Jump to content
BC Boards

Liz P

Registered Users
  • Content Count

    5,094
  • Joined

Everything posted by Liz P

  1. Haven't seen any I would touch at that price.
  2. $1200 for an 8 week old pup from Open trial winning parents with hip scores and a full DNA panel. Pups BAER and CERF checked. So for those pups? $300 maybe.
  3. Dr. Freeman is one of the smartest, hardest working, most ethical veterinarians you could ever meet. If she is concerned about nutritional DCM and recommends avoiding certain diets, I would take her advice. She is a clinical nutritionist first and foremost and has her patients' best interest at heart. She has indeed been paid to do some research for big pet food companies, including helping some of them develop new therapeutic diets. I assure you that her intent is pure and she is the last person to endorse a food unless she believes in it. I would refer clients to her and happily follow her advice for my own pets. In fact, I have fed one of my dogs (who was diagnosed with heart disease 5 years ago) a diet she developed in conjunction with a cardiologist and other colleagues to help slow the progress of heart disease in dogs.
  4. Nothing I ever say will be good enough for you. I am hoping to make people stop and think before they blindly follow the advice of pet store employees trying to sell them food.
  5. For the last 10 years I've fed almost exclusively one brand, aside from a period during which I could not get it due to shipping issues. The first ingredients were fish meal, chicken meal and corn. A brief history of DCM in pets: Phase one took place many decades ago, before my time. Vets noticed lots of cats are dying of this new form of heart disease. They did some research. Oops! Turned out cats are really dependent on taurine, so they changed things to make sure they get plenty in their diets. Phase two took place a few decades ago. I know some of the researchers who were involved. People were starting to become more conscious of dog food and demanding of "all natural" and new and exciting things like novel proteins. Back then, novel meant stuff like lamb instead of chicken and rice instead of corn. Rare cases of DCM in breeds not known to suffer from it popped up. More research was done. All these dogs were found to be eating one of a few brands of food. Back then, there just weren't many brands of food, so the pattern was easier to spot in one sense, but harder in the sense that most people still fed the mainstays like Purina and Hills. At this point researchers realized that dogs, like cats, could also suffer from nutritional DCM. The companies were approached and claimed to have fixed the issue, though vets were still getting reports of nDCM occasionally. Still, not many people fed these brands, so the general public was, for the most part, blissfully unaware. Phase three started about 15 years ago. People were really starting to become obsessed with dog food. More brands hit the market. They were touting more natural formulas, high in animal proteins and low in plant products (Innova Evo for example). They were indeed mostly protein. They had their hearts in the right place. Then things got out of hand. Their marketing worked too well. All of a sudden grain free was all the rage. More and more pet owners started to switch. Phase four started more recently, maybe 5 years ago. By this time grain free was everywhere. You were a horrible pet owner if you were feeding corn. Companies saw big money. Everyone was rushing grain free formulas to the market. As is typical of companies, they wanted to maximize profit. As pet owners become more educated about food, they had to become trickier to do so. Pet owners wanted to see high protein levels. Pet food companies started to add more and more plant based proteins to artificially increase the tested levels. They started to add peas and other legumes in increasing amounts, slowly eroding at the actual amount of animal based protein in their diets. Pet owners became aware of reading labels and that ingredients listed higher were found in larger amounts (by weight). They wanted to see "real meat at the first ingredient." Pet food companies got smart. Things like meat meal are nutrient dense whereas something like fresh, deboned chicken breast is mostly water. So by weight, fresh meat would appear high on a list while actually containing relative low nutrient density. They also started ingredient splitting. Instead of listing peas or whole peas, they would list the components separately (pea fiber, pea protein, etc). This would bump the components lower on the list of ingredients. What does that mean on a label? A food that has ground yellow corn as their number one ingredient and poultry byproduct meal as the second ingredient may actually contain a lot more animal protein that a food that lists fresh chicken meat as their number one and potato starch, pea fiber, pea protein as their next few ingredients. So now all of a sudden we have a massive number of people feeding these new diets and a huge shift in ingredients. And then the DCM cases started to pour in.
