding attention from me or the kids. If I push him down, he just comes back up. The only cure is to put him out or in the crate. I do not want him to learn being obnoxious is how you get to go outside. Our older dog trained my husband to let her out when she wanted out by annoying him. He does not know down, stop, or no. He is the first dog I have had to train that wasn't a puppy when I started. He is about a year old according to the vet. What can I do to get this behavior to stop?
  6. Hi everyone, I have a 7 month border collie puppy named "Gogo" and he has changed my life. I want to play with him and make him happy. I want to help him get his endless energy out. So I tried to play fetch with him. But I have encountered several setbacks during the training. I have tried lots of methods but none of them seem to work really well. He only drops a ball when I have no eye contact with him. When he does bring it all the way back to me, I'd throw it immediately to continue the game. But if I do look at him on his way back, he stays away from me and won't bring it all the way back. Shall I just never look at him while playing then? When he has the ball and is away from me, I would ask him to "release" the ball. But he seems very reluctant every time. If he drops it and I try to approach it, he will pick it up again. In such situations, I tried to ask him to "release" again. It sometimes work, sometimes doesn't. When it doesn't work, I'd go back to my bedroom and close the door -- as a signal that "no release no game". He will learn the lesson for the next few minutes but return to the old patter before. I've tried treats. And treats don't work for him in play sessions cuz his attention is so fixated on the game/toy. I've also tried playing with two balls, he would drop the ball without any cue, but he would drop the first ball very far from me on his way back, and has his attention fixed on the ball in my hand. What have I done wrong? Or what shall I do better to do the "perfect" fetch? Please help us!~ Thanks a lot!
  7. Hello BC Community- This is my first post. I have read hundreds of yours. I was hesitant to start a new post. I suspect that what I am experiencing is not unique, yet I simply have not been able to find a thread that matches exactly what is happening with Ryder. Since I am nearing a heartbreaking decision of perhaps having to re-home, I decided to take a risk and throw out my case study to see what I can learn from your expertise. The DOG: 9-month-old Border Collie x Golden Retriever (three-quarters BC). I purchased him from a 'breeder' and have had him since he was 4-months of age. Whip smart (of course), highly responsive, very affectionate (a cuddler) with his herd, super-glued to his alpha (me), high drive, high energy, not seemingly timid or anxious. Beautiful- RED bc markings. Obedient in low-to mid stimulation environments (sit/stay, down/stay, "bed", "watch me", loose leash, plus a few tricks). The BEHAVIOR: 'Aggression' toward humans he does not know only in certain, specific but unpredictable situations. Aggression expressed as fierce growling/barking, rushing, leaping to shoulder height and 'porpoising' (bumping with nose) if especially aroused. He has not (yet) bitten nor snapped nor shown any nipping behavior in play. Behavior first started at about 5-months when people would pass our front yard. But over the past few months, it has spread to other areas (a vacation rental, a lakefront picnic spot, a sand dune area where we had been hiking/picnicking, a campsite). Most interesting to note- the dog does NOT exhibit this behavior in new situations. If he is entering new space anywhere (a new neighborhood walk, a park, a new hiking trail, a cafe, a Saturday market) he does not show any aggression or anxiety toward strangers and can be approached and touched with growling, crouching or showing any distress. Also, once the 'intruder' has been introduced into the herd, he accepts strangers easily with no further signs of anxiety or aggression. Last, he has recently begun to show high reactivity to cyclists. The ENVIRONMENT: We are a family of two adults; two older kids and one elderly Golden Retriever. We live in an urban neighborhood (lots of pedestrians, cyclists). I am not inexperienced with animals and started Ryder on basic obedience early. He has never been allowed to wrestle with our kids, resource guard, lie on furniture or show any dominant behavior with our family. He has had an average amount of socialization for a family pet (likely not too much, not too little). I'm sure he is not getting as much exercise as a full BC needs but he gets more than the average pet. It consists of a 45 minute jog each morning with 2-3 additional frisbee sessions a day. This is normal routine but we also take the dogs to the river (he loves to swim) at least once a week, take them hiking whenever possible, etc. Last- I have interviewed 8 trainers and paid for a two hour consult with one (worthless). One camp (positive only) tells me I must ALWAYS do what the other camp (pro-correction, strong leader, pack leader types) tells me I must NEVER do (and vice versa). Aggression towards humans is a dead serious issue and I am terrified that I will do the wrong thing and make the situation irreparable. My QUESTIONS: Has anyone experience this very specific type of stranger directed aggression ( a term borrowed from James Serpell)? What are thoughts on use of the e-collar (maybe even Vibration only stim) in a situation like this in order allow the dog off-leash freedom while maintaining safety for all involved? If yes, any favored resources for HOW to do e-collar training the RIGHT way? Do you think this is a TRAINABLE issue or one that realistically will need to be managed (on leash, making sure to avoid triggers/situations the dog can not handle) the rest of his life? Last, if this behavior (fierce protection of his herd against intruders) stems from hundreds of years of selective breeding and is part of this dog's deepest breed imperative- is it FAIR or RIGHT to ask a dog like this to be forced into the job of urban family pet? Or, is the most loving thing to do (yes, it would break my heart) to look for a home where this behavior would be an asset (e.g., livestock guardian) versus an unacceptable liability? For anyone still with me after this lengthy missive, THANK YOU. I would be extremely grateful for any counsel this group would be willing to offer. Jennifer & Ryder
  8. Wrigs2009

    Bud Williams Method

    Hi everyone, I've been reading some of these boards, and there seem to be some very knowledgeable people on here. I have not seen very much on Bud Williams or his method and wanted to see if anyone knew about it or has had any experience with it. I have two border collie puppies that I wanted to train in this way to work cattle instead of for something like trials. Below are a couple of links. First one to an article I found about Bud Williams and the second to his website. http://managingwholes.com/stock-dogs-1.htm http://stockmanship.com/ Thanks in advance.
