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Rigby

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  1. Immediate play inside is tough with the weather, but I'll try and figure something out she can do on towels to clean her paws haha. Catching thrown treats is hugely rewarding for her so we'll increase that while I think of other fun ideas haha And I completely forgot about long lines! Oh my gosh thank you. I'll get something she can drag around tomorrow! Thank you so much!
  2. Almost always my young dog has pretty great recall and wants to make the right choices and she tries very hard to be a good dog. Lately though we've been having an issue where she does not want to come back into the house after playing or going potty. She'll walk right up to the door and then she gets this gleam in her eye, jumps back and won't come in or get within arms reach. I cannot just leave her in the yard for a lot of reasons. Also, she doesn't particularly dislike being alone. I have started taking her out on leash to use the bathroom. She happily does this. When taking her out to play now I do a lot of recalls and collar grabs, with rewards of food or continued play and a few times of bringing her in and rewarding her for coming in by letting her right back out. She always gets a bit of food for coming in as well. I can see we are having some improvement, but, it is slow going, and the fact that she has learned this game/behavior makes me nervous she might do it in a more dangerous or urgent situation. Any suggestions, ideas or critiques are welcome! Thank you!
  3. Our two got their very special twice a year (thanksgiving and Christmas) meal ♥️ yes it's a lot of treats for the little guy, but he's old, and his tummy can tolerate it and he deserves it.
  4. My husband, who never asked to live with a young dog, and, would probably never do so without me his life, can be a little short with Winter on occasion. I step in, manage her as needed and if he gets very tired of her antics I put her in the crate, take her for a walk or make her up a food dispensing toy. I do all of this without really talking to my husband, just reading his body language and tone with her. He does love her very much, he'll just love her a lot more in a few years. Haha As we were working out this system I said to him that if I couldn't stop him yelling by discussing the behavior with him I'd prevent it by managing her. He doesn't love this arrangement but tolerates it and I'm finding he's getting much better at asking her to do things (like sit or get off the couch, cues she knows) before he becomes overly frustrated with her or I step in. I did also train, positively, the cue 'stop' and she will basically jump back and freeze. I chose the word based on what he says naturally and the behavior I suspected he wanted when he said it. The reward has always being able to resume the game, or play a new game which also often happens naturally in their interaction. He does not know I did this, I assume I could have told him but I wasn't confident it would work and I didn't want him just trying it out willy-nilly. I am not sure this is the best advice for you, your dog, or the relationship but it seems to be working well enough for us and our situations and challenges seem very simmilar.
  5. I had bc mix tested for MDR1 (via Embark to find out her breed and other health stuff), it's easy enough and if you just want MDR1 tested it runs about 50 or so. Also if you are in contact with the breeder it may be that the parents of your pups were tested and you don't even need to test.
  6. And yes, she did roll after I put the camera away and before I could get her. Even my Chihuahua likes to roll in the dirt. Just dogs being dogs, no need for concern.
  7. Aw thanks for all the compliments on her
  8. You can also smear some peanut butter on a plate, or honestly I'll just smear it right on the floor in the laundry room... He'll be busy licking it and you can have both hands to brush
  9. I got my pup in March and came here pretty concerned about some stuff. I got lots of excellent level headed advice that is part of why is decided to keep this wonderful dog. She still has some days where I give her a little to much trust or she decides to be a little naughty but I couldn't be happier with her over all! Thank you so much. Also we got her DNA tested, Here's a link if you're curious. EMBK.ME/ADVENTUREDOGWINTER And of course some photos
  10. Might be, might not be. I thought mine was all bc, turns out she is half border collie, 1/4 malamute and the other quarter is ACD and aussie. Here she is at about that age and now at almost a year
  11. Just saw this but my BC was bitten in the on the top of the head, only a one fang bite, did the full ER very treatment including antivenin. It was a western diamond back rattlesnake. She lost a lot of stamina and confidence following the bite and stopped wanting to do our casual herding lessons (she was at the dog park when bitten.) Three years after the bit she developed an enormous mass on her liver and then had something go very wrong with her kidneys we couldn't get diagnosed before she passed away. UC Davis vet was interested in the snake bite history, but, unfortunately we have no idea if anything was actually related to the bite. The stamina/confidence decrease I blame 100% on the snake bite.
  12. Awesome! Thank you, I'm feeling much better about it and you've all saved me buying (and lugging around!) A travel crate.
  13. She's so pretty!! For the car the drooling might be motion sickness not nervousness... For the crate I think you'll need to desensitize/counter condition it, have you ever clicker trained a dog or used a marker word? If I were you I would close the crate door and stand at a distance from the crate where the dog is very comfortable but can see the crate. Then mark/feed anytime the dog looks over to the crate, she will probably move closer on her own, continue to move closer and closer until the dog is fine all around the crate. Then open the door and start over from that safe distance this should go pretty fast. Then, without the dog in the crate make it 'noisy' open and close the door, tap the sides etc until the crate noises predict food. You may need a friend or helper to make the sounds while you guys stand farther away at first. The important thing with this is that the dog tells you when she's ready to move forward and you never push her toward the crate, even passively, by making her move toward the crate to get a food lure. It will be a much more positive association if she is offering the behavior at her pace. This could take a week or it could take a few months. I can probably do a video with my little dog if you want but I am to lazy to try and move my BCs giant crate haha. Let me know if any of that doesn't make sense, I'm happy to clarify. :-) Also her eating while scared near the crate isn't helping much. Find the point near the crate where she isn't scared and feed her there. And close the door. It doesn't sound like there's any great rush to get her crated so let her set the pace.
  14. She's not resistant to the crate at all. Happily goes in any time and settles down right away at night, well after she arranges her bedding a little, Haha. thank you so much!
  15. Pretend to talk on the phone or call a friend who doesn't mind talking when you work with the dog and drop food in the dogs bed while you're talking, initially at a quick pace and then slowing down to build duration. I really love a treat and train (aka manners minder) for this and it worked wonders for so many behavior troubles with my dog. It taught her how to settle and has been an absolute life saver. I thought I was on your other post when I wrote this, sorry about that, but still I think a treat and train could be really helpful for you
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