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OT (Sorry) - Cat Food


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#1 Jack & Co.

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 03:05 AM

Since the Boards are a little slow these days, I thought I could slip in a off-topic cat question.

I know many folks here have done extensive research on the best diet/food for their dogs and I am impressed with your knowledge. With that in mind, what do you feed your cats? I have a 13-year old skinny cat and an 8-year old fat cat. The older cat has always eaten dry Purina Cat Chow because it was what was affordable and available. The 8-year old grew up eating the same thing and they have always shared a dish. I do give my older cat some canned food just to make sure he gets plenty.

I guess I could say that they also enjoy a "raw diet" because they catch chipmunks and voles in the yard. (Fortunately, no birds!) My vet has always said the ideal food for cats would be "mouse in a can."

I suppose my old cat should have been on a Senior formula long before now and the pudgy cat needs to lose some weight, so I'm curious about what you're feeding the feline members of your family.
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#2 Cheri McDonald

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 03:18 AM

Hey Jack,

We have a 13 year old skinny (always was) cat and our Rob Dogs' cat Nadia is 4 years old and round as a bowling ball. We have been feeding both Senior Formula Felidae for about two years. Pyewachet gets the smaller bites and senior type she needs, and Nadia gets less fat. I am very pleased with it and the Canidae the dogs are on. The cats coats are shiny and less shedding, less stinky cat box. Old Pye who used to just be a lumb under the bed is out and about watching the birds from the window and playing with toys. We supplement Pye with the wet canned food they make as well. Canidae Felidae
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#3 Woodenlion

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 03:23 AM

I feed my cats alley cat kibble. I have tried kibble that is better for them but they flat out refuse to eat it.They will go for the birds instead. So I buy cans of mackrel and salmon at the dollar store and feed them bits of raw liver and chicken. I have one fat old male and one skinny middle aged female. They also have a small ramakin of olive oil by their dishes to keep fur balls moving through their systems. My last two cats lived to be 21 so I guess I am either lucky or doing something right. All of my cats have been rescued from the street.
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#4 Keegan's Mom

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 03:39 AM

I have one healthy size cat (5 years old) and one fat cat (6 years old). The fat cat has lost 2 pounds since going to scheduled/reduced feedings.

We used to feed Purina One because they wouldn't eat the "good stuff". We recently switched to Nutro something or other...can't remember since we just bought it but they love it. I believe it is better for them then what we had been buying. I'm hoping to see an improvement in their coats. The 6 year old cat has dandruff and I'm hoping the better food helps too.

We used to feed canned food once a day but we haven't in a long time now.

#5 Jack & Co.

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 03:51 AM

Both of my cats were "throwaways" also. Mao was trying to cross a busy highway and Lucky was dumped in the parking lot at school.

Lucky has dandruff also and I am hoping that better food will make a difference.

Toni, I am interested in the olive oil? Do they just help themselves or do you put it on their food? Lucky has thick fur (though not long) and she has a problem with hair balls. I brush and brush and collect enough hair to make another cat, but she still hacks up the hair balls.
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#6 juliepoudrier

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 03:52 AM

I feed my six, ranging in age from 2 years to 12 years (all also rescues of one sort or another), a blend of Wellness Super 5 mix and Chicken Soup for the Cat Lover's Soul (adult light). In the past I have fed Science Diet, and Purina. When I moved to Elizabeth City, the cats had problems with urinary struvite crystals for the first time ever (and some of these cats were well on in years even then). I had to change their diet to something that would acidify the urine. The went on Purina UR (veterinary diet). Eventually I started mixing the UR (v. expensive) with premium cat food (Wellness and Chix Soup) and they still remained crystal free. I am convinced that the large amounts of minerals in the water there played a role in the crystal formation. When I moved to central NC, I eventually quit adding in the UR but have kept them on the premium foods on the advice of my holistic vet, who says they will serve to continue to acidify the urine sufficiently.

So, while I fed Purina Cat chow for years, I now feed premium foods because I think it's as important for my cats to have optimum nutrition and ingredients as it is for my dogs.

The cats get free choice kibble, and I split one 5.5-oz. can of cat food between them every morning (unless I'm travelling). It's not a lot, but they like it, so I feed it. But they could do without. And my hunters still catch any mice that try to make their homes in the house (they aren't allowed outside).... Even my IBD cat does well on this diet.

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#7 Jack & Co.

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 04:28 AM

Julie, is Adult Light the same as Senior?

