Jump to content


Photo

Travel Safety


  • Please log in to reply
47 replies to this topic

#1 ShesMaggie

ShesMaggie

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 207 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Texas

Posted 14 June 2012 - 05:19 PM

Reading about Elicia Calhoun's horrible traffic accident has made me think about the safest way of traveling with Maggie. Currently, she wears a seat belt harness and rides in the back seat of the SUV. She rides well and generally sleeps the entire time.

Until this point we have just been going around town locally, but now we are taking lessons which requires us to travel on the freeway a longer distance and will at some point travel to trials...so I'm wondering what is best.

I carry a wire crate in the back of the SUV for when we get to where we are going but doesn't seem to me that it would be very sturdy in the event of a crash and I don't like that it is in the back if we were rear ended.

I did find this that I am considering which looks more sturdy:
http://www.dogtraile...33/Default.aspx
Does anyone have one of these? What about dog trailers?

I know many of you travel all over the country with your dogs so I was hoping to benefit from your experience.
My faithful friends:
Reno (R.I.P) 15 years
Spur 12 years
Maggie 2 years

#2 NCStarkey

NCStarkey

    Just a few shovelfuls short of a full load

  • Registered Users
  • 665 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Mt. Airy, Maryland
  • Interests:Border Collies, Sheepdog Trials, and Bluefaced Leicester sheep

Posted 14 June 2012 - 06:05 PM

Hi "ShesMaggie",

Thank you for starting this thread, as it is truly important for those of us who travel with our dogs.

My dogs are always crated when we travel, but I have used a seat belt / harness restraint system successfully in the past. I currently have a full size van, and my dogs' crates are securely installed in it. In addition to the dogs being crated, instructions regarding the care of my dogs in an emergency is also attached.

Here is an article that was published years ago, but it is just as important today.

Travel Emergency Letter by Nancy Cox Starkey

As many of us travel great distances with our dogs in our vehicles, here's something that you might want to keep in mind. Have you ever stopped to think what might happen if you were involved in an accident in which you were injured (or even killed) and not able to communicate your wishes regarding your dogs? I now carry the following letter, along with photos and medical records for each dog, in my vehicle at all times.


In Case of an Accident

In the event that I, (your name here) , am incapacitated and unable to make my wishes known regarding my dogs, please honor the following requests:

My (husband, mother, wife, friend, etc.), (name of person), is to be contacted as soon as possible a (phone numbers). If he/she can not be reached, please contact my (a different relative or friend),(name of person) at (phone numbers).

If the dogs are not injured, they are to be cared for by the nearest reputable boarding kennel, and kept in the best possible manner, until arrangements can be made to get them home.

If the dogs are injured, they are to be cared for by the nearest reputable veterinarian. Additionally, I request that my veterinarian, Dr. (name of your veterinarian), be contacted regarding decisions about the dogs' care and treatment. Dr. (name of your veterinarian) can be contacted 24 hours a day at the (name of clinic) Veterinary Hospital at (phone numbers). If any dog is injured beyond all hope of recovery, that dog is to be humanely euthanized by a veterinarian.

Photographs and descriptions of the dogs which usually accompany me are attached, as are their health and vaccination records. These dogs are tattooed on their (location of tattoo) with my social security number and are micro-chipped and registered with (name of microchip registry).

The welfare of these dogs is my primary consideration, and all expenses for the dogs care are guaranteed to be paid.

* * end of letter * *

Consider keeping a letter such as this (with any additional instructions you may have) in your vehicle, somewhere where it would be easily located by emergency personnel (mine is in a clearly labeled zippered pouch and attached to their crates). It could ensure the proper treatment of your dogs in case of an accident. The alternatives are not pleasant: if uninjured, your dogs could be taken to a local pound, and if injured, your dogs could be "put out of their misery" by a well-meaning but uninformed trooper. And, hopefully, all of us further ensure our dogs safety by keeping them restrained at all times while traveling (in their crates or in a seat belt system). A few simple precautions could make a big difference in an emergency situation.

