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dumbbird7

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  1. Previously, I have posted that 6 month old puppy Jack, 18k, is unwilling to eat his meals in the kitchen, would rather take everything into the sitting room or the hallway. This is still going on. Refused to eat anything yesterday - fresh meat that he has enjoyed before. Knowing he'll refuse it if it gets more than a few hours old, even if kept in the fridge, in a fit of peak, I threw it out for the birds. He ate every bit of it. Can anyone tell me what all this is about please? He gives the impression of being hungry, may condescend to taste a bit, but generally refuses anything I put down. I can leave it down for a brief while then take it up. Or I have left it down longer, assuming that if he's hungry enough, he will eat. Nope. Now, I'm not rich enough to pander to any dog, however much I love him. The meat is clean, and fresh.. Obviously very tasty if it tastes good off the patio. This has to stop, or he goes to live with somone else as it's been a problem almost since the off 3 months ago. I've tiptoed around him, pretended I didn't notice/care. Whatever I'm doing, it ain't working. I have offered to leave his meal in the glass-enclosed outside porch where he is totally private and no-one would be interested in it. No acceptable either. Oh yes, I have tried offering tinned or steamed too, same result. So what's going on in his little head and how can we put it right? He is very healthy and lively, checked by the vet during the week, stools small but comfortably firm, a bit dark though. As far as I am aware, he isn't eating elsewhere else, we're together 24/7 so I'd know. Help, anyone please.
  2. dumbbird7

    Still having feeding problems

    Update: It's early evening here in UK. Jack had lunch in the porch. I put the dish down and left him to it. The dining room door was left ajar to avoid captivity and freak out to refuse everything. However he took only one piece of meat onto the rug. Tattered, threadbare, covered with bags of coal, few logs, mud and all things grimy - utility area. Tonight, last snack in the porch, no problem. Only a few mouthfulls but all eaten in situ. I know him very well now, so one step at a time. Environment of course. When he shows no further signs of grabbing and running for cover, then we have success. The porch is now his dining room. Things should be back to normal by Monday . If I come over all heavy, he'll spook and we'll have to start again. His obedience training is coming on well, loves it, he's loving and affectionate, a tender little flower. My previous collies have been less cerebral shall we say, bright and perceptive as they all are, but Jack is 'knowing' and it's something I can't put my finger on. He knows things, and if I want to be fanciful (I can hear you scoffing, Gentle Lake!) I get the impression he's been here before. Creepy!.. Lovely boy
  3. dumbbird7

    Still having feeding problems

    Yeah, he's a strapping lad is our Jack. Just changed to 2 meals a day and has been off pup food for awhile now. I weaned him onto raw very gradually, chopping tiny bits, just a tablespoons worth and mixing it into his normal food, perhaps with a tiny amount of warm water. Don't think he noticed the gradual increase daily. Took about a week. A raw bone was always received with great joy so that helped, and once a week, a raw chicken wing or thigh. He doesn't mind tinned food but I find one tin goes in, six tins come out, breath smells and often a lot of wind. Keep to raw mostly except when travelling, use trays of Forthglade steamed meat/veggies, or kibble. Does your pup like fish? Jack doesn't but alll my other collies loved a fish dinner from time to time. Lightly boiled cheap white fish fillets., no bones. Not sure where you live and if sardines are available, small tin of sardines in olive oil went down a treat occasionally, good for a snack and good for coat too. But not for Jack unfortunately, no fish thank you Mum. His dad is a tall, slim bc, his mum a dumpier Beaded collie so I guess he has the height of dad and weight of mother. Vet says he'll reach 15 hands the rate he's going Ha ha. His adult teeth are through but for two of the bottom incisors in the middle that seem to be having trouble find the room. However vet says the lower mandible continues growing a little longer so we're just keeping a watching brief. Have just (20 minutes ago) gone out and bought a non-pull harness - oh what bliss. I have resisted because I'd rather train through love than control. My other collies in the past, no problem with this but this young lad is a different kettle of fish altogether. Inside his neat round hard head is a highly tuned computer ready to rule the world. Think he's tuned in to Mr T. Hmmm! We have spent many hours leash training, and walked many miles on the spot to little effect because the world is so exciting and must be explored NOW. Isn't it clever how teeth just appear overnight almost, fascinating to observe, and the coat growing so gradually we never notice until it's time to get the mud out...
  4. dumbbird7

    Still having feeding problems

    He is, as I write, eating hiis breakfast in the outside porch. We've walked down to the shop for the paper (pulling some of the way, harness required methinks) and have now without fuss, put his dish down and left the porch. Lumps of meat still being taken into the adjoining dining room, but we can cope with this. Very old rug, ready to be ditched anyway. Yes Urge to Herd, it looks as though I have one of the super sensitive ones, but this we can cope with too. On our walk, we met joggers running 3 abreast towards up the lane, two blokes on bikes riding along the narrow bit, ladies going to work at Dartington Hall with lots of loud carrier bags flapping around and enlivened by the Christmas spirit, a squirrel I hadn't noticed but of course he had but all under control still. Short cut through the churchyard so a brief respite from the hurly burley of traffic on the main road. He did well. Arrived home after 45 minutes ready for breakfast. Good result.
  5. dumbbird7

