Jump to content
BC Boards

CleoDog

Registered Users
  • Content Count

    10
  • Joined

  • Last visited

    Never

Everything posted by CleoDog

  1. What the AKC is doing is lying down with a dog (Santorum). I hope they're scratching from all the fleas....yuck! http://www.dumpsantorum.com/ http://www.santorumexposed.com (this one was down when I checked, but it's great!) Michele
  2. Ugh, don't be sure! I bought the first one, and was so very sorry that I wasted the money. I just absolutely don't get his bias against rescue. It's really a shame...he's popular enough to do lots of damage. Michele
  3. I absolutely agree that the highest end 20% do exist, and that they're not right for a family like Mike's. Sometimes, though, it seems like I hear lots and lots of silliness about dogs being "over the top" when really what the poor dog needs is for momma to take her finger off the ON switch. So, Mike, check out rescues. They will know their dogs. Be honest with yourself about what you'll likely offer a dog DAILY, and then relay that to the rescue group. If you plan to hike 10 miles on the weekends, but will be lucky to get the dog out for five frisbee throws during the week, don't be afraid to say so. Your answers to their questions will shape their opinion about what dog will do best in your house, and the more honest you are, the happier you will all be in the end. Best of luck. Michele
  4. "There are definitely BCs that do not require this much exercise, but if you are set on having a great frisbee dog, the drive required to play frisbee may have a whole related suite of behavioral traits that would not suit your wife one bit!" Well, let's clarify. Is Mike looking for a dog to play Frisbee with in the back yard, or a competition superstar? If he is looking for a buddy to play with and one that will get him outside, it need not be a monster like you described. That's why an adult rescue is the perfect option. I think that some of this crazy behavior that's being described is probably due to bored dogs with a total lack of anything meaningful to do. But on the other hand, some of it is because of the owners. I've heard people talking, and it's almost like having a "my dog is crazier than your dog because he does a, b, and c" conversation equals bragging rights?! Color me confused...Give them what they need and then teach them to settle! Michele
  5. Hi, I'm sorry that you have to deal with making a decision like this. I would not think Sam a good candidate for placement. As you said, there are people out there who are capable of handling a "Sam", but how long must you wait before one of them decides they'd like to take on a project dog? You could keep him indefinitely and try to re-hab him, but that might end up being a real drain on precious resources. And it would be a shame for one dog to jeopardize your whole program. Follow your gut on this one. Best of luck. Michele
  6. I volunteer with MABCR, the group Rebecca suggested. If you wish, please apply! Read the website, it will give you a good understanding of how our process works. When filling out the application, please keep an open mind about the age of dog you'd consider and also whether or not you'd consider a mix. One gentleman adopted an eight year old female a couple of years ago. She adapted beautifully and is still his trail running partner! As others have said, sometimes an older mix can be a dream. They're easy to house train, they're settled a little, and they're fully developed, so are ready to go with whatever your family has in mind (they can begin being conditioned to be your jogging partner, can start playing frisbee, or maybe agility for fun?). Puppies are tiny for so short a time...plus they chew, chew, chew, need frequent bathroom breaks, etc. The screening process is thorough, and that allows us to determine which dog is best for you. We will not send you "more dog" than your family can manage. Plus there is support available for the lifetime of the dog if problems arise. I believe that all of what I've said is probably true of most good rescue groups, so do some searching around, and follow your instincts. Good luck! Michele
  7. Alaska, both links are to the TTouch book. I'd really appreciate it if you could re-post Karen Ovreall's storm phobia link. I'd really like to read the article. Thanks! Michele and Cleo (who's growing increasingly anxious about fireworks and storms)
  8. Hi, Along with the Clean Run issue mentioned, there is lots to be found in the AgilityAction magazine...lots of foundation and puppy work scattered throughout all of the issues. If you subscribe, you'll get access to ALL of the back issues since it's an online magazine. http://www.agilityaction.com (this is done by the woman who does Laughing Dog Press...you know, the Church of the Diving Border Collie) Michele
  9. I have read about the concerns of rescuers on numerous lists. A few posts seemed to indicate that the USDA does not regulate not-for-profit organizations, but the majority are concerned. Initially I thought that because rescue dogs aren't "sold", but rather an "adoption donation" is collected, that there was little need for concern. Lots of folks are indicating that there is no distinction, that if money is exchanged, the statute applies. So from a rescue standpoint, I'm not sure what to think of it. Michele
  10. Hi! Glad to hear that your girl is home and mostly well. Just a thought...If you ever get brave enough to feed raw bones again, maybe try feeding them frozen. It might slow her down, and it has the added bonus of leaving little or no mess behind! That's how I feed my girl her RMBs. It started when I got lazy and forgot to defrost, but she likes them that way and it's more or less mess-free. Michele
×
×
  • Create New...