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juliepoudrier

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Everything posted by juliepoudrier

  1. Congrats! I also would like to see photos and hear about your training experiences when the time comes. J.
  2. Interestingly, my young dog's loose stool issues STOPPED when I put him on Purina ONE sensitive systems. He also gets a combination of probiotics and digestive enzymes, powder form, on his food twice a day. I'm not an advocate of grocery store food, but never say never, 'cuz if it works.... I'm one who generally doesn't feed puppy food. I don't want my pups growing fast or being roly poly. If he continues to have bouts of gassiness, I'd certainly consider changing his diet. I have 7 working border collies that are fed three different brands of food, depending on their needs. My main food is Diamond, but a couple of my youngsters are having trouble keeping weight on, so I may have to try other food if adding oatmeal doesn't work. As for the youngster with loose stool problems, he looks and feels good on what he's getting, no accidents in the house, so I'm not messing with what works! Diet is very much about finding the best fit for an individual dog. J.
  3. If you're repeating a breeding because the pups trained up quickly you're risking genetic diseases that show up later. Not saying to never breed young but breeder and pup buyers need to be aware that some issues won't necessarily crop up till later, and no one is immune from those problems. J.
  4. Roxanne, I suspect that Chick-N-Picker is not native to the US. Some of his/her wording is very reminiscent of that of a Danish friend of mine. A "showroom", then, is the show ring. J.
  5. Regarding the animals in the lobby at a vet practice: every place I've ever worked had asked people with coughing dogs to keep them in the car and the vet goes to them. Likewise with dogs that might be exhibiting symptoms of parvo or similar. Of course not all people are honest (or know enough to recognize symptoms and relay that info to the vet) about what's going on with their pet, so taking your pet to the vet can risk exposure. That said, if you're concerned about such things, you could leave your pet in the car until it's called in to be seen. To turn the example about going to the doctor's office around, I don't get myself vaccinated yearly or on some other schedule for fear of what I might be exposed to if I have to go to the doctor; I take reasonable precautions to prevent exposure if I must go. I do the same with my pets. Too many vets, in my opinion, use the "fear factor" to talk people into giving vaccines more often than is likely necessary. That is, they tell the horror stories to make owners feel they're bad owners if they don't vaccinate according to the vet's protocol instead of having an actual discussion with the owners discussing the pros and cons for each individual's needs and situation. Of course the former approach gets the job done more quickly, but I don't think it's always in the best interests of the pet and owner. Just my opinion. J.
  6. Regarding the animals in the lobby at a vet practice: every place I've ever worked had asked people with coughing dogs to keep them in the car and the vet goes to them. Likewise with dogs that might be exhibiting symptoms of parvo or similar. Of course not all people are honest (or know enough to recognize symptoms and relay that info to the vet) about what's going on with their pet, so taking your pet to the vet can risk exposure. That said, if you're concerned about such things, you could leave your pet in the car until it's called in to be seen. To turn the example about going to the doctor's office around, I don't get myself vaccinated yearly or on some other schedule for fear of what I might be exposed to if I have to go to the doctor; I take reasonable precautions to prevent exposure if I must go. I do the same with my pets. Too many vets, in my opinion, use the "fear factor" to talk people into giving vaccines more often than is likely necessary. That is, they tell the horror stories to make owners feel they're bad owners if they don't vaccinate according to the vet's protocol instead of having an actual discussion with the owners discussing the pros and cons for each individual's needs and situation. Of course the former approach gets the job done more quickly, but I don't think it's always in the best interests of the pet and owner. Just my opinion. J.
  7. At least the vet said vaccinate and wait. In the past I've had them take the dog in for surgery and vaccinate without asking, as if a vaccination the day of is going to actually afford any immunity. That said, I can't speak to the veracity of Liz's experience, but I have never vaccinated my dogs for bordatella and they've been infected just once in the nearly 20 years I've had dogs, and that was thanks to someone bringing an infected dog to a sheepdog trial. I don't use groomers or boarding kennels, but there is a kennel on this property and there certainly isn't any issue with bordatella, parvo, or distemper here. I would have a serious talk with my vet, and if it couldn't be resolved to my satisfaction, I'd start looking for another vet. If your vet knows you, then s/he also knows that you take care of your dogs and the risk of them being ill and infecting another client's pet is probably slim to none. I am capable of making considered and informed decisions about the vaccines (and other care) my pets get and blanket mandates aren't going to make me a happy client. J.
  8. I've never measured mine, but I have some pretty small purebred border collies. I agree with Sue: If she appeals to you, get her. J.