    Still having feeding problems

    Highway61, Yes he's getting tiny morsels during our roadwork, leash walking, wait, keep in etc. Perhaps he's getting too many hmmm! I can certainly wait 10 hours before representing the dish, anything's worth a try so we'll give it a go. Thanks for the suggestion.
  6. dumbbird7

    Still having feeding problems

    D'Elle, yes, done this! Gentle Lake, Dogs starving themselves? I don't think so. Common knowledge. And quite frankly, I don't care a hoot if he eats indoors or outside. If outside, the weather is often inclement, (it has been pouring for a fortnight here in Devon) and we have large flocks of Jackdaws and seagulls from the fields, always sitting on the garden fence waiting. The outdoor porch is ideal if he will take to it. Pups refusing to eat is unnerving, t'aint right. Urge to Herd Yes, you're right, I think this is quite likely the environment was the beginning of the problem, but no idea as to what, when or why. The kitchen is quite small floor space 6.5 X 8.5ft Perhaps the washing machine going, or kettle boiling, cutlery being put away. Bowl stands on large mat with rubber backing so it doesn't slip, meant for the front door originally. Always wash dish and always rinse all my washing up stuff, no aromatic washing up liquid for us either. We used to have cats that are especially fussy about this kind of thing. Dog bowl and cups wiped with clean cloth, the rest rinsed and left to drain. I shall leave his dinners on a large mat in the glassed outside porch, and if he leaves it that's his problem. It will be out of the weather, and safe from predators. And it's not his teeth, all are through but thought perhaps gums still a little tender. And anyway, he is refusing fresh mince which is pretty easy on the gums I would have thought. Brilliant help all round, so thanks everyone. It can only get better... Back later
  7. Previously, I have posted that 6 month old puppy Jack, 18k, is unwilling to eat his meals in the kitchen, would rather take everything into the sitting room or the hallway. This is still going on. Refused to eat anything yesterday - fresh meat that he has enjoyed before. Knowing he'll refuse it if it gets more than a few hours old, even if kept in the fridge, in a fit of peak, I threw it out for the birds. He ate every bit of it. Can anyone tell me what all this is about please? He gives the impression of being hungry, may condescend to taste a bit, but generally refuses anything I put down. I can leave it down for a brief while then take it up. Or I have left it down longer, assuming that if he's hungry enough, he will eat. Nope. Now, I'm not rich enough to pander to any dog, however much I love him. The meat is clean, and fresh.. Obviously very tasty if it tastes good off the patio. This has to stop, or he goes to live with somone else as it's been a problem almost since the off 3 months ago. I've tiptoed around him, pretended I didn't notice/care. Whatever I'm doing, it ain't working. I have offered to leave his meal in the glass-enclosed outside porch where he is totally private and no-one would be interested in it. No acceptable either. Oh yes, I have tried offering tinned or steamed too, same result. So what's going on in his little head and how can we put it right? He is very healthy and lively, checked by the vet during the week, stools small but comfortably firm, a bit dark though. As far as I am aware, he isn't eating elsewhere else, we're together 24/7 so I'd know. Help, anyone please.
  8. Jack is now half a year old, born 15 June this year. He is tall, very leggy, and weighs 18 k, or 39.50lbs, and pretty solid, much muscle. His dad was a tall slim BC, mum a Bearded collie.. Can we guess how big he will be when he is, say 18 months and finished growing? He currently measures about 21inches at the shoulder, though measuring is a little tricky as the little blighter refuses to stand straight and still for more than a few seconds. He loves to play with other dogs when we're out in the fields, and seems to choose dogs of his own size and weight but I worry a little about those Bambi legs when I watch the racing and rough and tumble. After 15 minutes or so, I have to step in and spoil the fun, although he has so much energy, it's difficult to find a calmer way to allow him to let off steam without doing any damage. We have a very small patio garden and very small bungalow (so no stairs to worry about thank heavens with regards to legs). But if I reduce his play time he's hovering at 50,000 feet and we're scraping him off the ceilings! We do half hour early morning running loose in the orchard (no jumping), an hour mid afternoon mix of long leash, free run, perhaps other dog or two, and late afternoon another half hour. 2 hours altogether most days. Difficult to keep him in check. Doing mind games, go find, bring me...doing what I call roadwork, leash training, wait, stop, cross over, keep in and so on, doesn't seem to reduce his energy levels. Whatever he's having for dinner, I could do with some...Is 2 hours too long? My old collie took to swimming in rivers when he was 5 months, any depth, any current, loved it. He introduced the pup to his favourite stream several times before his final days and the passion has taken hold. I always felt water is kinder to joints and tires them out, but weather here is too chilly right now. He makes a bee line for any river or little stream he spies, to go in knee deep, so perhaps this will be the way to tire him out when the weather warms up. Lots of rain lately and rivers running high, I maintain it's No Big Deal attitude and let him explore but keep a very watchful eye ready to rescue. Just like when the kids were young...
  9. Jack is now half a year old, born 15 June this year. He is tall, very leggy, and weighs 18 k, or 39.50lbs, and pretty solid, much muscle. His dad was a tall slim BC, mum a Bearded collie.. Can we guess how big he will be when he is, say 18 months and finished growing? He currently measures about 21inches at the shoulder, though measuring is a little tricky as the little blighter refuses to stand straight and still for more than a few seconds. He loves to play with other dogs when we're out in the fields, and seems to choose dogs of his own size and weight but I worry a little about those Bambi legs when I watch the racing and rough and tumble. After 15 minutes or so, I have to step in and spoil the fun, although he has so much energy, it's difficult to find a calmer way to allow him to let off steam without doing any damage. We have a very small patio garden and very small bungalow (so no stairs to worry about thank heavens with regards to legs). But if I reduce his play time he's hovering at 50,000 feet and we're scraping him off the ceilings! We do half hour early morning running loose in the orchard (no jumping), an hour mid afternoon mix of long leash, free run, perhaps other dog or two, and late afternoon another half hour. 2 hours altogether most days. Difficult to keep him in check. Doing mind games, go find, bring me...doing what I call roadwork, leash training, wait, stop, cross over, keep in and so on, doesn't seem to reduce his energy levels. Whatever he's having for dinner, I could do with some...Is 2 hours too long? My old collie took to swimming in rivers when he was 5 months, any depth, any current, loved it. He introduced the pup to his favourite stream several times before his final days and the passion has taken hold. I always felt water is kinder to joints and tires them out, but weather here is too chilly right now, though he makes a bee line for any river or little stream he spies, to go in knee deep, so perhaps this will be the way to tire him out when the weather warms up.
  10. dumbbird7

