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Kenbo

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Everything posted by Kenbo

  1. Food for thought... "Border Collies are extremely intelligent and active dogs. Intelligence and hyperactivity are not characteristics that most people are capable of handling. Border Collies need constant attention and if they are not true working dogs, they need to be given "chores" and "tasks" around the home to serve as outlets for their boundless energy. If no outlet is given, they will find one on their own (generally one not desirable). Being smart allows them to learn quickly, not only how to behave but also how to get into trouble. It is not easy to "fool" a Border Collie into doing or not doing something. You must always be one step ahead of them and sometimes it isn't so easy. The hyperactivity is also something you must think long and hard about. Some individuals are certainly calmer and less active than others but the breed as a whole, because of their breeding goals, is highly active. If you live in a small apartment or have no place to run the dog in wide open spaces, I think another breed of dog would be better suited for your circumstances. If you want a dog that lies around the house most of the time, is rarely noticed, and is generally unobtrusive, then a Border Collie is not for you. They demand (literally demand) lots of attention and lots of activity. If you do not have the time or energy to devote to the dog, then there are better choices."
  2. At times, the color takes time, 12 months or so for it to fill. They will nearly always change as they get older. At two years or so, you will know for sure.
  3. I have worked with Border Collies and rescue for many years and when I would talk with a prospective owner, I always gave them this info which I found. I have nine BC's and nearly every word is true. I don't think it would be a good time right now. In the last two months my foundation had taken custody of 7 BC's and have two in our possession right now and every owner felt they could handle them when they got them. "Border Collies are extremely intelligent and active dogs. Intelligence and hyperactivity are not characteristics that most people are capable of handling. Border Collies need constant attention and if they are not true working dogs, they need to be given "chores" and "tasks" around the home to serve as outlets for their boundless energy. If no outlet is given, they will find one on their own (generally one not desirable). Being smart allows them to learn quickly, not only how to behave but also how to get into trouble. It is not easy to "fool" a Border Collie into doing or not doing something. You must always be one step ahead of them and sometimes it isn't so easy. The hyperactivity is also something you must think long and hard about. Some individuals are certainly calmer and less active than others but the breed as a whole, because of their breeding goals, is highly active. If you live in a small apartment or have no place to run the dog in wide open spaces, I think another breed of dog would be better suited for your circumstances. If you want a dog that lies around the house most of the time, is rarely noticed, and is generally unobtrusive, then a Border Collie is not for you. They demand (literally demand) lots of attention and lots of activity. If you do not have the time or energy to devote to the dog, then there are better choices."
  4. On July 30, 2016, Clancy suddenly crossed over the rainbow bridge. He died as he lived, playing Frisbee with his “friends” at the farm. The Goal of “Clancy’s Dream” is to provide a safe spot for unwanted Border Collies that need to be rehabilitated or re-homed. For the past four years, we have taken numerous dogs in and have a 100% success rate on finding good homes for them all and have rehomed 4 this month. Usually, they are high risk or have social problems, but over time, they always come around to see that humans are good. When re-homed, there was never a cost to the new owner for the pet, just a promise that they will fulfill our wants for a good and safe environment to their new dog. Because of the sudden death of our beloved Clancy and never wanting his legacy to die, we have established Clancy's Dream to keep his spirit alive. To help continue the work we do, including funding to Veterinarians or clinics to assist families who can’t afford medical help for their sick or injured dog and to assist and rescue dogs finding them a home, rather than euthanize them. www.clancysdream.org
  5. Randy Sanders, a Tippecanoe County man accused of animal neglect has been found guilty of all charges during his trial in a Tippecanoe County courtroom Today. It's finally over. http://wlfi.com/2016/04/12/trial-underway-for-former-tippecanoe-co-dog-breeder/
  6. He is telling you that he considers himself as the leader in your household. Dog food aggression sometimes called is a dominance issue, it is serious and needs to be addressed immediately. It won't simply just go away. Food or toy aggression in dogs should never be tolerated as you never know when it can escalate into something more dangerous for you or a family member. I’ve worked with rescue groups that would not even take in a food aggressive dog because of the underlying problems. Find someone who is an expert on this, not just someone who thinks they know the answer. This can be a very dangerous situation and I would keep your son away and not force him into the picture with the dog.