  6. How in the world does logic bring you to that conclusion? We've known for decades which brands cause it. It's not ALL foods. It's certain foods. These new fad diets do NOT have any research behind them. Any fool celebrity can put out their own brand.
  7. Nutritional DCM has been around for a long time. We just saw a huge surge in it when people started feeding brands that had zero feeding trials behind them. I know vets who have been researching this for decades. I see no reason for people to be taking a huge risk and feeding diets with nothing more than good marketing behind them when foods proven through research to be nutritionally complete are available.
  8. Please do not feed 4Health. It's one of over 40 foods that has been found to cause heart failure in dogs. Right now Royal Canin, Purina, Hills, Eukanuba and Iams are on the list of brands with no cases. Corn does not cause diarrhea in most dogs. Parasites, sudden change in diet and other things will cause diarrhea. There is no one dewormer that kills all parasites, so it's best to have a fecal sample sent to a lab to check prior to deworming.
  9. These are all questions for your vet. Take a fresh poop sample with you to your appointment. Diarrhea is not normal in a pup, even after transitioning to a new home, unless you changed the pups kibble or gave her new treats/chews she isn't used to. Some bitches do produce consistently tiny pups. If they are healthy, I don't worry too much. However, diarrhea is not healthy (parasites, IGS, IBD, EPI, etc). Pups can also suffer from a wide variety of health problems such as liver shunts, pure malnutrition and pituitary dwarfism (rare) among others. Were your pups' parents DNA tested for IGS?
  10. Kids or not, Ned was not an appropriate first time dog for you. You need a stable, even tempered animal. Ned will be a challenge even for an experienced dog trainer.
  11. PennHIP scores are highly heritable. So if you want to make breeding decisions, that is what I recommend. OFA scores are poorly heritable.
  12. The FDA "update" is just a standard release of the original safety info. I've sold tens of thousands of doses of flea/tick meds in that drug class and have only seen a few seizures in dogs who already had epilepsy. I've seen a little stomach upset. Otherwise, they appear to be extremely safe. I use Bravecto and sometimes Nexguard for my own dogs.
  13. There is a DNA panel for HD offered by Idexx that looks at multiple genes. It was developed using Labrador retrievers and is only being recommended for that breed. The results are not considered particularly accurate and at this time I don't know of anyone using them to make breeding decisions. I've been tempted to send in samples on a few of my dogs (since I could get the test at minimal cost) just to see how far off they are from their PennHIP scores.
  14. I've found over the years that 2 neutered males are the best buddies. That said, I've seen littermate brothers try to kill one another. Two females, even spayed, can sometimes fight and even kill one another (bitch fights are the scariest IMHO). A male and female often get along well, but their play styles are different (girls rule!) so the relationship is a bit more one sided. No rules are set in stone, this has been based on both my experiences and observations over the years.
  15. Sigh, another biased article with poor information in the anti vaccine camp. Please refer to real studies, not opinion articles. We have too much anti vaccine BS right now. Please provide references to actual studies. Demonstration of 1-year duration of immunity for attenuated Bordetella bronchiseptica vaccines in dogs. Vet Ther. Winter 2008;9(4):257-62. Craig Lehar1, Huchappa Jayappa, Jason Erskine, Alicia Brown, Diane Sweeney, Terri Wassmoen 1 Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health, Elkhorn, NE 68022, USA. Abstract Three groups of healthy dogs with low antibody titers to Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb), canine parainfluenza virus (CPI), and canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) were used in this study. One group was vaccinated with a single dose of monovalent attenuated Bb vaccine and one group with a trivalent vaccine containing attenuated Bb, CPI, and CAV-2; dogs were vaccinated intranasally with a single dose of the respective vaccines. The third group served as unvaccinated controls. All vaccinated dogs subsequently developed serum antibody titers to Bb that persisted for at least 1 year. Following Bb challenge 1 year after vaccination, all vaccinated dogs, regardless of group, showed significantly fewer clinical signs and shed significantly fewer challenge organisms than unvaccinated controls. These results demonstrate that intranasal administration of a single dose of monovalent attenuated Bb vaccine or trivalent vaccine containing attenuated Bb, CPI, and CAV-2 provides 1 year of protection against Bb. Comparison of the mucosal immune response in dogs vaccinated