    ears

    She's a lovely lass, ears notwithstanding!!
  11. dumbbird7

    ears

    Yes probably, I don't have views either way. I think my lad will have floppy ears, currently standing up like spinakers waiting for a Mistral. But something different every day! Still a bit young perhaps. His mother was a Beardie with floppy lugs I think and as he has her brindle shading behind ears, shoulders and his increasingly meaty thighs. Also her greenish eyes. Dad built like a greyhound and all B&W. What a mix. Jack has the Beardie Bounce for sure, 24/7.
  12. dumbbird7

    ears

    All about ears - i read somewhere that the position of the ears are all to do with the amount of calcium in the cartilage the pup absorbs. The more calcium, the more sticky-up they are. Also, the amount of human handling will affect them, the more they are fondled, the more the cartilage will 'give', and become softer. Jack, at 6 months has ears like wind scanners awaiting a Mistral! But soft and held against the head when out walking, or indoors. Mum was a Beardie so perhaps he'll take after her eventually. Dad was a 'racehorse' with the sticky-up variety. Luck of the draw folks.
  13. dumbbird7

    How big will he get?

    My boy Jack ( BC cross Beardie) is now 6 months old and weighs in at 17k, about 37lbs. All legs like Bambi and slim with a waist I could die for. Vet reckons he'll be about 24k when fully grown.
  14. dumbbird7

    Distance

    This an old thread but have just come across it and thought I'd throw in my penny'worth... Difference between wait and stay in our house -' wait while I untie your leash', while I open the car door' until we can cross'. Stay is stay while I go into the shop, while I'm in the library, until I'm ready to go. Wait is quick, stay is longer.
  15. dumbbird7

    The Hall Carpet

    Thanks to everyone who has given such good advice. His meat is always thawed with loose lid and never refridgerated (too cold and not natural). At mealtimes, I find I can be busy in the kitchen, washing up to do, cup of tea to make. The lump of beef is quietly and gently returned to the kitchen if it finds itself elsewhere, like it's No Big Deal. Jack never complains and rarely takes it away again, so hopefully the message is getting through. Somehow, the fact that I mentioned him lifting his leg has been totally taken out of context..I mentioned as it has just begun, and was it a sign that adolescence was on its way? The testing of boundaries? Could this be why he is a little protective of his food? Male dogs lift their legs, Duh! of course they do, we all know this. Most of mine have done it long after neutering too. Leg lifting or otherwise was not the issue here. Would post pics but made a mess the first time I tried and had to delete! Not tech savvy these days, can't keep up.
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