Jump to content


Photo

Herding Instinct Test- Roanoke VA


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 ssloan

ssloan

    Junior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Buchanan, VA

Posted 21 February 2017 - 04:09 PM

I'm looking to have my two girls instinct tested (no certificate needed), but I'm trying to find someone closer to me. The closest people I've found are still about 2-3 hours from me. I live between Roanoke and Lexington VA. I'm not opposed to driving, but I was hoping for someone just a bit closer.



#2 GentleLake

GentleLake

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 5,767 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 22 February 2017 - 11:35 AM

What are you looking to determine? And to what end?

 

Many years ago (33?) I'd taken my working female to a large expo where the were offering eye exams by a Cornell canine ophthalmologist (along with educational presentations, obedience match trials, breed clubs and lots of vendors, etc.). There was an ACK "herding instinct" test being offered with certificates awarded to the dogs who "passed." I watched for a while, feeling pretty sorry for them because they were getting such poor results. Few of the dogs engaged in any way with the ducks; some didn't even seem aware of their presence. Yet lots of instinct certificates were awarded to any dog who even so much as glanced at the ducks. One adolescent bearded collie thought the ducks were mobile toys and he chased and harried them no end. The evaluators gushed over his "instinct"!

 

By this time I thought I'd enter Kate, not that her instinct needed to be tested, but maybe they could see a little demonstration. (Keep in mind at this stage I was still pretty green, Kate wasn't the best dog ever, and she'd never worked ducks. Still, I was confident she could offer a reasonable showing, and certainly much better than I'd seen.) I went up to the sign in table. The person doing sign-ups looked at me, looked down at my dog, looked up at me again and turned her back on me and walked away without saying a word!

 

The point of this tale, if it's not apparent -- don't bother with ACK herding instinct tests. They're utterly useless.


"People in your life always come and go all the time; the dogs are always there for me. Always." ~Samantha Valle


#3 Bicoastal

Bicoastal

    Junior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 16 posts

Posted 22 February 2017 - 01:09 PM

I know someone near Winchester (PM me) and there is Keepstone Farm in Berryville.



#4 Donald McCaig

Donald McCaig

    Geezer

  • Registered Users
  • 2,076 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Highland County Virginia

Posted 23 February 2017 - 09:53 AM

Dear Ms. Sloan,

Nobody competent offers a "herding instinct" test because (a) it's meaningless and (B) a dog may refuse to work one day and be desperate to work the next time it goes out  If, on the other hand, you want to learn if your Border Collie (age 6 months or older) might be trainable for sheepwork, David Clark outside Lexington is competent, trains and trials at the open level. Contact me privately for his email.

 

Donald McCaig



#5 Sue R

Sue R

    Bark less, wag more

  • Registered Users
  • 12,905 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Bruceton Mills WV
  • Interests:Stockdogs, horses, chocolate

Posted 25 February 2017 - 05:43 AM

What Donald said.
Sue Rayburn - Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult, but not the brightest firefly in the jar.

Celt, Megan, and Dan

"When the chips are down, watch where you step."

"The happiest people don't necessarily have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything." - author unknown

#6 ssloan

ssloan

    Junior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Buchanan, VA

Posted 28 February 2017 - 12:49 AM

Thank you for you replies, and I'm sorry for taking so long in responding. I should have better explained what I was looking for. 

 

I was looking to have my dogs tested to see if they have the drive/ability to move sheep. I'm completely new to herding, so I thought that's what an instinct test was. I want to make sure they can work sheep before we build fencing, purchase sheep, etc. 

 

I know both myself and my pups will have to learn a lot first, so the sheep would be in the pretty distant future. I'm just looking to take the first step in learning, with having a few sheep as the end goal.



#7 denice

denice

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 450 posts

Posted 28 February 2017 - 12:13 PM

The problem is a one time exposure to sheep or even months of training/lessons may not be an accurate assessment of what the dog is capable of.  So much depends on other factors  - your relationship with the dog, the training method, the group of sheep, the age of the dog and its disposition...

 

If these pups came from working parents and if those parents have produced working pups then odds are they will have instinct to work stock.  IF that instinct and style of working suits you as a novice and your sheep in an entire new can of worms.  The breeder should be able to assist you.

 

I would start visiting trainers to see their dogs work and see how they train.  If that suits you make regular visits and see where it goes.  Go to a few clinics, watch different dogs and trainers. No One can tell with a pup only seen once on sheep.

 

I think it comes down to Are the sheep for you OR are they for the dog?  If you want sheep get them, learn about them and enjoy them then get a dog to help with them.  If the sheep are for the dog - invest a year or two in lessons then look at getting sheep.



#8 Sue R

Sue R

    Bark less, wag more

  • Registered Users
  • 12,905 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Bruceton Mills WV
  • Interests:Stockdogs, horses, chocolate

Posted 28 February 2017 - 12:36 PM

Well said, Denice. 


Sue Rayburn - Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult, but not the brightest firefly in the jar.

Celt, Megan, and Dan

"When the chips are down, watch where you step."

"The happiest people don't necessarily have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything." - author unknown

#9 ssloan

ssloan

    Junior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Buchanan, VA

Posted 02 March 2017 - 12:25 AM

Denice, basically everything you suggested is what I was planning on doing. I know one exposure wouldn't be enough to learn much of anything, but that's all I would be able to manage if I was taking a six hour round trip for just a bit of learning. If I can find someone closer to me, I will take full advantage of that. 

 

I've been to a few trials, spoken to some people who use their dogs to move sheep about how to get started, and have a few books on training. Like I mentioned, sheep would be in the distant future, probably in three to five years and I would only get about 4-5 sheep total. 

 

It's frustrating because I'm limited in who I can go to for help and what workshops I can attend. So, basically, I'm looking for someone closer to me that can help me. A test that would help me see if my girls had the drive was where I was intending to start my journey with sheep herding, and I was resigned to having to learn most everything on my own and without much outside help.



#10 gcv-border

gcv-border

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 4,560 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:SW Virginia

Posted 05 March 2017 - 04:40 PM

Sarah,

Sent you a PM.


Jovi

"Folks will know how large your soul is by the way you treat a dog."  Charles F. Duran



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Copyright: All posts and images on this site are protected by copyright, and may not be reproduced or distributed in any way without permission. Banner photo courtesy of Denise Wall, 2009 CDWall. For further information, contact info@bordercollie.org.