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Sue R

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About Sue R

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    Bark less, wag more

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Bruceton Mills WV
  • Interests
    Stockdogs, horses, chocolate

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  1. This section of the forums is for asking training questions of an expert. You might get better response if you post this in "Under the Handlers' Tent" and/or the "General" section, where it will be noticed by more members and not flag the resident expert that she has a question to answer.
  2. One other thing you might consider is whether or not there is a noise (microwave beep, smoke alarm, etc.) that originates in the kitchen when you are working in there, that has distressed her and caused her to associate you being in the kitchen with something very anxiety-provoking to her. I have had one or more dogs that were very reactive to certain high-pitched sounds and this is one thing you might want to rule out as a source of her reactions.
  3. Sue R

    Periodic Incontinence

    Yes, this.
  4. Sue R

    Elderly dog's possible seizure?

    Fingers and toes crossed but so far she has not had any other episodes. She is having a bit of digestive issues today (diarrhea this morning, and a sluggish appetite occasionally lately, but I'll chalk that up to the long-standing kidney failure) but that seems to be resolving. We love them to get old because we hate to part with them, but old age comes with its own problems. Meanwhile, she'll be 16 on Sunday and is still doing quite well - she's an active, happy, and contented dog, and who could ask for more?
  5. Has anyone ever had a dog (I'm talking my old dog Celt) who would occasionally hold their tail tightly-wrapped around the hind leg, almost like they were trying to balance? And then, shortly after, would relax and go back to holding it normally? I'm wondering if Celt isn't getting a bit shakier in the hind end and this is a reaction to feeling a bit of a hind end balance problem. It's almost always to the right side but this morning, when he had the longest episode of this I've seen, he did do it to the left side just briefly after an extended time (maybe five minutes or so) of holding it to the right. It wraps tightly, just like when he's balancing for a hard turn or stop, somewhat like it is in this photo by Michelle Dobbs, but wrapped more tightly forward around his thigh.
  6. Sue R

    Another vet question

    I wonder if you could have an abnormality in a small capillary? I'm sure the vet will be able to diagnose and, hopefully, easily deal with this. Best wishes!
  7. Sue R

    Hyperextension front feet

    Well, "...landed on his feet with your family, though, he deserves a nice life..." sums it up. I'm not excusing the neglect but, as a farmer for several decades along with being a mother of four, I know how easy it is to let some things slide when other things are apparently more pressing. At least the farmer seemed to have a decent heart and is glad for Fleet to have gotten in what seems to be a very good home with you. Very best wishes!
  8. Sue R

    Hyperextension front feet

    Welcome back! Lovely dogs! I can't really contribute any sort of advice but hope to hear what your vet has to say. Sometimes a consult with an orthopedic vet can be called for in a case where the "general practice" vet wants a more expert opinion. I don't know if that will be needed or is even an option for you. We have a somewhat similar thing here - our Megan, who came to us at nine months of age, had been crated much of her young life. She was overweight, lacked muscle tone, had some compulsive behaviors (like pulling all the hair out of her tail), and looked like a hairy sausage with legs. And her front feet/legs were very "easty-westy" or pointing outward rather than inward. We attribute at least some of that to growing without proper exercise and muscle development. They have never been as strong as well-built legs but I have to say that at 16 years of age this month, she is still very mobile, putting in anywhere from two to four miles of walks a day (she and my other very senior dog have been slowing down during this hot summer, with usually just a one mile walk each morning and evening, but sometimes a longer walk in the morning as well as the evening mile, and sometimes even another 4/10 of a mile just before bedtime). Neglect is inexcusable, and he's fortunate to be in your care now. Hopefully, exercise and nutrition plus good vet care will help him to lead a good and sound, active life. The vet may possibly find there is something else leading to his diminished stamina, or could it have something to do with hot summer weather? Or, rather than diminished stamina, is he developing instincts that are resulting in him playing differently, with less running and more eyeing? Although having good angles, etc., on the skeleton is helpful and tends toward better soundness, many "imperfect" animals lead very normal, very active lives. Here's hoping that your Fleet gets a good report from the vet, and goes on to do well for a long time to come!
  9. Sue R

    Elderly dog's possible seizure?

