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alligande

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About alligande

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  1. Take a look at Dave Munnings Q-me agility classes. He is one of the UKs top handlers (might be the best) his online classes are very affordable and don't require a lot of equipment or space, you can do masses with one jump. (as an aside I used to take my stuff to a local park before I lived 10 minutes from my club) I would recommend adding his facebook support as it well help you learn. I am a committed and dedicated agility competitor, my youngster is agility partner #3, the most important thing to remember is that it is a team sport it goes way beyond dog training, there is loads for you to learn, I have been competing over 10 years and I am still learning all the time. The fundamentals are important for both of you to be successful and learning those fundamentals doesn't have to be boring. You say he knows hand signals for turns etc but applying them in the fast moving environment of an agility course is very different. When we teach foundations we want to make sure that the both team members have the fundamentals down so that neither gets frustrated and have long term problems as they advance. The other aspect is safety, the contact equipment can be unsafe if not taught correctly, the same applies to jumping you can hurt a dog if you are not careful. As a sport agility has changed a lot in the last 10 years, its got faster and more complicated which is why good teachers put more emphasis on the basics, but fundamentally its still loads of fun for both team members.
  2. My dogs are raw fed, the older one has excellent clean teeth even if they are 1/3 size they should be from a habit of carrying logs around. The younger one has one area that is dodgy and shows plaque, it’s better since I switched to raw but certainly not pearly white. As already mentioned genetics play a role, a previous border collie also had teeth that needed periodic cleaning, whilst my other dog at the time only needed dentistry when she cracked a tooth at 12. Other than a decent diet and raw meaty bones I don’t do anything special, between all the things I do with my dogs I don’t have the discipline to start brushing.
  3. My boys are recreational sheep dogs. Its an hour drive for them to go, when I started out we went once a week approx to get them started, and now about once a month. My oldest dog is 10 now and he only started a year a go, has natural talent and loves to work. My youngster is a well bred working dog, but doesn't have the same instinct as my older rescue dog, but I persist as I feel it helps his focus and confidence. Their full time job is agility, I have seen no negatives introducing them to sheep, if anything I would say they have more self control as that is what they are really learning in a field full of sheep.
  4. We have boys, my husband and I prefer boy dogs, so that is what we have. Its just a weird personal preference based on all the foster border collies we have had the only ones we have wanted to keep have been the boys. I currently have two intact males, the youngest came as a puppy and there has never been any problems between them.
  5. So sorry Sue, over the years I thoroughly enjoyed reading about Celt, learned an amazing amount with your detailed story of his rehab and everything else. Thank you you for sharing him with us.
  6. It’s a very traditional way to train a release among competitive obedience trainers, it has always made me uncomfortable, I am a “force free” trainer especially when dogs are learning new things I just can’t imagine any animal including humans being able to learn well with the threat of pain. Now if you walk across my coffee table because it’s the shortest route I am not permissive you will be hearing a suitable correction, but it won’t be physical.
  7. Both my boys are intact at 10 and 3 1/2 and living in Spain they regularly encounter bitches in season, the older one has absolutely no interest in girls, the younger one loves girls but there has never been a time I have been concerned about an accidental matting. The OP doesn’t say what country she lives in so her vets advice might be the norm, even in the US my vet advised me to keep the oldest one entire for as long as possible and not bother if he wasn’t an annoying boy. She was a breeder of standard poodles and told me she had clearly seen the difference in her puppies between those who were neutered late and those at the standard 6months. But as she admitted this was not advice she gave everyone.
  8. USDAA have a version of Rally. https://www.rallydogs.com
  9. Sorry I have to agree with Gentle Lake there is no CBD oil in there. As you commented that you haven't seen any change in behavior maybe try a real CBD oil. From everything I have read about CBD it is suggested to use the oil directly and not buy the treats as you have no idea what you are getting.
  10. This is excellent advice, keep it fun, don’t let him be a jerk and and eventually a nice dog will return.
  11. I bought my first non-rescue puppy from a small scale breeder in Scotland. To me the only reason to breed is working ability, this litter was bred as each of them were ready for a new dog. I am glad that you are looking for an ISDS dog, my youngster comes from a working mum and a dual purpose dad, open trial and grade 7 agility. I wouldn't worry about a pup being reared outside if it is being handled and exposed to life, what could be more scary than large farm equipment! My youngster was raised in the house with a couple of kids but he never went any further than the kitchen and the garden, so I am not sure how different that would be to being in a barn on an active farm. He has grown into a confident young man, from 10 weeks on he was taken on lots of adventures and exposed to a huge variety of things. What I looked for: Reason for breeding, Health testing, quality of the parents. As I am not in the UK I went onto a number of UK based sheepdog groups and did some networking and that's how I found my pup, the litter was never advertised and the breeder doesn't have a website as they only breed very occasionally The breeder and I spent a lot of time on the phone getting to know each other, she wanted to be sure I could handle a driven ISDS dog, I wanted to know about their dogs. There was nothing hidden, when we went and got him we met the parents, had dinner with the family. One of her concerns was not being able to take him back, as like any good breeder they want the dogs back if doesn't work out so they can rehome them well. I am not a fan of sports bred dogs, I have friends with them and I find they are missing the chill gene! My supposedly high drive ISDS dog is the best pet I could have asked for, but get a toy out and go play agility he comes to life, he is very thoughtful around sheep as well.
  12. I started in NADAC, its not really a tandem turn, as its taught as a change of lead, I think what makes it so unique is that it is primarily used on the flat as a change of direction, I have watched NADAC masters use it well and always loved it. There were many things I hated about NADAC but I always loved the switch command.
  13. In my world of agility they don't have a lot of use, but on the wide open NADAC courses they work really well. It is something I would like in my tool box but my youngster has so many other critical skills to master that I don't think its going to happen, an independent backside is much more critical for us.
  14. You are really starting to get some nice distance, the one handling move from NADAC that I have always liked is the switch (change lead) and you have it down.
  15. I think because of your agility experience you will stand a good chance. When I was involved in border collie rescue in the US we always struggled to find adopters who wanted to be active with their dogs. I would start networking with potential rescues, so they start to get to know you and understand that you would be a good home for a border collie I spent 4 months living in an apartment on the 6th floor with no elavator, with my border collie he adapted really well, we are all glad when we moved out though those stairs were brutal!
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