Jump to content


Photo

Is there a border collie/poodle mix?


  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#1 morrbird

morrbird

    Junior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2 posts

Posted 09 July 2006 - 05:53 AM

After I lost my border collie last summer I swore I would wait a few years to find a new one. However, my 4 year old has started developing severe allergies and the doctor recommends having a dog in our home again. Is there such a thing as a border collie/poodle mix? I'm looking for no shedding (helps with allergies) and intellegence. I think those two breeds would be an excellent combo for that. Any info out there?
thanks so much,
martha

#2 Rebecca, Irena Farm

Rebecca, Irena Farm

    Together, We Can Move This Mountain

  • Registered Users
  • 6,635 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Pilot Mountain, North Carolina, USA
  • Interests:Sheep (dairy), assistance dog (SD/full access and Emotional Service Animals), general training, stockdog trialing, dock diving, lure coursing, flyball

Posted 09 July 2006 - 06:28 AM

Poodles are really smart. REally. No need to mix one with a Border collie - besides, the poodle coat isn't always inherited when you cross with a shedding breed.

I've enjoyed my Chinese crested very much also. I never find her deficient in "smarts" and I've become very used to Border collies in the last ten years or so.

Any animal in the home, will increase the level of allergens. Even hairless dogs shed dander, especially as pups. Dust mites thrive on dander. My "hairless" dog needs frequent baths which of course reduce the allergens she spreads around - she sleeps on my pillow and doesn't trouble my asthma or that of my husband at all.

If you do bring a dog into your home, you must have a game plan if the dog does aggravate your son's health. Our dogs are almost all kenneled outside at night during the peak allergy seasons, and they are never all inside at the same time. My house is still hairball city, but not in the bedrooms and never in spring and fall. We have all hardwoods and almost no window hangings. Our couches are microfiber (leather would be my first choice but $$$$!), which releases allergens from the surface and is almost impermeable.

Good luck!
Becca Shouse - Irena Farm, Semora, NC
Cord, Ted, Gus, Sam - plus Maggie, Zhi, Lynn, Jetta, Lu, Min, and Tully

Posted Image
http://irenafarm.blogspot.com/

#3 Liz P

Liz P

    optimistic realist

  • Registered Users
  • 4,467 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:somewhere inside my brain

Posted 09 July 2006 - 03:29 PM

Can you foster for a local Poodle rescue to see if your son can handle the hair/saliva/dander/dust/etc that a dog will add to your home? Rather than looking for a breed like the Poodle your best bet is to have your son play with different breeds to see how he does. I happen to be allergic to terriers, Shar Peis, some hounds, certain smooth coat BCs and a few other breeds. I only know which ones I am allergic to by spending time with them. Also, the loss of your BC may not have anything to do with the new allergies. People develop them, and grow out of them, all the time. Doctors really don't understand how they work.

Posted Image
Dangerous Dreams Farm


#4 Allie+Tess&Kipp

Allie+Tess&Kipp

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 638 posts

Posted 09 July 2006 - 06:27 PM

Borrowing or fostering or dogsitting would be a great way to see how the allergy issue unfolds! What a good idea.

I type a lot of reports for pediatrics, and there are lots of kids out there with allergies, asthma, and pets. They cope just fine. You just have to find the right dog (or iguana) for your family. :rolleyes:

My dad has very bad allergies, to nearly everything (even with regular shots for many years), and so I wash my dogs the night before we visit my parents. My dad never has a problem and the dogs are all over him. They both adore him, and he snuggles with them and pets them and he never sneezes or has any other allergic reactions he gets from other dogs.

Another concession some families with allergies do--no pets in the bedroom, or no pets upstairs, or no pets in carpeted areas or whatever works for them. Some have "no pets" clothes and "pets" clothes, too. Keeps the hair & dander where the dog is instead of spreading it everywhere around the house.

Keep in mind, too, that some doctors will work with you on ideas and some just say "no pets." That can color the situation as well.

Allie + Tess & Kipp
http://weebordercollie.com

#5 Olivia

Olivia

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 995 posts

Posted 10 July 2006 - 04:30 AM

My husband is quite allergic to dogs and we have 2 rough coated border collies that live in the house 24/7. We made a plan when we moved in together to keep his allergies under control. The dogs get baths every 2 weeks and are brushed regularly. They are not allowed in the bedroom to give DH an allergen free room. We run a hepa filter 24/7 in the living room where we all usually hang out. We do have carpet but it is vaccumed regularly with a vaccum that has a hepa filter in it.