  9. I'm sure I've seen some discussion on these boards about this, but I'll post for some ideas. My 5 month old BC mix Cricket will sometimes bark and lung at people when we walk him. He doesn't do this every walk. He also really seems to like people, and is all wagging tail and soft ears when people approach him directly to pet him. He reacts when we're walking and people are striding past him without stopping. He also sometimes does this with cyclists and runners, but not always, and he sometimes does this with other dogs but, again, not always. I don't like the lunging and barking at people thing at all. Here's what we are trying to do - if you could please let me know if we're on the right track: I am trying to get him to sit and focus on me each time a person (dog, cyclist, runner) approaches, so I can distract him. This works part of the time, but not all of the time. He's very smart, and can tell when we're trying to "bribe" him to either do or not do something. He has a good "leave it" if treats are involved - not so good if I just tell him to leave something and don't offer an exchange of a treat. He's only 5 months, so I don't expect him to be perfect at "leave it" yet. I've also tried walking him quickly past people while telling him "leave it" over and over again, but I worry that walking quickly past the object of interest might stimulate him more. Why does he do this? He's a confident little pup and we've had him since he was 8 weeks old. His interactions with people (and other dogs) have always been good and safe ones. Why would a puppy develop this behavior?
  10. Cricket is finally 16 weeks! He had his final series of puppy shots this past Friday. I was disappointed to find that he weighed in at 13.7 pounds at 16 weeks, which seems to me to be on the small side. He's a shelter puppy, but I'd been hoping that the border collie genes would result in a larger dog to match his border collie personality Any guesses on how big he'll be? I'm hoping he'll be at least 25 lbs, but now I'm worried he might end up significantly smaller. Is it normal for there to be a growth slowdown during teething (he's in the thick of it). How much more active growth will he go through? After 8 weeks of "look at me" training and redirection, and clicker-rewarding, he FINALLY seems to be making some progress in the not-chasing-cats department. He has been rough housing with our boy cat for weeks by pouncing on him - Benny doesn't help by lying down right in front of Cricket, rolling over, and inviting play. Cricket's showing some real signs of self control and impulse control! This morning Benny was by kitchen door leading to the screened porch and I didn't notice. Cricket could have cornered him to "play", but instead he stopped, looked at Benny, looked at me, and came over to me to sit and get a treat. We're working on "down" and mouthiness. I have to say this puppy is exhausting at times, and it hasn't been all roses and sunshine. Moments like this morning though give me hope that with persistence and consistency we'll move through these puppy days and out the other side! Here he is at 16 weeks: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8XMeMYzWMjxZFpMZG1CY284S3c/view?usp=sharing His ears are normally tipped (I think they are likely to stay tipped since they haven't changed by 4 months) but they stand up when he's super-alert: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8XMeMYzWMjxSU5TTllsUXFrd2M/view?usp=sharing He looks worried because we're at the vet, waiting for his 16-week check-up.