Revised and Reprinted with permission of Ethel B. Conrad (deceased), USBCC president emeritus


Regards,
nancy
"He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog.
You are his life, his love, his leader.
He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart.
You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion."
Author Unknown

Posted Image

Nancy Cox Starkey
Trial & Error Acres
Mt. Airy, Maryland
NCStarkey@aol.com
www.TrialandErrorAcres.com
www.TrialandErrorAcres.blogspot.com

#3 Liz P

Liz P

    optimistic realist

  • Registered Users
  • 4,573 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:somewhere inside my brain

Posted 14 June 2012 - 06:34 PM

These don't cost as much and seem more versatile.

Posted Image
Dangerous Dreams Farm


#4 Pam Wolf

Pam Wolf

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 1,441 posts

Posted 14 June 2012 - 07:12 PM

I have a 6 hole trailer and I LOVE traveling with it. The dogs seem to enjoy riding in it and find it comfortable when we arrive. There is always the worry about an accident no matter what you haul dogs in. Some things I looked for when we got the trailer was temperature features. Is there enough ventilation for the dogs when it is hot. Cold isn't as big a problem and I supply the dogs with straw for travel and just add more when it is cold, plus several dogs in the trailer warm it nicely when parked. I also wanted partially slotted dividers for air circulation, yet reducing the dog's ability to stare at each other and bark alot. Good locks!, doors that keep stray hands out of the dog boxes yet allows good ventilation.

Some of those dog boxes are quite nice Liz, wonder if one could hold Phel during a storm
I'd rather be a shepherd than a sheepdogger

#5 rushdoggie

rushdoggie

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,150 posts
  • Location:Vancouver, WA

Posted 14 June 2012 - 07:17 PM

Saw this posted on FB, thought it was a good idea:

Posted Image

f84d543e-e476-430d-b76a-da3c85c28501_zps

 

Training is a journey, not a destination. If you think you’ve arrived, you’ve already missed out.
Denise Fenzi


#6 gcv-border

gcv-border

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,796 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:SW Virginia

Posted 14 June 2012 - 08:12 PM

Here is another website for safe crates. http://safedog.co.uk/ These crates are from Britain.

They are actually crash-tested - and very cool looking. And I thought that they were expensive until I saw the Jones trailer site.

Jovi

Jovi

"Folks will know how large your soul is by the way you treat a dog."  Charles F. Duran


#7 Liz P

Liz P

    optimistic realist

  • Registered Users
  • 4,573 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:somewhere inside my brain

Posted 14 June 2012 - 08:35 PM

Good idea rushdoggie, but in today's culture I would be worried about someone freaking out and thinking that might be a pipe bomb.

I have trailer envy and have long been plotting to steal Pam's. It really is the nicest dog trailer I've ever seen. :P

Jovi, I have been looking for that exact type of crate for years, but I couldn't afford them!

Posted Image
Dangerous Dreams Farm


#8 gcv-border

gcv-border

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,796 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:SW Virginia

Posted 14 June 2012 - 09:05 PM

Jovi, I have been looking for that exact type of crate for years, but I couldn't afford them!


Liz,
I have been looking for that crate too - without realizing what I wanted until I saw it. :D I can't afford one either.
Jovi

Jovi

"Folks will know how large your soul is by the way you treat a dog."  Charles F. Duran


#9 ShesMaggie

ShesMaggie

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 207 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Texas

Posted 14 June 2012 - 11:32 PM

Those are nice but the Tahoe is not listed as one of the vehicles they fit, maybe they have an European equivalent. I like Jones because they are local and if I'm going to spend that kind of money I want to go see it and touch it first. I also like the underneath storage.

I dream of a fancy dog trailer but with only two dogs, I can't really justify it.

Maybe some day...