What's IBD?
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#8 juliepoudrier

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 05:21 AM

No, the light is different. I'm not sure the exact difference--I'd have to compare the bags. Probably the light has lower fat and calories, and the senior has lower protein and fat, but I'm just guessing.

IBD = irritable bowel disease (many things give her diarrhea, including changing from Wellness/Chix/UR to just Wellness/Chix or back again).

J.

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#9 donna frankland (uk)

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 05:43 AM

mine have raw lamb, pork, beef, chicken and their absolute favourite; day old chicks that i get from a contact who uses then for their birds of prey.
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#10 bc friend

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 06:54 AM

I have 14 and 18 year old cats. Jazzy (18), a picky eater, won't eat kidney diet (mild kidney) disease and so my vet recommended I feed her whatever she will eat in light of her age. About 3 weeks ago I started both cats on Innova maintenance (same protein level as Pro Plan canned, better ingredients) and I have seen a big difference in their coats and activity. Also both of them love the food.

#11 Rebecca, Irena Farm

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 08:09 AM

There's a really cool place that offers a powder to mix into raw meat to ensure the proper balance of nutrients for cats. Daily balance is really important in cats - they honestly do need that whole prey every time, unlike dogs who are more opportunistic. http://www.felinefuture.com/products/

When I used this, I saw my skinny 14 year old cat transform to a sleek youngster again within a couple of weeks. It was unbelievable. I had to switch off it, unfortunately, because my Siamese was allergic (we finally figured out) to eggs, which are a major ingredient. :rolleyes:

We then switched, for her benefit, to Natural Balance Venison and Green Pea. They did wonderfully on this diet too but Keke didn't do as well as on the raw/Raw/InstinctsTC.

It was actually easier than feeding my puppers raw, since it is all right there and you just mix it up and store it.

Some people think this sort of mix and serve raw is heretical, but I'm not disciplined enough to fed cats the precisely balanced variety they need.

Day old chicks WOULD be perfect. :D
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#12 Woodenlion

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 08:14 AM

Jack & Co
I just put it in a small dish by their food. My male cat is totally white and a clean freak. So I learned long ago to keep him lubed. They will usually help themselves but at this time of the year I will dose him with an extra eye dropper full. I would say about once or twice a month. I use extra virgin olive oil first cold pressing. They really like it and it is good for them.

Toni

#13 Jordi44

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 08:50 AM

Cost aside, my choice would be Iams - but I have several cats and a husband that screams about the animals (you know, every problem in the universe is because I have animals). My gang basically gets Purina Cat chow and mostly does fine. Older cats don't need a high protein diet - I worry about kidney disease in older cats - went through that once and hope to never have to again. I've known some breeders that use a mixture of foods - different brands mixed to help reduce the cost of the "better" higher cost foods and improve the quality of the lower cost foods and provides more variety. Seemed like a good idea to me. I also like Nature's Choice - seems like a good brand at a lower cost than Iams - but you'll probably have to find a pet shop that carries it - Pet Smart does around here. If your cats are happy and seem healthy, I wouldn't worry about it as long as you use a name brand - I avoid store brands and extremely cheap foods. Don't feel bad about the "raw" diet - mine do that too - unfortunately, earlier this summer, it included some of my quail that escaped - the cats were better at catching them than I was.

For hairballs, I read somewhere that canned pumpkin helps - don't know why. Some of my cats have liked it, some haven't. We have "seasonal" hairball problems - once or twice a year - and not all of them do. My female Himi is the worst.

My old cat that should have been eating kidney diet wouldn't either - and we opted the same way - anything that he'd eat at all - which ended up being rotisserie chicken that I had to feed him bite by bite.

#14 D'Elle

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 09:06 AM

CALIFORNIA NATURAL is a very good cat kibble, and that's what I feed for dry. I have done a bit of research and would recomend it. My beloved 16 year old cat, Beau, has Chronic Renal Failure, so is on a special diet, primarily needing food low in phosphorus. But one of the canned foods he likes and that is low is phos. is Trader Joe's canned food. I read the ingredients of course and it seems as good as some of the much more expensive brands. Avo Derm is also a good brand for canned, as is Petreet, and Felidae (which, unfortunately, is too high in phos. for Beau except for the Light, which he will not touch).