  11. Hello dear everyone! I just got my puppy -- Gogo -- last Friday and I've been learning so much from everyone on this forum about how to get along and train a pup. Plus, Gogo is my first dog ever! So big THANK YOU! After only 3 days, Gogo can already do sit, stay, come(sometimes), release(sometimes). And he is able to sit still for food until I ask him to start eating. I am thrilled by how smart he is! But I do have some questions I want to consult you pros 1) I live on the second floor of a condo. If Gogo is in his crate, he will whine to let me know that he needs a potty break. And I will take him downstairs. Since the stairs is pretty long and steep and he is afraid to go up and down himself, I will be holding him on our way. But when he is not in his crate, there is no way I can know he wants to pee -- he will just pee on the floor if I wasn't paying close attention(I did caught him in the middle of the accident several time and scooped him immediately and went outside). So now, if I know it's around his potty break time, I will put him in the crate so that he can alarm me. I donnot imagine this to be the way forever, but how should I teach him to give me the potty sign when he is not in his crate? 2) He started mounting/humping on my legs. I will clap my hands really loud and then turn around. So far this seems to be taking effect, but I'm not so sure. If you have dealt with similar situations, I would greatly appreciate any advice! 3) He seems to be afraid of darkness. When we take a walk at night he will just sit on the grass/ground and refuse to move, sometimes with his soft baby whining, ears hanging. Is there a way to teach him not to be afraid? Or will he just overcome it over time and as he gets familiar with the environment? Otherwise, I think Gogo is doing great! Although there are setbacks in his training, esp when we go outside, Gogo does learn very fast and is a sweetheart! And here comes the photos! Thanks, everyone!
  12. Hi all, new around here and looking for some input on how to train my little gal. Shadow is 14 weeks old, and overall a great pup! She is extremely well behaved in many aspects: doesn't chase children or nip them, no more potty accidents, and never complains about her kennel (stays in it all night). I live in an apartment, but do my part to make sure Shadow gets the attention and exercise she needs. She goes to doggy daycare at someones house on weekdays, and I take her out for good walks or playing fetch. Shadow has done very well with the basic training that I've done inside (sit, ground, up, stay, come). Outside is another story... Shadow gets so excited when we go for a walk that she will choke herself the entire way to the park where she 'knows' she's going to play fetch. A trainer I know is highly suggesting using the pincher/prong collar. He uses it for most of his training and is quite successful. Shadow has used it 2 times, her last time she did extremely well and was loose leash the entire walk. Not sure I want to use this, but its currently an option with how stubborn she is. The PetSafe Gentle Leader (head halter) did not work at all with her; she would just pull out of it no matter how painful it was for her to slip it off her nose. She did okay yesterday with a strap harness hooked in front, but today she pulled quite a bit on it. She can be very good when coming back from the park playing fetch and loose leashed the entire way, but I can't seem to contain this eagerness to go play fetch when we start our walk. She has come to love chasing her ball, but isn't too keen on bringing it back. She isn't possessive of it at all though. Children can even throw for her without any problems. The problem is she is unwilling to bring it back, or come to me when called. I can go over there and she'll leave the ball (she'll make sure there's distance between us), she'll sit and wait for it to be thrown again as told. If she does 'bring it back' it won't be close enough to where I can pet her. If I do try to pet her and tell her good job or reward her she jumps back out of my reach. Side note, since day one when I got her she did this whole jump backwards thing from me when I approached her (now it's only off leash playing fetch). Because of this I got a long leash to try and help. This morning I tried throwing it for her, letting her get it, take her time to chew on it, then I'd call her back. She didn't come back a single time. I had to drag her back through the grass with her harness. I would even give her treats when she got to me, but at a certain point she wouldn't even take them anymore (so stubborn!). We had to leave the park early (only got ~15-20 mins in) and she was complaining as we left that she didn't get to 'work' enough! Any suggestions on how to be able to correct this leash behavior, and help her with her recall would be greatly appreciated!!
  13. Hi there! I'm new to the forums so please excuse me if I say something that is incorrect. I have an 8 month old male entire Border Collie. I purchased him from proven champion working stock with lines behind them of the same. The dogs have lure coursing, herding, disk, dive, agility and obedience titles. I sought after a BC as a performance dog and of course, a companion for myself and my other dog. Despite his heratige my border collie has almost no drive at all, for toys, balls or prey. He is fairly driven for food but just seems lazy in general. He is a very fit boy, has been health checked and is in top health and is fed raw so it's not something health related. All his brothers and sisters, mother and father, and relatives have high prey and toy drive. However there is a few strange things about him. He is a tiny border collie, he is only 11kgs (just) at 8 months. All his siblings and parents are large big boned borders. He has large floppy ears that do not perk at all, his siblings have erect ears with tipped tops and so does both lines he comes from. He has a very long "show" coat and look which is abnormal considering he is from medium coated working lines. He also used to have bad fear aggression towards other dogs, with a lot of training he is now friendly and shy. None of his lines have had early fear aggression. He was also bread from dogs that were clear of all hereditary diseases. Everyday I have been working to increase his non-existence drive. I have used flirt poles, tug toys, rewards for fetching and games of chase to try to improve it. It has hasn't worked. When I play with him he just goes through the motions, he will lazily grab at the toy or ball and then tug until I free him. When fetching he will just walk slowly over and pick up the ball before dropping it at my feet and wait for a reward. We occasionally have successes but it's fairly infrequent. So what I'm asking is, have you any idea how I could improve this? I love him to bits but I really want to be able to do performance sports with him. Should I maybe introduce him to sheep? I have heard a few success stories from that. Also, the reason why he is not desexed is to try to help him to grow more confident in hopes to achieve better drive, I have no desire to breed him. Thank you so much! Sorry this is so long but I think it's better to explain everything.