    Thanks for replies! Doubt vestibular has anything to do with it - no eye movements or other eye or balance issues that would indicate that. She has had a mild heart murmur for about three years now. I had her scheduled for a tooth cleaning and that's when that was discovered, shortly after she was diagnosed with the kidney failure. Her kidney values have stayed reasonably consistent, with only a gentle trend towards worsening, over the 3 1/2 years since her diagnosis. I have had her on a home-prepared diet, following guidelines from the Yahoo group k9kidneydiet. I just got home a few minutes ago - she has been fine all day. Fingers and toes crossed that it's just a one-off but I know that could be wishful thinking. Again, thank you all!
  10. Remember, please, that while the deadline has passed for inclusion in the printed program, it is never too late to sponsor a team - you will still get passes, a cap, etc., and be announced when your team is on the field. Also, you will be eligible for a cash prize if your team places first or second in either Open or Nursery (or you can choose to give your cash prize back to the Finals, as some folks do).
  11. Remember, please, that while the deadline has passed for inclusion in the printed program, it is never too late to sponsor a team - you will still get passes, a cap, etc., and be announced when your team is on the field. Also, you will be eligible for a cash prize if your team places first or second in either Open or Nursery (or you can choose to give your cash prize back to the Finals, as some folks do).
  12. I'm hoping some dog friends can help me here - this morning, on the way back from the old dogs' shorter walk, I think Megan (who will turn sixteen in fifteen days) had a seizure. She's never had one before that we are aware of. Right in front of me, as we were standing while Shana gave treats to her horses, she fell down on her side, with her neck strongly contracted back, and lay there paddling her feet. She lay like that for a few moments, her feet stopped paddling, and then either she or I eased her head back to a more normal position, where she laid for another minute or two, initially whining as she breathed (not a "throat whine" but a "nose whine"). She stopped the whining and lay there a bit more, then rolled up on her chest, where we let her rest a couple of minutes before she got up with a little help from me, and we walked home. She acted on the way home like absolutely nothing had happened (and I've heard that dogs that have seized can do just that, walk off like nothing ever happened). One of two things happened, I believe. Either she had a seizure or another dog bumped her rump and it knocked her over, and she hit her head on the road when she landed and/or had the breath knocked out of her. However, I did not see or notice another dog bump her - I thought they were all pretty stationary when this happened but I could have missed something. Or, less likely but possibly, her hind end gave out (which is not usual for her - it is her front end that occasionally fails) and she fell and hit her head. Can anyone with experience give their opinion or advice?
  13. It's not too late to sponsor a dog/handler team for the 2018 National Sheepdog Finals! But today is the last day to place your sponsorship and get that information in the program. Sponsors will be accepted after today and will be announced when their teams run, but the program deadline is today! This is such a great way to show your support for a favorite handler, mentor, trainer, friend, or a favorite dog, or even for someone you don't know but you want to sponsor as your way of supporting the showcase of the North American working Border Collies! It's easy enough to do at the website, and you'll know you are giving valued financial support to the 2018 National Sheepdog Finals as your show your support for a team (or two, or three...) of your choice! You can select to sponsor teams individually or both dogs for any one handler, and will receive VIP passes, VIP parking, access to the Handlers' Tent, sponsor hats, and 15% off all merchandise in the tent at the Finals! Each sponsorship is just $125 and be assured that your sponsorship will go to supporting the best of North American working sheepdogs and their handlers as they compete in Alturas CA from September 24-29. You can sponsor teams in the Open and the Nursery competitions. Don't have $125 to spare? Get together with a friend or friends, and sponsor a team as a group! I've been part of many groups that ranged from two to five participants, each chipping in as little as $20-25 each. One person makes the sponsorship, and the others reimburse her for their part - easy-peasy! It's a lost-cost way to help out when doing it by yourself is not an option. Or when you want to spread your support over multiple teams! https://www.sheepdogfinals.org/dog-sponsorships
  14. It's not too late to sponsor a dog/handler team for the 2018 National Sheepdog Finals! But today is the last day to place your sponsorship and get that information in the program. Sponsors will be accepted after today and will be announced when their teams run, but the program deadline is today! This is such a great way to show your support for a favorite handler, mentor, trainer, friend, or a favorite dog, or even for someone you don't know but you want to sponsor as your way of supporting the showcase of the North American working Border Collies! It's easy enough to do at the website, and you'll know you are giving valued financial support to the 2018 National Sheepdog Finals as your show your support for a team (or two, or three...) of your choice! You can select to sponsor teams individually or both dogs for any one handler, and will receive VIP passes, VIP parking, access to the Handlers' Tent, sponsor hats, and 15% off all merchandise in the tent at the Finals! Each sponsorship is just $125 and be assured that your sponsorship will go to supporting the best of North American working sheepdogs and their handlers as they compete in Alturas CA from September 24-29. You can sponsor teams in the Open and the Nursery competitions. https://www.sheepdogfinals.org/dog-sponsorships
  15. Yay for you and Gibbs!
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