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gcv-border

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Everything posted by gcv-border

  1. OOPs! Forgot to clarify that an iliopsoas strain is similar to a groin pull in humans. Therefore it can affect movement that involves extension of the abdominal area i.e. jumping extensions. When your dog doesn't want to fully extend their rear legs due to the pain of the iliopsoas strain, dropped bars can be the result. Jovi __________________________________________________ I think all the suggestions have merit. It is a very complex issue. So far, 1. Teach the dog to jump via jump exercises (Susan Salo DVD, ladders, cavalettis, wrap-work, positive reinforcement for NOT ticking/dropping bars, etc, etc.) I understand that almost all dogs need to be taught to jump correctly. 2. Is it something you are doing that causes the dog to adjust in mid-air leading to a dropped bar? That was a good comment, and probably happens more than one realizes, particularly for a beginning handler. I am a beginning handler and it is very common for my instructor to point out that the reason my dog dropped a bar was because I was late, or not clear, or too close, or whatever with my handling cue. Then, when I repeat the sequence, if I get the timing right, usually my dog does it beautifully. I would like to add a third category to the list - injury. Injury (specifically iliopsoas strain) can cause dropped bars. Personally, I think the first 2 reasons are more likely, but it might be worth checking out an iliopsoas strain, or at least keep it in the back of your mind. I went through this with my dog (~ 15-16 months old at the time) and learned a lot. A couple of things to point out: (1) a dog with a high pain tolerance may not show any other sign of an iliopsoas strain beyond dropped bars. If you can find a rehab vet, he/she would be the best person to check out your dog. I wouldn't necessarily trust a general vet. (My general vet did not diagnose it.) (2) One of the rehab vets I worked with believes that there are many more iliopsoas strains in agility dogs than are diagnosed. She cringes when she hears someone saying that their dog is 'lazy' because it keeps dropping bars. To her, that is a sign to check the dog for an iliopsoas strain. Good Luck, Jovi
  2. I think all the suggestions have merit. It is a very complex issue. So far, 1. Teach the dog to jump via jump exercises (Susan Salo DVD, ladders, cavalettis, wrap-work, positive reinforcement for NOT ticking/dropping bars, etc, etc.) I understand that almost all dogs need to be taught to jump correctly. 2. Is it something you are doing that causes the dog to adjust in mid-air leading to a dropped bar? That was a good comment, and probably happens more than one realizes, particularly for a beginning handler. I am a beginning handler and it is very common for my instructor to point out that the reason my dog dropped a bar was because I was late, or not clear, or too close, or whatever with my handling cue. Then, when I repeat the sequence, if I get the timing right, usually my dog does it beautifully. I would like to add a third category to the list - injury. Injury (specifically iliopsoas strain) can cause dropped bars. Personally, I think the first 2 reasons are more likely, but it might be worth checking out an iliopsoas strain, or at least keep it in the back of your mind. I went through this with my dog (~ 15-16 months old at the time) and learned a lot. A couple of things to point out: (1) a dog with a high pain tolerance may not show any other sign of an iliopsoas strain beyond dropped bars. If you can find a rehab vet, he/she would be the best person to check out your dog. I wouldn't necessarily trust a general vet. (My general vet did not diagnose it.) (2) One of the rehab vets I worked with believes that there are many more iliopsoas strains in agility dogs than are diagnosed. She cringes when she hears someone saying that their dog is 'lazy' because it keeps dropping bars. To her, that is a sign to check the dog for an iliopsoas strain. Good Luck, Jovi
  3. A comment on another email forum started me thinking about the negative perceptions and biases that non-BC people have about BCs --- so I was wondering if anyone else has experienced comments, unintended or purposeful, regarding our favorite dog breed? I would be very interested in your anecdotes. Here are 2 of mine: First: I brought my BC puppy (he was about 14-16 weeks old at the time) to a local "puppy class" for socialization and some rudimentary obedience. He did very well with any and all of the commands. After a few weeks, one of the other participants made a comment about how having a BC was "cheating". Really now!! Second: Out of curiosity, I brought my dog to a local flyball club to see if it was something I would like to do with him. (I knew he would like it, but I wasn't so sure that I would.) Interestingly, this flyball club did not have a single BC on the team. During the introductions, one person commented that "BCs are OK, but I wouldn't want to live with one". Later, I did take satisfaction that my hard-to-live-with BC was one of the best-behaved dogs at their practice. While these comments are not mean, they did surprise me. I had no response to either comment, but that was probably for the best. So - has anyone else experienced comments or actions indicating a negative perception about (or maybe jealousy of) the BC? Jovi