  14. Hi there, I'm a first time BC owner, and unfortunately, I am among those dummies that adopted a BC without first doing in-depth research about the breed and perhaps started out with my puppy all wrong. I know more about these dogs now and am doing great with the majority of his obedience training, I am very precise with him and he's gotten "sit", "down", "go get it", and it in the process of learning "leave it". Unfortunately, I have had NO success in reducing his play biting, which has worsened to severe biting every time I hold him or touch him. I have never used any sort of negative enforcement with him, but he acts as if hands are the devil/and are far better than his toys. I've tried the majority of corrections, I mistakenly tried the puppy "yelp" for two days before discovering that this breed usually gets more excited with things like that. I have tried removing him from play and putting him in his crate when he bites, I have tried removing myself from his playpen when he bites me and turning my back until he calms down. He simply goes nuts and barks and yips. We are capable of exercising him daily, we have a nearby trail and dog park, and he is still a young puppy, 2 months old, sonwe do tire him successfully, but the biting continues. I am socializing him bit by bit, nothing. My hands are cut up pretty badly. I would LOVE some advice for this. We love him dearly and simply want to be able to pet him and handle him without bleeding. Thank you for your time. I have attached a week old photo of him being held by my mother. No biting back then.
  15. Hi! Three or so months ago I got a seven week old border collie/american eskimo dog mix puppy. I got him off of Craigslist, and did not know much about the breed prior to getting him, so I was not aware that they were working dogs. With this being said, I have been doing everything in my capacity to provide him with the mental and physical stimulation that he needs. I also am a college student, although I will be graduating in May, which has caused for me to not be able to devote as much time as I believe is necessary to train him. With this being said he does know most basic commands when treats are involved (paw, sit, down, stay, high five etc). Unfortunately he has a very bad habit of biting, and sometimes he will seemingly "viscously" bite others. He is now five months old, and has gotten his adult teeth in, so his bites are not always as painful, but sometimes they still are. The main issue is not that he bites me, but he will bite other people if the do something that "irritates" him. For example if my mother tries to put the leash on him she may get bitten, or if she tries to pet him while someone is preparing his food. He always will try to bite when people put on his leash, regardless of the person- but this is a habit that cannot persist. I have gone to trainers, and am currently working with a trainer whom has been very helpful, but I am getting worried because I do not want him to continue to bite as an adult, for his own safety. I know this was lengthy, but I can answer any other questions you guys may have! I usually spend my entire day with him except when I am in class, so I am normally with him about 18 hours out of a 24 hour day. I also am running out of ways to entertain him while I am doing homework, and he will always get into trouble if not supervised, or try to do bad things to get my attention. He is crate trained and house trained at this point. So to summarize what the issues are: 1. He bites other people, sometimes aggressively if triggered 2. He doesn't seem to have any desire to "please" me in the sense that my other dogs (labs) had. 3. I don't know how to keep him entertained when I am doing work 4. He bites when I try to put the leash on him, and I do not know how to eliminate this behavior (I have tried giving him treats and showing him the leash repetitively, and it has not significantly helped) I attached a picture of him, so maybe you guys can identify if he is not truly a border collie, but he has tried to "Herd" children when given the opportunity and most people when they see him assume he is a border collie puppy Another aside is that I also am not willing to give him up, I believe that it is my responsibility since I got this puppy to take care of him and to ensure that he has the best life possible, I do not want to give him away- he is extremely attached. I appreciate any help or tips you guys can give me! Thank you so much for taking the time to read this and for trying to help me! I just want him to have the best life possible and for this to work out so we can both be happy!