  9. There's nothing I see in the photo of your pup that would say to me he's not a border collie. Not all border collies crouch. One of my main work dogs has eye but very little style. My other main work dog exhibits a lot of style. A plain working dog will never show the "border collie crouch." You've gotten plenty of good advice. If you have worms/worm eggs in your environment, then your pup can easily re-infect itself. If you're using OTC flea preventives, you may be using something that just isn't working that great (the only things that have been working for me are Seresto collars and Nexguard for different dogs; Frontline and like products quite working years ago for me). Droncit/Drontal will kill the tapes in the pup but will have zero residual effect if the pup continues to ingest fleas or other sources of tapes. As for your breeder misrepresenting anything, it doesn't sound as if that was the case. You don't say if you were looking for a working dog, but next time around you'll know what registries NOT to consider. Just remember that ABCA registered no more guarantees a working dog than any other registry. If you want a working dog look for a breeder whose dogs are actually working (and that doesn't mean just occasionally seeing stock out in the field). If you were just looking for a pet, then I don't guess it matters so much about the registry other than what the registry might imply about the breeder (in this case, likely a BYB or similar). Roxanne, I use ivomec as an HW preventive. I assume (especially at the low doses given) that it gets nothing but heartworms. I use 10% fenbendazole cattle dewormer roughly quarterly to cover intestinal parasites, mainly because the dogs will eat poop (sheep, goat, rabbit, etc.). Maybe that's overkill, but I've never expected the ivomec to get anything else.... J.
  10. Sorry for my slow response; I don't get here as often as I used to. Willow was older when diagnosed with mitral valve problems and I think she was already retired at that time. That said, we still took long walks, and she raced around with the rest of the pack without any problems. J.
  11. I used both enalapril and Vetmedin for Willow. Given the expense of the Vetmedin, I'd opt for the enalapril first, but then age of the dog and other financial factors figure in to that. I don't remember at what age Willow was found to have a significant murmur, but she lived to be just a few weeks shy of 16, even though she was not on Vetmedin the entire time she was being treated for the murmur/heart enlargement. J.
  12. I guess my experience is different. Until I moved where I live now my dogs *always* shared space with my free range chickens. They were taught from puppyhood that chickens (or chicks) are not to be chased or bothered in any way. Teaching them to leave the chickens alone (unless directed to do something with them) never affected their willingness or ability to work the chickens if I asked them to do so (and they were willing to work poultry). It certainly *is* all about management, but I disagree that a dog can never be left alone with the poultry. My multiple working border collies (from 4-5 weeks old on up) always coexisted with my poultry without anything getting killed. Just my two cents. J.
  13. I remember seeing old trial programs (early days of trialing in the UK) where an entrant was simply listed as "bearded" as in not rough or smooth, specifically, but bearded. It was used as a descriptive term for a particular dog in that program similar to how different dogs are described in Barbara Carpenter's books, just as descriptions of the individual dogs. Remember that Lassie collies were once part of the larger sheepdog/border collie gene pool. I don't find it a large leap of faith to believe that someone took bearded border collies and continued to breed them for a distinctive look until they had what is now referred to as a beardie in KC circles. No different than the development of the Lassie collie. If you go to the gallery and search on beardie, you should find at least one or two threads with pictures of working beardies in the US. Most are Polly's/Suzanne Craddock's dogs, but they don't all look exactly alike, even when all related. Sirius is the offspring of Polly's Lily and James. Lily was a smooth coat and James was part beardie. Only a couple of the pups in the litter, including Sirius, were bearded. Rachel, some years ago at the Fall Fiber Festival and Montpelier SDT, someone showed up with a show type beardie and asked to run their dog. The run was much as you described except that this dog never even made it out to the sheep. It was all rather strange. J.
  14. I just add a couple of capfuls of bleach in. J.
  15. I also use bleach, but I just add a capful or two. It seems to work quite well. J.
  16. A round pen, a smallish field for transitioning from the round pen, and the rest wide open. A shelter of some sort, and either a chute, stall, or small pen (or combination thereof) for ease of catching/treating sheep (and of course a dog can learn a lot pushing sheep through a chute or holding them in the corner of a small pen while you do what you need to do with the sheep). I'd leave as much wide open as I could to be able to practice large gathers, blind gathers and the like. I'd probably use portable fencing (electronet) if I wanted to mob or rotational graze just so I could leave the open spaces.... J.
  17. I can't add any more, really, so I'll just say ditto to what everyone else has said. Get the hell away from that trainer. I'd probably go one step further and tell the trainer exactly WHY I'm dumping him/her, not that it will necessarily change their training philosophy, but you never know.... J.
  18. Is the heartbeat suppression dose dependent? That is, is the risk in overdosing? J.
  19. I like Facebook because it's an easy way to keep up with the activities of family and friends, and to reconnect with old friends. How much you allow it to intrude on your life is entirely up to you. J.
  20. My neighbor used it (Sileo) with her very fit agility border collie who is so thunderphobic as to practicality try to kill herself to escape the noise. She had used Sileo all weekend for the fireworks and we gave her dog a dose last night before the big storm (owner traveling) we had and she's a different dog. She is giving slightly less than the recommended amount for her dog's size. I intend to try it on my youngster who is thunderphobic, I've been that impressed with her results. J.
  21. My neighbor is trying the Sileo with her one dog that is extremely thunderphobic. Today is her first try and her dog is barely reacting at all, basically came downstairs briefly when she heard thunder, then went back upstairs and got on the bed. Granted, the storms are skirting us, but if it works as well as it seems to be so far for her it'll be a life changer for her dog. J.
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