  4. Carla's response was excellent - and the additional advice as also helpful. One thing I might add is to reward his quiet times. Yes, you can teach him "off" by positive motivation, but I also try to CAPTURE behaviors that he does voluntarily (i.e. staying quietly on the rug for example or any other behavior that he does that you like but have not actively asked for). I reward with a low & soft "good boy", a treat and/or a pat (a pat when he is older). I do not use my happy voice for instances like this since that tends to energize. In the beginning, he may get energized when you treat for being quiet, but he should learn to just stay there and accept his treat - eventually. Good Luck and be prepared to be a walking/talking treat dispenser for a while. Jovi
  5. I currently use Frontline Plus AND a preventic collar --- and Iverhart Max. I had been using Advantix since their marketing led me to believe that it provided more complete coverage, but we (2 dogs and 2 humans) kept getting ticks. There is nothing I hate more than seeing a bloated tick that has fallen off one of the dogs. Based on the advice of my rehab vet, who works with a search & rescue team that is always in the woods, I have been using my current regimen for about a year and see very few ticks (on the dogs). She says that you can use Frontline Plus with the preventic collar, but NOT to combine the preventic collar with Advantix since Advantix is a much more toxic chemical. A friend's vet does not think combining the two are a good idea, but it is the only thing that has worked for me here in SW VA. (I do not have kids, but do have cats - which should not be exposed to the preventic collar. No problems so far.) I just heard of someone who religiously uses Frontline Plus and just had her dog diagnosed with both Lyme and erlichia. I don't know what it is, but I keep hearing about how one product works welll in one region, but not another. Or how one owner is happy with a product, but the same product doesn't seem to work for the neighbor down the road. I wouldn't discount different body chemistry between dogs and regional differences in tick populations. Jovi It's been a tick a day on one dog or the other or the cat and once or twice on DH since fair weather broke and we've started walking in the far fields and as DH lets them all over the furniture and up on the bed, they are all on their way out the door - the cat and DH included - until I get this under control. We use Revolution and until this year have not had a problem.....does anyone have any suggestions for another spot-on heartworm/flea/tick/worm preventative that does not contain Ivermection (yeah, I know - but better safe than very sorry) Thanks, Liz
  6. Here's the link. Here's the relevant information (bolded for your convenience): The above is from Gil. Ash's excellent site on tick diseases. J. Julie, Thank you for that EXCELLENT link. I agree that probiotics can help - just from my own personal experience. (Both of my dogs have been on either doxy or amoxi without much decrease in appetite. The main side effect has been loose stools - for which I used probiotics.) Two interesting points I noticed: It was recommended to give probiotics 2 hours AFTER the doxy tablet. When I was on doxy for Lyme disease, my doctor told me to take a probiotic tablet (available at health food stores) at least 1 hour BEFORE take the doxy tablet. Over a period of 30 days, I forgot to take the probiotic tablet twice and boy, did my stomach pay for it. Anyway, whatever works is best. (My experience with Lyme disease was about 10 years ago, so I am sure that today more is known about how to treat the side effects of doxy, etc.) Also, I willl have to talk to my vet with regard to the amoxi treatment for erlichiosis. One of my dogs just finished a 28 day treatment of amoxi twice per day for erlichiosis. I remember him prescribing amoxi because he felt it worked better than doxy for erlichiosis, but now I am doubting my memory. I will need to revisit that with him. Jovi
  7. OH Boy. This really describes me and my dog. (Novices, both of us.) I like the term 'spectating'. I recently had a private lesson with an out-of-town agility instructor (who was in town for a workshop), and she also noted how I just stood there watching him run towards me after I led out. I thought he looked sooo pretty - just like those cool dogs on TV that are agility champions. So now I have been working on keeping my feet moving, but then the next problem pops up --- there are times I need to decelerate, and even stop, to indicate to my dog the path I want him to follow. Just too much for my brain (accelerate, decelerate, stop) - but if I do it right, Torque responds perfectly. Regarding start-line stays: Torque also will stand from a sit or creep forward at a start line stay when at a trial. (He is much better at lessons.) I find that if I keep eye contact and hold my hand up to make him stay when I lead out, he doesn't push as much. Yes, I would love to be one of those handlers that set their dogs and then blithely walk away, but at this stage, he is too excited. I am working on it and hope he will improve as he matures, but since he can be controlled if I pay attention, I am satisfied with that at the moment. Jovi One of my instructors accuses me of "spectating" Yes, I guess I'm guilty of that because I just can't believe how fast and cool he looks when he runs but that's probably only part of the problem. I think I'm stunned and shocked sometimes and I just stand there not knowing what to do. It's taken a long time to get used to his speed and his quick response to every single move and command I give. I really thought agility was a piece of cake because I ran an aussie that wasn't as fast and she covered every wrong move I made. She was my first agility dog. Chase leaves me no room for any errors. Bless him, he tries so hard for me. We are slowly getting it together and working as a team. He's understanding me better and I'm understanding him better. It's going to be one heck of a ride with him! It has been so far!