ONE THING I would strongly recomend to anyone who has an older (over 10) cat that they love: Please have a full blood panel done once a year. CRF can creep up on a cat, and often does, as age advances. It's a treatable disease if it doesn't progress too far before diagnosis. But you may miss the fairly subtle signs of it until your cat crashes and collapses, and then it is often fatal. I would never have known that Beau had CRF if I had not done the blood panel prior to having some dental work done on him. The blood test will just tell you where the levels are and if you need to start wtaching or treating anything. I have now been treating Beau for CRF for a year and a half, and he is doing awesomely. Without the treatment he could very easily be gone by now.
purrs from Beau, the most magnificent cat in the universe..............
and De'Elle and Jes

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Border Collies Jester and Kit; small dogs Digger and Boo, and cats Ben and Mingo

Below left to right: Kit, Jester, Boo, Digger

 

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"You gonna throw that? You gonna throw that?" --Jester
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#15 Meg's mum

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 09:56 AM

I started Sox (13 mos) out on Iams kibble becuase that was what the SPCA fed her, then moved her to Precise kibble. She really doesn't like anything else. Sox will lap up liquids...gravy, broth etc. But that's it. Beneath that fluffy exterior is a fat little belly. I have no idea how it got that way unless she's eating some of the shrews she catches. She's incredibly active and very buff.

Her shrew, mole, bird catch rate is about 1 a day on average.
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#16 Hector

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 10:22 AM

My Border Cat Skiziks is now 4 months old. Up until two weeks ago he was on Nutro Kitten Kibble. The vetrinarian told me to switch him over to adult cat food that is Urinary Balanced. He told me that Science Diet is a good brand. The vet said that there would be something on the package telling that the product is Urinary Balanced.

But when I went to PetSmart to look for the Science Diet UB, none of it said anything about Urinary Balance. I ended up buying a package of Purina One because it said Urinary Balanced/Controlled on the package. The cat likes it just fine.

#17 nes

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 11:28 AM

Try the new multicat!!

My girls get indoor hairball or kitten formula (they are just 10 months) dry food. I always look for something with tartar control too (we've had a big problem with that).

But the big thing is that I switch up their food with every bag or so. No cat or dog food is enterily complete so I by changing foods they get all their vitamins!

They also get canned food as a treat. When we had outdoor cats as a kid they got it every night so they'd come in for dinner

Nes.

#18 nes

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 11:30 AM

Originally posted by Meg's mum:
Beneath that fluffy exterior is a fat little belly. I have no idea how it got that way unless she's eating some of the shrews she catches.

If she's looking bloated instead of fat make sure you get her wormed. Shrews/voles/mice can cary tapeworm which would give her a little belly but it could also just be kitty-fat .

A worm belly is pretty distinctive because they look bloated and round instead of chubby.

Nes.

#19 Jack & Co.

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 12:29 PM

Thanks so much to all my fellow cat lovers! I knew you could help me!

D'Elle, it looks like Mao is going to have to follow in Beau's footsteps with the special food. I just talked to the vet and his blood panel showed some kidney issues so we are going to switch to Science Diet K/D dry. I guess Lucky will be eating it also since they share a bowl. Maybe she will lose some weight! Beau's success on the special food is encouraging---what brand is it?

I'm nervous about this because my previous experiences with prescription foods were not good. It does not seem to be very palatable. Maybe I'll have better luck this time.
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#20 D'Elle

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 12:53 PM

Jack & Co:

There is a lot of help on the internet about feline CRF. My first suggestion is that you join the CRF email group in Yahoo:
Feline-CRF-Support@yahoogroups.com

There are also 2 very good CRF websites, one is www.felinecrf.org; the other is www.felinecrf.com.

I strongly recomend that you go to these websites, read all about it, and that you join the group. Tons of information, help, and support will be found. I was so scared at first, but information is readily available. I give Beau a variety of foods, all low in Phosphorus, and there's a whole list on one of the websites that compares all the commercial foods rating them from lowest to highest in phosphorus. Additionally, on the email group you will find hundreds of others who are learning about this disease and treating their cats, and also experts on the topic. Beau gets sub-cutaneous fluids daily, and it's really no big deal. If you wish to email me privately I will tell you what I can, and help if I can. Many cats can live for years and have a good quality of life with proper treatment. Beau is living proof that CRF is not a death sentence. I post on the CRF Yahoo group as Zotaheya And Beau. Best of luck to you and Mao!!

D'Elle

Border Collies Jester and Kit; small dogs Digger and Boo, and cats Ben and Mingo

Below left to right: Kit, Jester, Boo, Digger

 

Mydogs12-2013Smaller.jpg
"You gonna throw that? You gonna throw that?" --Jester
"I'm grouchier than you are" --Kit
(Boing! Boing! Boing!)--Digger

"I love everyone!" -- Boo

 

 

 

 



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