So far, almost 4 years later, all is well. If anything DH's allergies have gotten significantly better! I think his body is getting desensitized to the dog dander. Initally his hands would swell up and he would start sneezing if he sat on the floor with the dogs and petted them too long. Now he goofs around with them on the floor at least once a week and is fine; only having problems if it is near their bath time.

We have noticed that there are certain dogs, not necessarily breeds as some are border collies, that he can't be around. When we go to our local rescue's monthly meet and greet to volunteer he will occassionally run into a dog that he just can't pet or be around. Same at agility events or with friend's dogs.

I think adding a dog to your household is a great idea. Foster for a local rescue to help find the perfect dog for you. Make a plan and stick to it. I think that today's children live in a very sterile world, encouraged by the media and doctors. Don't let them get dirty, play outside, etc. I was raised with horses, cats, outside play, etc. I was allergy tested at 6 years old and went into anaphalactic shock from the testing as I was so allergic to everything! The doctor said that I would need to be raised in the house, with windows painted shut, no pets, and that I would always be severely allergic to the world. I kept riding horses and my parents never got rid of our pets. We managed my allergies with medication when needed; now, at age 26, I sleep with the windows open and function normally. I occassionally get sniffly and wheezy but I take meds that day and continue with my life.

Olivia

#6 Jack & Co.

Jack & Co.

    Mayberry, NC

  • Registered Users
  • 2,239 posts
  • Location:North Carolina

Posted 10 July 2006 - 04:42 AM

I am fortunate that no one in my family has allergies, but I do have the big dog hairballs rolling around my tile and hardwood floors. I end up dragging the vacuum out daily and I'm tired of doing that. My Swiffer does a good job, but I wondered if anyone has a better suggestion that doesn't require me to wrestle the vacuum out of the closet everyday.....maybe every other day? We brush Jack but it doesn't seem to make much difference. I would blame my two cats if I could but they can't be bothered to come in the house in the summer since there are rodents scampering about the yard.
To err is human, to forgive, canine.

#7 Rebecca, Irena Farm

Rebecca, Irena Farm

    Together, We Can Move This Mountain

  • Registered Users
  • 6,635 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Pilot Mountain, North Carolina, USA
  • Interests:Sheep (dairy), assistance dog (SD/full access and Emotional Service Animals), general training, stockdog trialing, dock diving, lure coursing, flyball

Posted 10 July 2006 - 04:54 AM

I'm looking at one of those stick vacs. My mom suggested it because she knows me well. I want the cordless type - the idea of also being able to take it out to clean the car, rocks.
Becca Shouse - Irena Farm, Semora, NC
Cord, Ted, Gus, Sam - plus Maggie, Zhi, Lynn, Jetta, Lu, Min, and Tully

Posted Image
http://irenafarm.blogspot.com/

#8 Pipedream Farm

Pipedream Farm

    The Geek & The Zoo Keeper

  • Registered Users
  • 3,733 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Middletown, MD

Posted 10 July 2006 - 05:01 AM

FYI

Humans are allergic to proteins that are produced in glands in the dog's mouth and by the tongue. These proteins end up on the skin and are released into the environment on the dead skin (dander). Unless shedding of fur is directly tied to increased shedding of dead skin; it should make no difference if the dog sheds or not. What is more important is the health of the skin (i.e. skin diseases).

Mark
Mark & Renee
Gyp, Peg, Bette, Nell, BJ, Tally, & Eve

#9 SoloRiver

SoloRiver

    Canis sapiens

  • Registered Users
  • 4,701 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Eugene, OR
  • Interests:working sheepdogs, agility, behavior and training, rescue

Posted 10 July 2006 - 08:10 AM

I sincerely hope no one is producing Border Collie/Poodle mixes on purpose. There are enough "designer" poo mixes running around, being irresponsibly bred, misrepresented by their sellers, and ending up in inappropriate homes.