  8. Coconut :-) I know I sound like a broken record LOL but I'm telling you coconut will/should fix your dog right up. If you look in an earlier post of mine, in a medical study Coconut(actually the Lauric acid in coconut) was found to be more effective in the treatement of giardia than both Metro. and Fenbend. (panacur) I've used it with great success on both my dogs and horses...It's cheap, it's natural, can in no way harm them...try it :-) Betty Betty, I would love to learn more information about coconut/lauric acid for treatment of giardia. Can you please point me to your previous post (can someone else)? I often use the normal pharmaceuticals required for various symptoms, but if possible, I substitute alternative treatments that I consider more "natural" -- so my ears always perk up when I hear or see a new treatment. Here is my treatment for diarrhea: Note: this is for diarrhea where the animal is otherwise normal. i.e. the animal is bright-eyed, normal temp and activity. I would try something different/stronger if the diarrhea was concurrent with poor attitude, high temp or other signs indicative of a more serious problem. Use BioSponge from Platinum Performance. (Google it to get the website) I like it because it is not what I consider a "drug". It is described as an adsorbant clay that non-specifically adsorbs, thus removing, toxins, etc. in the intestine. I believe that they also claim it helps remove Clostridial sp. (Don't quote me on that. It has been a while since I re-read the website.) It reminds me of the activated charcoal that my large animal vet gives me for upset tummy/diarrhea symptoms in my alpacas. I have used it with great success in alpacas and my dogs. I also know several fellow livestock owners that swear by it. I would also consider taking it myself if necessary. N.B. I have no financial interest in Platinum Performance, nor do I know anyone connected to the company. I just think that BioSponge is a great product. Jovi
  9. First, to help understand the symptoms described, I think that it is essential to have an objective study done to accurately describe the symptoms and then to determine if there is a physiologic or mental or genetic basis. I am very glad that research funds will be applied toward this end. Based on several anecdotes such as the one referenced below, maybe we should call it BCCCS (Border Collie Concentration Collapse Syndrome) Just a joke :>) Cheers, Jovi Liz, We also had a dog that had these episodes even in cool weather. The episodes appear to me to be linked to high mental excitement in conjunction with anaerobic activity. The dogs breathing can appear normal during the activity but when the activity is ceased their physical state deteriorates: increased breathing, more forceful breathing, loss of balance, loss of control of their back legs, clenched jaw, etc. These symptoms arise 1-5 mins after physical exertion is ceased; often while walking off the field or after having left the field. It's as if their mind does not realize that their body is in anaerobic distress until the object of their focus has been removed and as if they were not breathing enough during the physical activity. Mark
  10. I agree that leash pulling should first be addressed as a training issue (wouldn't it be great to have a dog that doesn't pull, pays attention, heels regardless of distractions, etc.) Needless to say, my dog is not like that - although he is getting better. Having said that, leashes are part of my dog's 'wardrobe' so it is nice to be able to have different functions (slip, clip, martingales, tracking, etc.) and different colors and materials. AKC agility competitions require entering and leaving the ring on a leash so you need some kind of leash. I think it is just a matter of what you like and what works well for your dog. I usually use a slip lead. When looking for leads, I have found that every so often I find a leash vendor at an agility trial - and it is special when I find one that makes custom leads. I just bought a braided 5-foot slip lead in the colors of my choice at an agility trial a month ago. A friend just found another vendor making cool custom leads at an agility trial in MD. So don't forget to check out the vendors at the agility trials!! Jovi I just use a cotton clothes line cut to 6 ft and a double ended hook, so much for the fashion statement we make! If i use anything heavier it slows dew's brain down from what we're working on, cause she's concerned with a dragging heavy lead or pulling which is not allowed. I would think leash pulling is a training thing that needs to be addressed for agility training anyways. It was one of the first things we worked on for our first agility lesson. Dew and I don't need work of that but everyone else did. I train the leash pulling thing when they are puppies. A combo of a light jerk correction on the lead and the not moving till the leash is slack has worked for us, untill sheep then it's off lead training which transfers to on lead too. And I'm sure Dew's drive is = to any dog around. It's what we determine to be acceptable or unacceptable behavior right from the start. Drive doesn't mean you can excuse pulling it just means you might have to work harder to get the pulling undercontrol but I swear it can be done!
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