  16. Hi everyone: Thank you all in advance for your help and advice. We just got our male puppy yesterday. He is eight weeks old. We have a house with a reasonably-sized back yard. Initially we have decided that he will not be allowed in the house, so we don't want to encourage behavior that tells him that he is allowed indoors. Also, we want to train him so that he always goes in a specific part of the yard. This will prevent future stepping-in-poo accidents and easier to pick up (you know where it is). So, we are confused as to how we should go about this. - One idea is to crate-train him. We would keep him in his crate and take him out frequently to the designated spot, etc. The negative side to this is that he is stuck in the crate most of his day. I am sure he would rather enjoy himself more if allowed free-reign of the yard! - The alternative is to keep him outside and take the sporadic opportunities we will have to catch him in the act to teach him where he should go potty. The problem here is that he will likely develop a habit of going where he is not supposed to and changing that in the future will be tough (or impossible). Also, I have read that 8 weeks is too young to start potty training but he seems able to hold his bladder rather well and has had no accidents in his crate for the day that he has been with us. I would very much appreciate your suggestions. We do not have experience with BC and you all have plenty! Thank you
  17. Hello all, I adopted a Border Collie named Herschel a month ago. He's somewhere between a year and a year and a half old. warning: very long! He started out in Arkansas, I guess was found as a stray, was heartworm positive, lived in a rescue kennel with lots of other herding dogs in Illinois for about three months, and now is with me in a small city in Connecticut. He has come a long way since he arrived! Happily, rescue taught him really well to walk on a leash, he almost never pulls. But he was not 'crate trained' as they said -- he chewed up the plastic mat in the crate even if he had something to chew on in there, and then chewed up the horse stall mat I got from Tractor Supply, too. He also managed to pull a blanket underneath the crate up into it (I was trying to protect the wood floors, as he would put a paw out and scratch the floor and even scooched the crate over to the bed and chewed on the bedskirt! He also would bark unhappily as I was walking away from the apartment, and bark on and off while in the crate, partly in frustration, partly reacting to noise. He slept fine in the crate in my room before I trusted him to be loose in the room overnight, and is very well behaved in the crate in the car, however. He's gotten a lot braver about the city stimuli. He doesn't like loud noises -- roofers working, a truck going by close, a motorcycle -- but can manage people biking by, cars going by close. Is not fazed at all by people walking past us on the sidewalk or other dogs, either, even if they are barking at him. He's done great in large outdoor crowds, including accepting petting from strangers, even little children. (I tell them not to pet his head, he doesn't like strangers petting his head, though he just flinches, he doesn't snap or anything). I've made a lot of progress house training him, and he is not destructive when left alone in the house (He has access to the kitchen, living room and dining room -- he's only in the crate if I came home at lunch and he's done something in the house, which is about once a week) He also is generally calm while hanging out in the house with me, and is very affectionate. I'm very glad I adopted him. I plan to take him to a group obedience class, because I don't have any real experience with training beyond 'sit' and 'come.' My last dog, an Aussie-beagle mix, was so well-behaved and easy that I really didn't have to do any formal training past teaching him not to get on the couch. It didn't hurt that he was smaller (28 pounds) so training him not to jump or things like that wasn't as critical. Herschel is 35 pounds, that makes a surprisingly big difference! BUT... if you have any advice on counter surfing and barking in the house, that would be appreciated! Since he is no longer in the crate in my bedroom, the woman who works nights and whose bedroom is directly below mine is no longer kept awake by his barking. What I've tried with barking is calling him to me (or going to him) and cupping my hand lightly around the top of his muzzle, while saying 'Quiet' in a conversational tone but with an edge in my voice. Sometimes this stops the barking, sometimes not. I also bought a 'dog corrector' canister that makes a hissing sound when it sprays air (not in his face). I have tried that a few times. It startles him, and he stops making noise right then, but sometimes barks again after that, and it's like spray-'quiet command' pause-bark-spray-quiet-command-pause-bark. (I tried pretending to check out the noise/taking him to see out the window, but that had no effect) I praise him for being quiet when he stops, and there have been some times (a handful) when instead of full on barking at the noise, he does what I call barking under his breath. I praise that vociferously, because if he were to go from barking to that, it's a solution I could live with. What makes him bark? Someone going in and out of the front door, one floor below us, which happens a lot, because four others live in this three family house! The upstairs tenant going up the stairs past our apartment. Sometimes the sound of him walking around upstairs (less often). Sometimes people talking loudly on the sidewalk outside. Once in a while I can't hear what set him off. My friend Tony came over a few weeks ago, and although he had met him before, he barked and barked and would not stop when he came in the apartment, even though I tried to reassure him he knew Tony, and hugged him to show he was a friend. (This is before I had the spray to try). Once we left and the three of us hiked together, he was perfectly fine with Tony. He visited a friend's country house this past weekend, and it was interesting -- he barked at the owner of the house when the rest of us