  7. Had the same thing on my Clancy (BC) He is outside a lot on our 10 acres. I notices a knot under his chin and the next day it was bigger. It very quickly got to the side of a baseball and the next day, we went to the Vet. No idea what it was and they drained it. It was filled with blood and puss. Gave him antibiotics. It went away for a month. It came back with vigor and in just a day it burst and drained on it's own. Back to the Vet and they opened it and flushed the pocket out, put a drain in and antibiotics again. It never came back and I would assume he had something in it. Hopefully they checked the inside of his mouth where he could have jammed something inside of Jester's mouth.
  8. With a very very heart, the problem was found... It is Lymphoma...
  9. Having rehabilitated and worked with BC's, the biggest issues I have seen is wrong placement for them but I have also seen a BC that lived in an apartment that has work great. It's the commitment someone has that makes it work. Not knowing much about your lifestyle, it could be a challenge but it will be the best decision or the worst. A rescue we placed several months ago was a 2 year old blind BC. Sylvester was great and was placed with a family that took him everywhere, even camping. It is a great fit. There is a Blind Dog Rescue located in Seymour, CT. It's worth a look... www.blinddogrescue.org/
  10. I agree with "rufftie", I have 9 BC's and one GSD. They are outside most of all day and there are pecking orders with each sex. We have 7 females and 3 males. The biggest challenge is the males but you can have issues with the females. It is manageable to have a third but it will change the the pack. I would strongly suggest a male. Once house breaking, your problems should be a minimal because a different sex is not a threat. I had an old farmer once tell me "A female dog loves you, a mail dog is in love with you" and it's true... Remember, two dogs depend on each other, with 3, someone will be a third wheel. Male dog will work best...
  11. After two days, she had not lad a problem at all. so far, so good... Abby is a very active dog and most of my dogs run free on our fenced 10 acres. They do stay near me but usually go to the bathroom in the woods. What signs you you look for with an upcoming infection?
  12. We started the Proin (50) last night. How long before you see results?
  13. Thanks for the info, I am a worrier and hate it when the dogs feel bad or are hurt. I have 9 BC's and one GSD. The medication looks like it will do the job. I had a friend tell me about VetriScience Bladder Control. I will do the medication. and will talk to the Dr on Wednesday. This is suppose to help too. Not looking for an alternative but just wanted to know if anyone used it... http://www.chewy.com/dog/vetriscience-bladder-strength-dog/dp/42068?utm_source=google-product&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=hg&utm_content=VetriScience&utm_term=&gclid=COyRxuD4hckCFVKDfgodRAcKvQ
  14. On Thursday, I notices our 6 year old female BC had urinated in the house which she has never done. Watching her, I have noticed several spots since Thursday. Saturday, we went to the Vet and two possibilities were suggested. Bladder infection or urinary incontinence. After the results came back today, a bladder infection was ruled out. We are trying electrolyte stimulation but I believe it to be urinary incontinence and the Vet agrees. Tonight when I fed her in the kennel, she laid down and there were 3 small spots of urine. As she walked by, I check her bottom and it was wet so she is leaking even while not sleeping. Having had many dogs, this is a first. She was not put on medication yet because he wanted to see if it was an electrolyte issue but I feel it is not. She is healthy and very active. Has anyone experienced this? What am I to expect with the medication and long term? Thanks… I hate it when the dogs are sick…
  15. We have a 14 run kennel. Each dog is assigned to their own space and it has never changed. When we go into the kennel to feed, I put all of them in a "stay" at the door after I go in. As I walk down the row, starting with the closest run, I call that name and they come to "their" space , go to the next run and call that name and they come and so forth. I would only assume know their space and they will wait because they want the food. This has expanded to other areas such as the back door, pasture gate and so forth. I think their own space was the trick. If I leave the farm and have the need to kennel them all, when I open the kennel door, I state "get in your kennel" they will go stand in front of their door and wait. I have always used easy names that was easy to understand except the rescues that already had names when they came in such as Abby, Gabby Annie, but they do fine. Eye contact also helps when I call them.
  16. I agree 100% it's not optional. With my 10 dogs, when I kennel them to feed, they will wait at the kennel door to be called, and 1 by 1, I call their name until all of them are in, makes it much more peaceful. Even at the back door, if I am letting one inside, I call the name of the one coming in and the others wait. They usually have to wiggle in-between the ones waiting. This is a must if you are only letting a few inside. ..
