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TaliahtheBC

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About TaliahtheBC

  • Rank
    Junior Member
  • Birthday 09/08/1992

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    san diego california
  • Interests
    Shepherding, NCA, Story telling, Banjo Playing.
  1. This has all been rather useful information, will update after todays lesson.
  2. She definitely needs to widen out and for sure she is sensitive to pressure, She had this timidness and worry of getting in trouble which is why I went back to basics to speed up her flanks and I was just using watch sheep as a release command.
  3. So an update and another question for the masses this morning!: I realized that my dog had not fully grasped the concept of me telling her to watch her sheep and I had not understood the importance of her knowing it, so we went all the way back to zero and I just walked around telling her to watch her sheep and walked away from her and them ( in a safe way) I did this enough times that when we would walk up to the fence she was already looking for them. After doing this I noticed a huge increase in her speed and when I would release her to watch her sheep I would name flanks as she took them just by redirecting her with my body, and this seemed to work.. My conclusion is that while she is sensitive to pressure I had made a training error and let it go unnoticed for too long, my question is how would one go about pushing a more sensitive dog off stock? I love posting the day before training, I get such wonderful feed back from y'all!
  4. I realized today while practicing on rented sheep, that the issue more so then being pressure sensitive was that at the time of making the original post she didnt fully understand what I mean by watch her sheep and I really didnt do a good job of teaching her flanks, sensitive? Yes. But more then that I had made mistakes and stacked training on her faster then she was learning it. So we went back to zero and did a good amount of me walking around and touching the sheep and telling her to watch them, while naming flanks when she was doing them just quietly here and there. Then after it became apparent that she was making the connection I stopped gave her a break went back in, told her to " watch sheep" which focused her then gave her a go bye and she zipped around and brought them back. Way better then the pitter pattering she was displaying. End rant.
  5. Yep shes really just a sensitive little girl but today I kept my eyes on the sheep and not her as much and just telling her to watch em and patting them and walking through them and by the end of the day she was being super confident and working like a natural. I also did not carry a crook and just acted as laid back as possible and gave her full control. Iam going to practice this sunday in a similiar mannerand see if I cannot duplicate results.
  6. Thats precisely what I mean!
  7. So even though my trainer offers to rent sheep for us to work between lessons I keep asking myself how I can get more time on sheep, we live in San Diego county California and there are plenty of people with sheep in the area but would it be rude to just ask them? I have also thought about just talking to ad posters on craigslist of people looking to sell sheep in hopes of networking out some possible work for us to go do, the experience for my girl would be payment enough. Thoughts or advice?
  8. Man I hope to see my girl do big gathers like that someday. She has gotten large flocks for me but not from so far back and they were pretty well grouped already, so awesome!
  9. I have found that in small quarters work she excels, doing a hold or running shoots penning etc shes just fantastic can put sheep in just about anything haha, so hopefully we will get past this, I go for a lesson once a week and then twice the 2nd week so we get a decent amount of time out with them.
  10. Thank you! I think shes got a hard enough will and desire to work coupled with us having a good bond that we can build her up over time or at least I hope. Shes my world and I think she will do good. She is still young after all...plenty of time!
  11. Will this be a lasting behavioral issue or will her attitude towards stock gradually improve and get better as she sheds concern of wrongdoing?
  12. So an update; and Ah I know this from meeting her parents, I think dad had some miniature australian shepherd in him and mom had a little heeler, I work with a trainer at least two times a week and after today we were able to figure out that if I turn my back and give her flanks then she works extremely well. She is pressure sensitive and my eye contact was over pressuring her, so today was good progress and helped point me in the right direction!
  13. Hi there as this is my first post please forgive any grammatical or other forms of error when it comes to terminology. So I have a 16 month old mix of the three most regularly recognized "herding breeds" Aussie, Heeler, and Border collie but the border collie comes through the strongest. With her JHD I was told she was rather keen had a medium strength in her eye and was nice to her stock. Now the problem that Iam finding myself faced with when we go for a lesson is that she holds back, like shes concerned with making an error, she doesnt do this every time but it takes a gratuitous amount of praise to get her to speed up and cover correctly, now she had a bad experience with another trainer before hand but her Tentativness stems more from her intelligence. I have let her back myself and the flock into an arena corner and encouraged her to watch em/get em and then gone back in the field and was able to see how much more focused and turned on she was. Iam going to go back into a smaller area today and see if squaring her flanks up better will maybe help her, she also thinks that when I tell her to get out that she is in trouble. Any help would be great Thank you!
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