were sitting around in the living room, and the owner came back in the front door, even though he'd been spending nearly the whole weekend in his sight! But when his wife came in after a briefer time away, he didn't bark. He also barked at a woman cleaning the apartment when she re-entered the room we were in after being out of sight for a half hour, and would not be calmed. He'll bark a little at noise when we're in the backyard together, but largely isn't barking much outdoors. The one exception was when he was on leash on a hike and we were taking a lunch break, and a strange dog arrived at the peak off leash. He was lunging and barking like he was going to tear the dog limb from limb, and my friend who was hiking with me, her dog got the same treatment when he came close off leash, though they had been hiking together with her dog off leash with no problem for a couple hours before that. (I was holding his collar, so there was no danger of an actual encounter) So! That's it for barking. Thoughts? I will keep trying with the spray in the apartment if the quiet/good quiet sequence doesn't work. (It did work just now.) On counter surfing -- he got into the trash when he was bored alone at home, and then I bought a simple human latching dog proof trash can. Not dog proof when he knocked it over and got into it again while bored alone at home. So now it stays out on the landing. He will try to get to any food that's not straight up vegetables (he's not interested in those) that's on the counter, unless it is way far back at the wall/on top of the toaster oven and he can't get to it. He doesn't do it in front of me, though once I heard him trying to bother a pan of tomatoes with cheese while I was eating in the dining room. Today he ate a half a loaf of bread b/c I forgot to put it back on top of the toaster oven after the toaster oven cooled back down! Argh! I can't close the kitchen off from him, because it has a swinging door between kitchen/dining room, and even though it has a latch of sorts, I found it didn't work to keep him in/out. So is my only hope to improve my vigilance on where I leave tempting food? I'm not used to this, my old dog wasn't tall enough to do this! And by the way, I have tried leaving him toys that promise hours of stimulation -- starmark brand -- but they do not. One is shaped like a tire and you put an edible chew disk in it; he makes short work of it. I do feed him always in their puzzle balls, and that works well, though one hasn't held up well and now isn't as challenging as it started out. If you're still reading, thanks for spending so much time with this Border Collie newbie!
  18. Hello all, I adopted a Border Collie named Herschel a month ago. He's somewhere between a year and a year and a half old. warning: very long! He started out in Arkansas, I guess was found as a stray, was heartworm positive, lived in a rescue kennel with lots of other herding dogs in Illinois for about three months, and now is with me in a small city in Connecticut. He has come a long way since he arrived! Happily, rescue taught him really well to walk on a leash, he almost never pulls. But he was not 'crate trained' as they said -- he chewed up the plastic mat in the crate even if he had something to chew on in there, and then chewed up the horse stall mat I got from Tractor Supply, too. He also managed to pull a blanket underneath the crate up into it (I was trying to protect the wood floors, as he would put a paw out and scratch the floor and even scooched the crate over to the bed and chewed on the bedskirt! He also would bark unhappily as I was walking away from the apartment, and bark on and off while in the crate, partly in frustration, partly reacting to noise. He slept fine in the crate in my room before I trusted him to be loose in the room overnight, and is very well behaved in the crate in the car, however. He's gotten a lot braver about the city stimuli. He doesn't like loud noises -- roofers working, a truck going by close, a motorcycle -- but can manage people biking by, cars going by close. Is not fazed at all by people walking past us on the sidewalk or other dogs, either, even if they are barking at him. He's done great in large outdoor crowds, including accepting petting from strangers, even little children. (I tell them not to pet his head, he doesn't like strangers petting his head, though he just flinches, he doesn't snap or anything). I've made a lot of progress house training him, and he is not destructive when left alone in the house (He has access to the kitchen, living room and dining room -- he's only in the crate if I came home at lunch and he's done something in the house, which is about once a week) He also is generally calm while hanging out in the house with me, and is very affectionate. I'm very glad I adopted him. I plan to take him to a group obedience class, because I don't have any real experience with training beyond 'sit' and 'come.' My last dog, an Aussie-beagle mix, was so well-behaved and easy that I really didn't have to do any formal training past teaching him not to get on the couch. It didn't hurt that he was smaller (28 pounds) so training him not to jump or things like that wasn't as critical. Herschel is 35 pounds, that makes a surprisingly big difference! BUT... if you have any advice on counter surfing and barking in the house, that would be appreciated! Since he is no longer in the crate in my bedroom, the woman who works nights and whose bedroom is directly below mine is no longer kept awake by his barking. What I've tried with barking is calling him to me (or going to him) and cupping my hand lightly around the top of his muzzle, while saying 'Quiet' in a conversational tone but with an edge in my voice. Sometimes this stops the barking, sometimes not. I also bought a 'dog corrector' canister that makes a hissing sound when it sprays air (not in his face). I have tried that a few times. It startles him, and he stops making noise right then, but sometimes barks again after that, and it's like spray-'quiet command' pause-bark-spray-quiet-command-pause-bark. (I tried pretending to check out the noise/taking him to see out the window, but