If you would like another Border Collie I would look at adopting a slick coated adult from a responsible rescue that is willing to work with you, planning on certain precautions (like not having the dog sleep in the kid's room), bathing the dog regularly, and other things mentioned above. There's also a product called Allerpet-D (D is for "dog," they also make a C for cats) you can apply to the dog's coat to decrease allergens. I used to use the C version for my cat (I am very allergic to cats) and it made a big difference for me.
Melanie, Solo the Red, Superfly, and Jett Girl
My homepage
My photos on Flickr
Canine Behavioral Genetics Project

#10 MaggieDog

MaggieDog

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,639 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:North Carolina
  • Interests:dogs (behavior, training, you name it), hiking/the outdoors, reading, rollerblading

Posted 10 July 2006 - 01:35 PM

IME poodles are very different from BCs - I love my girl and other herding breeds I've worked with and fostered, but the one poodle mix (a goldendoodle to be precise) I fostered drove both myself and my dog absolutely nuts - I wanted to scream and pull out hair and my BC wanted to throttle his butt because he was completely oblivious to personal space, boundaries, and warnings, both human and canine. He was returned to the kennel w/in 3 weeks instead of the 8 weeks we had been planning on.

I can't imagine having one full time, esp mixed with a BC!!!! A big no thanks there.
Erin
Ziva: 4 yo Corgi mix, agility dog!
Kestrel: 2 yo Cattle Dog (mix?), schutzhund and agility dog in training
Aerten: Malinois puppy, schutzhund dog in training

Maggie Mae, always in our hearts <3


Posted Image

"To me, every hour of the light and dark is a miracle. Every cubic inch of space is a miracle." - Walt Whitman

#11 2 Devils

2 Devils

    5 Devils and counting

  • Registered Users
  • 2,393 posts

Posted 10 July 2006 - 02:51 PM

Mark - the whole saliva thing has made something make sense. A little boy I knew (he was 1-2 years at the time) would break out if a dog licked him. We knew the saliva, per se, was the cause but never realized that is what is actually the main cause of allergies to dogs.

I am allergic to many, many things including dogs. Dogs are one of my worse allergies. I have 4 dogs. I am desensitized to my dogs most of the time. My problems occur when at places that have many dogs or am outside a lot and then around my dogs.

A poodle really is not hypo-allergenic just like they are techically not non-shedding. They do shed but the hair twists into the curls instead of dropping to the floor but it does that too. I have a poodle and I am allergic to him too.

I would do as others suggest and talk to a rescue and get a smooth hair bc or other breed and ask if you can try one out on a temporary basis. I would also take the precautions folks suggested. I wish I followed the precautions but I don't and currently don't need to but may have to one day.
Kim
Warrenton, VA
Posted Image

#12 Liz P

Liz P

    optimistic realist

  • Registered Users
  • 4,467 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:somewhere inside my brain

Posted 10 July 2006 - 03:07 PM

Careful now, whether they should get a smooth coat or rough coat depends on the type of allergies the kid has! Many people I know are allergic to slick coated dogs but not rough coats (and others are allergice only to rough coats). Before rushing out and getting a dog the kid needs to be exposed to them to see if that particular type will cause a reaction.

Posted Image
Dangerous Dreams Farm


#13 Pipedream Farm

Pipedream Farm

    The Geek & The Zoo Keeper

  • Registered Users
  • 3,733 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Middletown, MD

Posted 11 July 2006 - 12:55 AM

People are not allergic to the breed of dog, type of coat (shedding or non), length of coat, color of coat, etc.; they are allergic to proteins produced in the mouths of dogs and released on dander (dead skin). How much of these proteins (I believe 3) are produced and how much dander is produced by each individual dog will effect how each allergic person reacts to that individual dog.

BTW I am allergic to dogs and this information I am providing was obtained reading scientific studies and reiterated by my allergist.

Mark
Mark & Renee
Gyp, Peg, Bette, Nell, BJ, Tally, & Eve

#14 Daviid

Daviid

    Member

  • Registered Users
  • 53 posts

Posted 11 July 2006 - 01:51 AM

I very allergic to smooth coated dogs. I've read those scientific studies to that tell me it's not the coat but saliva...all I know is I'm a mess around short coated dogs. I use to teach obedience classes for 15 years and the short coated dogs really did a number on me. We just kept my mother-in-laws bull terrier for a week, he was a hoot of a dog, every time I'd play and wrestle with him, my allergies acted up. No problems with my 3 coated border collies, or other coated dogs?

