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Observations on dogs with early hearing loss


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#21 Mark Billadeau

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Posted 15 June 2016 - 04:41 AM

I think you may not have understood what I meant. There may be a greater loss in hearing the higher pitches (higher sound frequencies) than the lower tones which means some sounds you make are heard better than others. This will make it seem that some commands need to be louder than others to get the same response from the partially deaf dog.
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#22 Maja

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Posted 15 June 2016 - 04:48 AM

Yes, it definitely sounds likely.


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23


#23 Maja

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 10:32 AM

A quick question.  Did your dogs at any point shake their head or cocked their head frequently?  


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23


#24 Mark Billadeau

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 10:43 AM

No
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#25 Maja

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 11:30 AM

Thank you. I took her to the vet but he said her ears are "beautiful".


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23


#26 Sue R

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 12:02 PM

I never observed this with Megan. She has never been a head-cocker and her posture and body language after losing her hearing was the same as before.

 

Always a bit skittish about sudden movements (especially hand movements), she is even more so about things that startle her - like walking up behind her and touching her to get her attention, or touching her when she is asleep to wake her up. I think that is simply because she is absolutely unaware I am there when I touch her whereas before, when she could hear, she would be aware to some degree or another of my approach, even when asleep. Of course, she sleeps pretty soundly now that she's about to turn 14! 


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#27 Maja

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 12:39 PM

Bonnie was never jumpy (her sister is a certified therapy dog, which reflects how laid back they all are), but she sleeps very hard, and her hearing problem is becoming more  and more pronounced.

 

Back in Feb., when the the third vet finally found deep in her ear some gunky black stuff, she would shake her head often and not just cock it but turn it very strongly to one side.  It went away, we got the ear cleaned and now she is starting to do that again.  She does the normal cocking when puzzled at something, but also she just turns her head, twists kind of.


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23


#28 Sue R

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 01:28 PM

Some dogs have different habits, like cocking their head or not. 

 

Could she possibly have more of that "gunk" building up again? 


Sue Rayburn - Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult, but not the brightest firefly in the jar.

Celt, Megan, and Dan

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#29 Maja

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 01:48 AM

It does not seem so, the vet checked her very thoroughly with the ear-thingy yesterday,and said both ear were very clean. I guess, i will have save up and make a trek to the far-away Warsaw clinic. 


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23


#30 Maja

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 09:58 AM

There is this wise saying "keep your eye on the ball".  But did you know that dogs also keep their ear on the ball?  :)  I didn't.

 

You know how dogs anticipate where the ball is flying and try to get ahead of it to catch it.  Well, believe it or not, you also need ears for that.  Bonnie keeps losing track of the ball I throw her.  And of course she can't hear it falling so she has no idea where it is.  I had to change to throwing a flat curve so that she chases it a every stage.

 

https://www.facebook...68927161&type=3


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23


#31 Maja

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 09:11 AM

I must say Bonnie is not taking the situation in her stride as I would have liked her to, for her sake.  The clever little munchkin knows "dummy" tasks from real work, and she is frustrated that she is not the go-to dog anymore.  It is also frustrating for me because Darine just doesn't quite cut quite it in harder tasks.  And the third border collie is 11 yo and her eyesight is failing. 

 

And I find it a little difficult to make myself work with Bonnie, because it is kind of heart-breaking knowing what she was, and what she is now.  But we plod along. And sometimes, like in the video, everything goes fine and everybody is happy.


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23


#32 Sue R

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 10:00 AM

:(
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#33 Liz P

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 08:57 PM

I did end up placing my EOD affected dog in a pet home.  I tried to use him for work after he went deaf, but after some dangerous near misses I stopped.  Of course, this made him super frustrated when I took the other dogs out to work.  He started to try to break out of the house to join us, so I had to crate him.  Then he started to bloody his mouth and break his teeth on the crate door if I took another dog out to work.  His new owner loves him to death.  They travel all over the USA together and I get reports about how well he is doing.  I know he is happy, but I cried for a long time after he left.  Knowing it's for the best doesn't make the decision any easier.

 

PS, what kind of sheep are those?  They are fast!



#34 Maja

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 01:45 AM

Liz,

It's so good you found a good solution for your dog, in spite of its being a very tough one for you.  

 

Bonnie was born in our home and she would just whither away if we got separated.  She never leaves my side on her own.  I haven't developed a bond like that with any other dog, which was partly why it had been so great to work with her - she really tuned in to what I wanted of her, often tweaking my commands to suit the situation better and accomplish what was needed.  I had tried to teach her not just commands but to understand the task, and it worked out great. She always was the one to save my hide at trials :)

 

When I go to work with another dog, she suffers, but she does not go crazy since that was something I had been getting her used to since she was a pup, and with many dogs coming to train she's had a lot of practice in self control. 

 

I also bought her a doggie ring, because she often missed where the ball  went when I would throw it, but I roll the ring and so we play with it together. So we get by.