that had no effect) I praise him for being quiet when he stops, and there have been some times (a handful) when instead of full on barking at the noise, he does what I call barking under his breath. I praise that vociferously, because if he were to go from barking to that, it's a solution I could live with. What makes him bark? Someone going in and out of the front door, one floor below us, which happens a lot, because four others live in this three family house! The upstairs tenant going up the stairs past our apartment. Sometimes the sound of him walking around upstairs (less often). Sometimes people talking loudly on the sidewalk outside. Once in a while I can't hear what set him off. My friend Tony came over a few weeks ago, and although he had met him before, he barked and barked and would not stop when he came in the apartment, even though I tried to reassure him he knew Tony, and hugged him to show he was a friend. (This is before I had the spray to try). Once we left and the three of us hiked together, he was perfectly fine with Tony. He visited a friend's country house this past weekend, and it was interesting -- he barked at the owner of the house when the rest of us were sitting around in the living room, and the owner came back in the front door, even though he'd been spending nearly the whole weekend in his sight! But when his wife came in after a briefer time away, he didn't bark. He also barked at a woman cleaning the apartment when she re-entered the room we were in after being out of sight for a half hour, and would not be calmed. He'll bark a little at noise when we're in the backyard together, but largely isn't barking much outdoors. The one exception was when he was on leash on a hike and we were taking a lunch break, and a strange dog arrived at the peak off leash. He was lunging and barking like he was going to tear the dog limb from limb, and my friend who was hiking with me, her dog got the same treatment when he came close off leash, though they had been hiking together with her dog off leash with no problem for a couple hours before that. (I was holding his collar, so there was no danger of an actual encounter) So! That's it for barking. Thoughts? I will keep trying with the spray in the apartment if the quiet/good quiet sequence doesn't work. (It did work just now.) On counter surfing -- he got into the trash when he was bored alone at home, and then I bought a simple human latching dog proof trash can. Not dog proof when he knocked it over and got into it again while bored alone at home. So now it stays out on the landing. He will try to get to any food that's not straight up vegetables (he's not interested in those) that's on the counter, unless it is way far back at the wall/on top of the toaster oven and he can't get to it. He doesn't do it in front of me, though once I heard him trying to bother a pan of tomatoes with cheese while I was eating in the dining room. Today he ate a half a loaf of bread b/c I forgot to put it back on top of the toaster oven after the toaster oven cooled back down! Argh! I can't close the kitchen off from him, because it has a swinging door between kitchen/dining room, and even though it has a latch of sorts, I found it didn't work to keep him in/out. So is my only hope to improve my vigilance on where I leave tempting food? I'm not used to this, my old dog wasn't tall enough to do this! And by the way, I have tried leaving him toys that promise hours of stimulation -- starmark brand -- but they do not. One is shaped like a tire and you put an edible chew disk in it; he makes short work of it. I do feed him always in their puzzle balls, and that works well, though one hasn't held up well and now isn't as challenging as it started out. If you're still reading, thanks for spending so much time with this Border Collie newbie!
  19. I have a 13 week old puppy who I've been training since I got her at 7 weeks. First was housetraining and crate training. She was able to sleep through the night at 8 weeks and comes up to me when she has to potty during the day if she's outside of her crate. She can guzzle water right before bed and sleep 9 hours straight. She also learned to sit for things she wanted (food, toys) in her first week home with me. We've been working on down, look, touch, leave it, recall for the past several weeks. I just started duration work with her. She's doing very well and picks up everything quickly. She was good on a leash when I first started walking her around 9 weeks. She is learning how to be calm around people passing by and people greeting her. She's good in the crate in my car and at my house. She's well socialized with dogs and puppies at a doggie day care. They tell me she's confident and will play with any sized dog. I take her to cafes and coffee shops all the time and she does great. I'm honestly not experiencing any huge issues with her. Just training good behavior and teaching her what's acceptable and what's not. I feel like she's too good to be true and I'm going to jinx myself or something! Did anyone else have a very good puppy, but things went downhill for whatever reason? Just curious if this is an indicator of fewer issues down the road or if it's completely hit or miss.
  20. So an update and another question for the masses this morning!: I realized that my dog had not fully grasped the concept of me telling her to watch her sheep and I had not understood the importance of her knowing it, so we went all the way back to zero and I just walked around telling her to watch her sheep and walked away from her and them ( in a safe way) I did this enough times that when we would walk up to the fence she was already looking for them. After doing this I noticed a huge increase in her speed and when I would release her to watch her sheep I would name flanks as she took them just by redirecting her with my body, and this seemed to work.. My conclusion is that while she is sensitive to pressure I had made a training error and let it go unnoticed for too long, my question is how would one go about pushing a more sensitive dog off stock? I love posting the day before training, I get such wonderful feed back from y'all!
