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juliepoudrier

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About juliepoudrier

  • Rank
    Poseur extraordinaire and Borg Queen!
  • Birthday December 22

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  • Website URL
    https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Poudrier-and-Crowder-Set-Out-Specialists/329618357089895
  • ICQ
    23851736

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Virginia
  1. juliepoudrier

    Collie Breeding

    Smh. Someone likes to hear him/herself pontificate and tell the rest of the world how misguided, rude, and idiotic we are. I have you an answer: Pawprint does genetic color testing. I imagine they could also give you the information you seek regarding possible coat and eye colors that might result from a particular cross. None of us here is a color genetics expert and it's unlikely any one of the inbreds here could answer your question in any meaningful way. Why not get the genetic testing done on the bitch and two potential sires and let the genetics experts tell you what they think the possibilities are? I mean, I know it's more entertaining to lecture the people here, but you've been given a simple answer to your question, one that has the best chance of giving you the best possible information you can get. Why not take that and run with it? J.
  2. juliepoudrier

    Collie Breeding

    I guess after rudely telling everyone how rude and elitist they are the OP has run off to revel in his victory. I wonder if that lovely missive was composed in advance? Seems like another troll has come and gone. At any rate, how would anyone be able to predict colors without knowing the colors of the sires? And don't the genetics companies offer genetic color tests? Couldn't someone do those tests and then decide what colors would likely be produced? If they really wanted to spend $$ doing that?
  3. juliepoudrier

    One Honest Politician

    doG knows I don't think I can take 8 years of blatant lies.
  4. juliepoudrier

    chicken compost on sheep pasture??

    I second asking your extension agent. I would guess that the amount of copper in the grass would depend on whether it's taken up by the plants or runs off or is somehow sequestered by other chemicals in the soil. J.
  5. juliepoudrier

    Recently started herding lessons

    I just think about it in terms of the dog's left (come bye) and right (away). It doesn't matter which way the dog is facing--it's either going to go to its left or right.... J.
  6. juliepoudrier

    Grain free

    Oh yes, and those who chose not to feed raw just don't have the fortitude to be bothered. We're a lazy bunch, lol. J.
  7. juliepoudrier

    Breeder didn’t register litter

    Wow, you're blaming ABCA for your poor choice in a breeder? Registries don't "guarantee" quality. Your own research does that. Everything you described about that breeder should have been a huge, waving red flag to you. And yet you bought a pup anyway. That's on you. The ABCA secretary is one person. She can't police the gazillion breeders out there. J.
  8. juliepoudrier

    Flea and Tick Medication

    You should ask your trainer for some actual data from a reliable source to back up his/her claims. And keep doing what you're doing. If it works for you there's no need to change it. J.
  9. I have a friend who used it on her extremely thunderphobic border collie with good results. J.
  10. As someone who owned and managed a fear aggressive dog, I can say that at least in my case, escalating or trying to punish never did anything to diminish his fear biting. Recognizing what triggered him and managing *that* is where I had the greatest success. The first time he snapped at me, my immediate reaction was to swat him across the muzzle. He taught me pretty quickly that reacting to him with any sort of aggression or violence (no matter the mild) was a recipe for increased fear aggression from him. In those 14 years he only seriously bit me once (my mistake) and never hurt anyone else. J.
  11. juliepoudrier

    Sudden Death Pining

    I'm so sorry for your loss. Cherish your memories; they will help you through this. Mags is waiting for you on the other side. J.
  12. juliepoudrier

    Selection against HD - best practice

    Maja, I think the reason the work didn't necessarily show the condition of the hips is because working dogs are generally fit and well-muscled, and that muscling provides support to bad hips so they may go unnoticed (without radiographs) when the dog is of breeding age. My Jill had terrible hips, discovered on radiographs when her original owner wanted to breed her. She never had any problems from her hips until she was quite aged, no longer working, and of course less muscled. Now that it's possible to view a dog's hips, dogs with bad hips shouldn't be inadvertently bred, but the nature of the beast is such that there can be no guarantees. I honestly think in the case of a dog with relatives with HD that the overall incidence in that family, how good a worker the dog is, and the overall hip "history" of the potential mate would all need to be taken into account. J.
  13. juliepoudrier

    Old dogs

    I think genetics plays a role, helped along by good diets and good weights, as well as active lifestyles. All things that are supposed to confer longevity in humans too.... J.
  14. Quality of life is my criterion too. I have never actually been told that I *should* put an old dog down. My vets have always trusted me to do the right thing at the right time. But having worked for vets and having numerous friends who work for vets, I can say that it happens way too often that owners refuse to put a pet down, despite all medical indications to the contrary, because they can't face doing so. The extremes are the people who insist that a dog be brought out of anesthesia during a surgery that finds something like inoperable cancer so they can say goodbye. So if I encountered a vet who suggested my dog was coming up on that time and I didn't agree, I'd either just nod my head and continue to do my own thing or simply tell my vet that I disagreed and that I'm fully prepared to do the deed when I believe my dog's quality of life has decreased to the point where such a decision is necessary. No need to feel guilted by a vet, and when something like that happens, just try to remember that vets likely see far more owners who hang on too long than the opposite. J.
  15. juliepoudrier

    Passing of a long time member Mum24Dog

    I don't get here much anymore, but an really sorry to hear this. One more "old timer" gone from this forum. Godspeed Pam. J.
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