 

 

The sheep are called Skudde, it's an old Prussian breed, now part genetic protection program in Germany.  Because Bonnie didn't stop before the lift it may give the impression that she rushed them, but it is not so. Skuddes are very fast and eager to use their speed.  They are hardy and good mothers.  When I first got them and before they got dogged at all, I invited  some more advanced people to to try out with them.  Bonnie had to look for them in the forest afterwards :) . Thank goodness that was still when her hearing was not too bad, and the not-so-easy-to-impress  sheepdog people were duly impressed.


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23


#35 Smalahundur

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 04:41 AM

A pity how things turned out for Bonnie, especially because of your great working relationship.

How old is Darinka by now? My wife has been giving me some criticism about being too hard on a second (or third) dog because of comparing them to that nice first dog one spend a lot of time with building a working relationship with. I think she has a point....

Yeah, those skuddes are nice sheep. Having to deal exclusively with Icelandic sheep I sometimes smile at posts on sites like this or Facebook groups where people ask what kind of sheep they should buy to best suit the needs of their particular dogs....;)
You don't have your ouessants anymore? Those were cute.

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#36 Maja

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 05:39 AM


How old is Darinka by now? My wife has been giving me some criticism about being too hard on a second (or third) dog because of comparing them to that nice first dog one spend a lot of time with building a working relationship with. I think she has a point....

Yeah, those skuddes are nice sheep. Having to deal exclusively with Icelandic sheep I sometimes smile at posts on sites like this or Facebook groups where people ask what kind of sheep they should buy to best suit the needs of their particular dogs.... ;)
You don't have your ouessants anymore? Those were cute.

 

My personal favorites were Cameroonians - super fast but also respond well to a good dog and stand up to a not so good dog. They really give excellent education to a dog in training, and they are not easy :) . Skuddes rarely face a dog when it is warranted, which I am not happy about, but they are good teachers in other respects.

 

No, no more ouessants. Too many c-sections and they had this sort of "dumb" stubbornness. I like a strong sheep, but I don't like a dumb one.

 

Darinka is four and a half.  Your wife is certainly right (though  Bonnie was my second BC actually). But this thought has always been with me, and I do know Darine got a bit of a raw deal: first, her pedigree is excellent in comparison to Bonnie's, second, Bonnie was a really good dog, third, the time when I needed to rely on Darinka came too early, because of Bonnie's EAOD. But when all is said about the handler shortcomings, Darine was still so very hard to train (and I do have a comparison, since other dogs come to me to learn too), and when you have a difficult job to do and you actually need to rely on your dog, Darine often fails to take the command correctly. 

 

So I have one dog that hears but doesn't listen and other that listens but can't hear :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

[ And I really appreciate that Darine wants to do right, she just way overthinks everything and at critical moments when the speed and correctness of execution matters, this is disastrous.]


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23


#37 Smalahundur

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 07:19 AM

You should visit, in my experiece icelandic sheep smell weakness in a dog a mile off. And they will exploit that weakness with no mercy. Armed and dangerous. The main reason that people here value toughness in a dog, and a good grip.
Had a good laugh from that "Hearing dog that doesn't listen" remark :)
Do I remember correctly that you posted a vid once with a crazy hair ram that tried to fell a tree by knocking it several times? One of your camaroons?

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#38 Maja

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 08:14 AM

Yes, that was Ramses! :)   He did the same thing on reinforced concrete enclosure.  The length some males go to to impress the females :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

But he was a grand ram!  One of few I've seen that would bodygurad his ewes.


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23


#39 Liz P

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 02:12 PM

I owned mine since birth as well and we were very close.  I never, ever imagined he would be leaving my home.  Seeing him go made me feel physically sick.  A week after his new owner took him, a rescue volunteer saw them together.  She said they were deeply bonded and looked as if they had been best friends for many years.  That made me feel a lot better, but I didn't stop missing him for a long time.  I still do really.  It was the right choice though.

 

I didn't mean to imply she made the sheep run.  I could see how they took off like rockets as soon as they saw a dog coming.  They reminded me of Black Belly Barbados sheep for that reason.  I love trying out different types of stock with my dogs and seeing how they handle themselves.  I think those experiences make for a more well rounded working partner.

 

Anyway, this disease sure is a heartbreaker.  I hope the DNA test is finalized soon.  Before Frankie's dam died I had collected several DNA samples and saved them.  Frankie's new owner has been kind enough to send in samples to various studies as well. 



#40 Maja

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 02:21 AM

I owned mine since birth as well and we were very close. ...  It was the right choice though.

 

I do believe it was the right choice, and  I think  I understand what you've been through.

 

 

I didn't mean to imply she made the sheep run.

It wasn't directed at you :) . I made the comment for casual watchers  who may think she did.


"Be sure you know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds" - Prov. 27-23



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