  21. TaliahtheBC

    Motivation

    Hi there as this is my first post please forgive any grammatical or other forms of error when it comes to terminology. So I have a 16 month old mix of the three most regularly recognized "herding breeds" Aussie, Heeler, and Border collie but the border collie comes through the strongest. With her JHD I was told she was rather keen had a medium strength in her eye and was nice to her stock. Now the problem that Iam finding myself faced with when we go for a lesson is that she holds back, like shes concerned with making an error, she doesnt do this every time but it takes a gratuitous amount of praise to get her to speed up and cover correctly, now she had a bad experience with another trainer before hand but her Tentativness stems more from her intelligence. I have let her back myself and the flock into an arena corner and encouraged her to watch em/get em and then gone back in the field and was able to see how much more focused and turned on she was. Iam going to go back into a smaller area today and see if squaring her flanks up better will maybe help her, she also thinks that when I tell her to get out that she is in trouble. Any help would be great Thank you!
  22. TaliahtheBC

    Ranch Work

    So even though my trainer offers to rent sheep for us to work between lessons I keep asking myself how I can get more time on sheep, we live in San Diego county California and there are plenty of people with sheep in the area but would it be rude to just ask them? I have also thought about just talking to ad posters on craigslist of people looking to sell sheep in hopes of networking out some possible work for us to go do, the experience for my girl would be payment enough. Thoughts or advice?
  23. https://www.thedodo.com/cesar-millan-dog-pig-1647781916.html Aie-yi-yi!
  24. Hi y'all The shelter I volunteer at seems to be having a rash of BC surrenders around the age of 6 months to 1 year. Is this the usual age the owners (who have various excuses, none of which I really believe any more) start thinking, "OMG, this thing has no off-switch"? Actually as far as I can see, they most certainly do have that switch but it is usually only accessible after you have worked their brains and body enough...just wanted to be able to give color why they might be being surrendered when I talk to potential adopters. Also...as I am totally falling for the breed (had been a GSD/Mal afficionado all my life) I was looking for some advice on how to manage their shelter time. My observation has been that they deteriorate very rapidly in the shelter, go OCD quickly and drive everyone around them nuts. I have been handling this by just breaking them out of jail and taking them out all day to trail run with me, chase balls and do as much obedience/trick work as my rather questionable mechanics will allow. The current one is sleeping quietly at my feet after a 20k run (probably 40k in his case with all the fetch we played along the way)...but I know if I move I will get that intense "What's next?" look I am falling in love with. Anyhow... Any thoughts and advice on how to manage the shelter time and prepare them for being adopted would be helpful as, despite all the farming in this country (and sorry I don't know any sheep either), there aren't any BC specific rescues around here (and I don't think I will survive the required trail mileage, fun tho' it is)... Thanks, Tim
  25. Hello everyone, We have a bit of a beginner question. Hope you guys have some useful insights! We adopted a lovely border collie puppy two weeks ago. We've been planning this for ages and she's from a very reputable breeder. She is from two parents active in sports, with calm temperaments at home. Both of the parents are great dogs. Let me start off by saying this: our little lady is lovely as well! We fell in love with her. she is very affectionate. After 10 days she was pretty much potty trained, she loves her crate, sleeps all night and responds so well to training. All in all, the perfect little border collie. However, we are already experiencing some hyper behaviour. She turns into a little landshark sometimes, bites her leash like a maniac when we go out, goes ballistic in the garden and in the house by running around and into things, to the point where she's panting and gets the 'crazy eye'. I honestly don't think it's because she's overstimulated, but just to be sure, this is what we do with her: We go out with her about three times a day, for about 10 to 20 minutes, around the neighbourhood, trying to get her socialised to everything. She gets unstructured playtime for an hour or two a day, she gets kongs and chew toys, and she gets clicker training twice a day for about 10 minutes. The rest of the time she sleeps. I've started taking 5 minutes at the end of every walk sitting down with her and rewarding when she simply sits and calmly observes things. Same thing in the house. This is not easy for her though. We understand that hyperness can be a trait of the breed, but if there's anything we can do about it now, it will of course be better than later. We live in a crowded neighbourhood, (also with lots of parks and green and room to roam), so she needs to be able to settle when we want her to. We don't want her to turn into a cardio machine, so I don't want to completely tire her out physically, especially not at this tender age, so the walks can't be any longer just yet? Any tips? Is this normal baby behaviour? Are we overanalysing? Any feedback is greatly appreciated! All the best, Two new parents
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