All I know is my nose knows, I don't always have stock in scientific studies..
David

#15 Pipedream Farm

Pipedream Farm

    The Geek & The Zoo Keeper

  • Registered Users
  • 3,733 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Middletown, MD

Posted 11 July 2006 - 02:41 AM

Correlations do not guarantee a link.

For example:

The Earth's axis is drifting towards Alaska
Gas prices are going up
Therefore the shift in the earth's axis is causing the rise in gas prices

I am allergic to dogs
I have had worse reactions to the short-coated dogs than the rough-coated dogs I have met
Therefore I am more allergic to short-coated dogs

This is almost accurate. In reality it should read I am more allergic to the short-coated dogs I have met.

There is no data on the relative protein productions or rates of skin sloughing for the dogs you have met.

Remember, allergins are molecules (i.e. proteins) not coat lengths.

Mark
Mark & Renee
Gyp, Peg, Bette, Nell, BJ, Tally, & Eve

#16 2 Devils

2 Devils

    5 Devils and counting

  • Registered Users
  • 2,393 posts

Posted 11 July 2006 - 03:09 AM

I just think short-coated dogs are easier to wipe down when they have been outside especially during high pollen season where as with longer coated dogs the pollen can get further into the fur and harder to remove without a good brushing or bath.

I know I am worse about doing the above though with my short-coated dogs. In the back of my mind I think that there is no need since their fur is not really collecting the pollen when in truth I know it is. I have a feeling that a lot folks are the same way. They may be better about "grooming" the long-coated dogs, I know I am... hence why I have problems with my dogs at times. I am not the best about "grooming" any of them even though I am severely allergic to them and pollen...

Does that make sense?
Kim
Warrenton, VA
Posted Image

#17 SoloRiver

SoloRiver

    Canis sapiens

  • Registered Users
  • 4,701 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Eugene, OR
  • Interests:working sheepdogs, agility, behavior and training, rescue

Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:06 AM

I think a smooth coat may be preferable because smooths are much easier to bathe, wipe down, and otherwise and keep clean. It takes me about two seconds to bathe Fly, who is sort of medium (her hair is short but thick -- kind of like a Lab's -- not slick). Bathing Solo is an ordeal because he has such a heavy coat.

Dirt just falls off of both of them (Border Collies are made of Teflon, I think), but Solo's coat definitely holds more stuff than Fly's and I imagine it would also hold more dander.
Melanie, Solo the Red, Superfly, and Jett Girl
My homepage
My photos on Flickr
Canine Behavioral Genetics Project

#18 nancy in AZ

nancy in AZ

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 1,609 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:prescott, AZ

Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:56 AM

Mark-as one who has suffered from a multitude of allergies my whole life,I just have to say, I so appreciate your posts. They are a breath of fresh air (so to speak).

Now would can you explain why allergy shots work for some and not others, and in particular, why some allergists insist on treating those for whom they don't work with them regardless?
Posted Image

#19 Pipedream Farm

Pipedream Farm

    The Geek & The Zoo Keeper

  • Registered Users
  • 3,733 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Middletown, MD

Posted 11 July 2006 - 09:20 AM

Nancy,

As an allergy suffer and shot endurer; how does one know if the treatment is working? You and I know that there are good allergy days and bad ones; meaning there are days when our exposure is higher than others. So unless the shots are 100% effective (they totally eliminate our allergic reactions) how do you know they are working? If we have less reaction, is it because the shots are helping or is it because we had less exposure?

Mark (hopefully waiting for 100% relief)
Mark & Renee
Gyp, Peg, Bette, Nell, BJ, Tally, & Eve

#20 2 Devils

2 Devils

    5 Devils and counting

  • Registered Users
  • 2,393 posts

Posted 11 July 2006 - 11:08 AM

I tried allergy shots for 8 months and finally said enough. I was actually feeling worse and having allergy attacks more often so for me, I decided it was not worth it but I do think I gave it a chance. My doctor agreed allergy shots were not for me but he did try to tell me to stick with it another couple months. I take allergy meds but my system becomes immune to them in time so I realy hope they come up with a new med soon...

I also love Mark's posts.

Melanie - you explained the short coat thing better than I did.
Kim
Warrenton, VA
Posted Image


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Copyright: All posts and images on this site are protected by copyright, and may not be reproduced or distributed in any way without permission. Banner photo courtesy of Denise Wall, 2009 CDWall. For further information, contact info@bordercollie.org.