  17. We board a lot of dogs on the farm and their is nothing worse than to call a dog and it walks or runs the other way. We have 10 acres that is fenced but at night they need to be close to home and I don't want to go out in the dark and look for them. Remember, you will need to do what works for you. I personally have 10 dogs and they all have great recall and will come to me even if they know they are in trouble. It's something I did not work on but it just came, but I am the alpha and they are with me 24/7 which make a difference, I think. Things I do, remember, recall is hard to get. 1. "name" come here! once. If they don't come, wait 20 seconds, do it again... don't change anything. At that point, if possible put them is a sit, which is usually easy and walk to them. Don't scold or show any emotions, they will fear that you will punish them and NEVER punish them at this time because they will most likely NOT come to you the next time. If you have to call their name and command 4 - 6 times, you are training them that "that" is the numbers of times you will say it before they come. 2. When they come, praise them and make their trip worth it to them, they will remember and it will be easier to them the next time. 3. You can use a long line. Start with a short distance and work your way to 20 to 30 feet. Nane, come here. Treat and praise when they come. A gentle nudge may be needed to keep their attention. If they love a certain toy or ball, use that for a long distance treat. Name, come here, show ball and they will usually run to you. Make it exciting for them to come to you, they will learn Here at the farm, I start with small distances 10 - 50 feet and in eyesight off line. name, come here, show treat and they will run to me. I will go for a walk with them and carry treats but let the distance increase up. Same thing, name, come hear, treat. What you are shooting for, is even when they are out of sight but hear their name, command, you get a positive response. Remember make them want to come to you when you identify who you want, remember I have 10 and if they hear my voice, they will come. Some people say use name, "come" one word. I use two but in reality, because they know it's going to be positive, I can just their name... "but it's a whole other to try to recall him when he's not even aware I exist. If he sees another dog, person, rabbit, water, squirrel, or something else odd, he's gone before I even realize what's happened. " Again, recall is one of the hardest things to teach 100% and if something pulls them away it will be hard to call them back after the fact. The thing to watch for, it you know it can be iffy, watch their tail and body language and if you see interest in something, don't wait until they are off, be proactive and call them down before they run... There are many good ideas out there and something else might work better, do what works for you. This works for me...
  18. How old is he and what home training has he had?
  19. It seems a little late for a spay, Most reasons are good but something to remember, the bitch will also seek out a male to breed which will result in a female leaving her property to "hook up" with a male. If an older dog was altered late in life, they can still mate but won't produce. This could result in Canine Brucellosis, Canine Herpesvirus or Canine Transmissible Venereal Tumors. All are Canine Sexually Transmitted Disease. Just something to think about.
  20. When we work with rescue BC's, nearly all of them come in the same, afraid of most everything and anything. It took me 3 weeks to be able to touch one and it was when I was on the floor to watch him and he came to me and licked my face (his terms). When I went to touch him, he pulled it away. With the many I have worked with, it is always on their terms. If you push it, they are uncomfortable and will draw back. They will come to you, which is what they want in time. Good talk and communication frequently helps. You want to be her friend but in charge. The more you can do, the more she will respond. To her, things are strange and new and she doesn't know how to process it at time. The more places you both can go and the more people she can meet, the better. She needs to KNOW that other people and dogs are good. Set her up with good dogs and friendly people until she can realize it. Watch the signals from her tail and be pro-active and halt the issues as soon as you see it going up. Build on every little success. You will never get her to come to you by pulling her to you just like you won't teach a dog to dock dive by throwing them in. I've seen both. "Seeing him open the gate, she gave a little growl and bark - definitely cluing in that the yard was her territory and he didn't belong there." Give the boy a treat or toy, something she likes and start speaking even before he comes through the gate so not to startle her. Have him show her the treat/toy and "baby talk", make her want to see him and even look forward to him and use several people if possible, the more the better. But I also want her to be able to calm herself and manage visitors. Watch for her signals when this happens and let her know everything is OK and and call her off. She is trying to be the Alpha and she need to learn that you are in charge.
  21. I wrote this several years ago for people buying a border collie, not true for everyone but may help since you are new with breeders. http://buyingabcpuppy.blogspot.com/
  22. We always learn from everything we do. Hopefully the owner will make some changes. Is their a way that you can contact the owner and check on the dog and possibility help if needed? The owner may appreciate some help.
  23. I had a Husky once... That being said, your relationship with your dog will change, sometimes better, sometimes worse. In 6 months will you love it or regret it, time will tell. Is their a chance that you could clean him up, get him current on Vac's and take some great photos of him. Their is a great home for him, it may take some effort but will be well worth it and you'll get some good satisfaction too. If he is UTD and clean and you have spent some time with him, you can give a good account of him if you are trying to find him a home and at this point, you will know his quirks and personality.
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