I like the idea of having the emergency information and am going to print one out this weekend.
My faithful friends:
Reno (R.I.P) 15 years
Spur 12 years
Maggie 2 years

#10 rushdoggie

rushdoggie

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,150 posts
  • Location:Vancouver, WA

Posted 15 June 2012 - 12:45 AM

Good idea rushdoggie, but in today's culture I would be worried about someone freaking out and thinking that might be a pipe bomb.


:) I guess someone might! I think I might risk it anyways and just ensure it says "please open to find emergency information"

f84d543e-e476-430d-b76a-da3c85c28501_zps

 

Training is a journey, not a destination. If you think you’ve arrived, you’ve already missed out.
Denise Fenzi


#11 Donald McCaig

Donald McCaig

    Geezer

  • Registered Users
  • 1,307 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Highland County Virginia

Posted 15 June 2012 - 05:39 AM

Dear Doggers,

Preferences differ and we all worry. My dogs do 20k annually in marchioro airline crates in the wayback of a magnificent, venerable (old) station wagon and have survived two crashes (one nearly totaled the car) w/o injury. One day I'm going to stop fooling with these damn dogs and learn to drive.

I won't recommend my method unless you are rock star cool, but I do believe that most people (and every beginner) choose(s) kennels they'd like to rest in rather than one that suits a dog. Many are way too big. Think DEN. My standard kennels are 27x19x20 and my 45 lb dogs have traveled contentedly for 23 hours with pee stops every six hours

I don't do it but I've known big hats who put two dogs in one trailer compartment for long travel.

I also think dogs are more content in the more denlike airline crates than wire cages

Donald McCaig

#12 alligande

alligande

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 1,310 posts

Posted 15 June 2012 - 06:14 AM

The crates in the link I think are the same Swedish ones that Cleanrun are now importing.

#13 WildFlower

WildFlower

    Sheep dog handler in training.

  • Registered Users
  • 1,776 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:SE Wisconsin
  • Interests:Dogs, stock work, chickens, gardening, photography

Posted 15 June 2012 - 07:27 AM

I have 2 wire crates in the back of my hatchback. The crates are securely anchored down with tow straps. The crates actually ride more in the center of the car (by rear doors) and there is about a foot of space from the back crate to the hatch door. Each crate has a rubber backed mat in it so my dogs don't slide. I purchased my car when I only had two dogs but have since acquired (an unplanned) third. :P So Daisy and Devon share a "large" crate and Teak rides solo in a "medium". Not ideal but it works. I travel regularly to lessons, clinics, and trials. I have the emergency letter Nancy posted above zip tied to each crate in a clear pouch with a picture of each dog, their vet records, and microchip #s.I also have an extra copy in the glove box.

I have to agree with the others that my dogs seem to prefer to ride in their crates over riding loose.

Vicki

Border Collies: Daisy, Devon, & Teak
Kitties: Merry Cat & Mr. Magoo

Chickens: Dixie, Fran, Mabel, and Hattie

"Border Collie is my co-pilot"
IMG_6789-1.jpgDSCN1755-1.jpgth_IMAG0155.jpg

Midwest Border Collie Rescue


#14 terrecar

terrecar

    Senior Moment

  • Registered Users
  • 934 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:In a vat

Posted 15 June 2012 - 07:47 AM

I always used Vari Kennel airline approved crates. (Metallica playing in the background).



#15 Cynthia P

Cynthia P

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 590 posts

Posted 15 June 2012 - 08:03 AM

Well we are going to have to get a new truck or something...Right now we have a ford focus and a cooper mini and 6 trial dogs (and 14 dogs total)...so they ride loose. If there is a dog in the front seat the airbag is turned off on my Ford...but certainly not very safe!

When we are in the RV they are all in crates, mainly varikennels but some other cheaper plastic ones.

I've always kept a "lost dog" poster in my laptop so I can just swap out photos of whoever might be lost; hasn't happened yet. Bought collars that the majority wear with the name.