with either an intranasal avirulent live culture or a subcutaneous antigen extract vaccine of Bordetella bronchiseptica Vet Ther. Spring 2007;8(1):32-40. Randy Davis1, Huchappa Jayappa, Omar Y Abdelmagid, Rob Armstrong, Diane Sweeney, Craig Lehr 1 Schering Plough Animal Health, 21401 West Center Road, Elkhorn, NE 68022. Abstract Healthy dogs with low antibody titer to Bordetella bronchiseptica were vaccinated intranasally with an avirulent live vaccine, subcutaneously with an antigen extract vaccine, or subcutaneously and intranasally with a placebo. Intranasally vaccinated dogs developed B. bronchiseptica-specific IgA titers in nasal secretions that remained at high levels until the end of the study; dogs vaccinated subcutaneously with the antigen extract or placebo did not develop measurable antigen-specific IgA titers in nasal secretions. Dogs were challenged with virulent live B. bronchiseptica 63 days after vaccination. Intranasally vaccinated dogs had significantly lower cough scores (P < or =.0058) and shed significantly fewer challenge organisms (P <.0001) than dogs in either of the other groups. Cough scores of subcutaneously vaccinated dogs were not significantly different from placebo-vaccinated dogs.
  16. I didn't take her response as snarky. It's hard to interpret people's "tone of voice" in posts on the internet. If I was in your shoes, I would get the pup vaccinated by the breeder 2 weeks prior to coming to your home. No, it's not a guaranteed way to prevent it, but it will stack the odds in your favor. Kennel cough is more akin to whooping cough, but your average dog does not get terribly sick from it. Puppies, immune suppressed, short nosed, elderly dogs would be higher risk. The rare dog will get pneumonia, but that really isn't common. Now canine influenza really makes them ill. That is a whole different ball of wax.
  17. Yes, Orastrips are still available. I've worked in high end specialty, high end general practice, low cost urban and low cost rural practices. I've never seen a $1,0000 cleaning. I have seen a dental that total that much with advanced extractions, full mouth radiographs and other procedures above and beyond a cleaning.
  18. I make recommendations based on what is best for the pet's health, not based on what I think the client wants to hear. Just because you can't see disease with the naked eye does not mean there is absence of disease. Dental infection smells. The dog was not lacking in symptoms and she was my own, so I can do as I please. Like I said, we were a pilot hospital they asked to use the test strip to see if they worked well. They did. We found a direct correlation between the score that the strip gave and periodontal disease.
  19. Says who? If you are not a vet, how do you know? I see dogs all the time suffering from severe dental disease. The bacteria from their rotten teeth can damage their hearts, kidneys, brain, etc. I've seen dogs with such rotten mouths that they had fractured jaws. I've done countless dental cleans and extractions on old dogs. Their owners call me back a month later and rave about how they are acting like a puppy again, that they had no idea how much pain the teeth must have been causing the dog.
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500115/ https://www.drugs.com/vet/orastrip-quickcheck-canine.html
  21. I did dental radiographs on my own dog because her breath was a bit stinky, plus we were one of the hospitals selected to try out some new test strips that detect periodontal disease in dogs. Her test strip showed high grade disease despite nearly pristine looking teeth (virtually no tartar and her gums looked pretty normal too). I was skeptical, but sure enough, when we took pictures, she had bone loss. She had her teeth cleaned plus had an antibiotic gel injected along her gums. Since then I've kept up with regular cleaning and antibiotic treatments. I tell my clients all the time that a visual inspection of the mouth can only go so far. Too often I've found teeth that looked great were in fact badly infected below the gum line.
  22. Veterinarian here. Dental health and the rate of tartar buildup in dogs are largely influenced by genetic factors such as the amount of saliva they produce, enamel strength and how the teeth line up. Brushing daily with an enzymatic toothpaste absolutely does help. Raw fed dogs do not magically have perfect teeth. I see plenty with bad periodontal disease that is invisible unless you take dental X-rays. Crunchy kibble does not clean your dog's teeth. If that were true, I could eat lots of ginger snaps and have a perfect mouth. Not going to happen.
  23. Do you know if testing for addition diseases is added in the future, will owners will automatically get those results? For example, if someone were to order their test now, prior to the EAOD test being released, would the owner get the EAOD results once the test was available?
  24. Do we know yet what other DNA tests will be offered in a package with the EOD gene and what that panel will cost?
×
×
  • Create New...