I love the idea of adding a ziploc with info, mainly contact information for me...because if we were in a crash with 14 dogs, i'm not sure they could figure out who was who.

Great discussion

#16 Maralynn

Maralynn

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 4,561 posts

Posted 15 June 2012 - 08:42 AM

So here's a question - I've seen lots of letters with instructions to board dogs/not place in pound in case of a crash, but does anyone know if emergency personel will follow those instructions? I mean are they able to find a boarding kennel/transport your dogs there? Or is protocal to take to the animal shelter (ie, so emergency personal don't need to worry about dealing with strange dogs)?

I think the letters are a really good thing to have in case of an accident, but I've always kinda wondered if they would be effective or not.

ETA- instead of ziploc bags, I've seen several people use dollar store zipper pencil cases. Brightly colored, sturdy, come with grommits that would make them simple to zip tie to a crate

Mara
Kenzi & Kolt

Kipp, my little dude 2004-2014
Missy, my good girl 1999-2011
K9 Knitter Woolie Dog


#17 WildFlower

WildFlower

    Sheep dog handler in training.

  • Registered Users
  • 1,776 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:SE Wisconsin
  • Interests:Dogs, stock work, chickens, gardening, photography

Posted 15 June 2012 - 09:45 AM

ETA- instead of ziploc bags, I've seen several people use dollar store zipper pencil cases. Brightly colored, sturdy, come with grommits that would make them simple to zip tie to a crate


That's what I use! :)

Vicki

Border Collies: Daisy, Devon, & Teak
Kitties: Merry Cat & Mr. Magoo

Chickens: Dixie, Fran, Mabel, and Hattie

"Border Collie is my co-pilot"
IMG_6789-1.jpgDSCN1755-1.jpgth_IMAG0155.jpg

Midwest Border Collie Rescue


#18 Olivia

Olivia

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 996 posts

Posted 15 June 2012 - 10:27 AM

I was wondering the same thing as Maralynn. Will emergency personnel actually transport my dogs to a boarding kennel if I ask or will they just send them to the shelter regardless of the letter? Also, I know all boarding kennels require vaccination proof, do you guys keep those records in with this letter? My dogs currently ride loose in my car but I am looking forward to graduation when I plan to purchase a van and strap down some varikennels and they will start riding in those!

#19 Dana Nichols

Dana Nichols

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 179 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Greeley, Colorado

Posted 15 June 2012 - 10:50 AM

I have a dog box topper for my pickup - it's like the Jones trailers, but made by a company who is no longer in business. I got it back when I used to do hunt tests & had labs. One thing I would note is that the more expensive trailers/boxes are made from stainless steel and the less expensive ones are generally aluminum. Both are fine, but the aluminum will oxidize and have black that will rub off. For lighter colored dogs, it may mean that the black will rub off on your dog's coat. My topper is alumimum, but the dog holes are lined in stainless steel. It's a less expensive alternative, yet still prevents the black from rubbing off on their coats.

The great thing about the stainless or aluminum crates/dog boxes is that not only are they super sturdy, they last FOREVER. My box is 12 years old and it's been on two different trucks. It still looks great. I have a friend whose box was over 30 years old and still going strong. They are pretty expensive, but you can shop around and find some fairly good deals sometimes. You can also sometimes find used crates or dog boxes on some of the gundog sites & boards.
________________

Dana Nichols
Greeley, Colorado

________________

#20 juliepoudrier

juliepoudrier

    Poseur extraordinaire and Borg Queen!

  • Registered Users
  • 15,329 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Virginia

Posted 15 June 2012 - 11:58 AM

Wow, I'd go bankrup trying to buy those nice crates for all my dogs. My Varikennels have served me (and the dogs) well. They are strapped in tiers in my van. Will they stand up to a really bad accident? I don't know. But I do think having the dogs confined in crates is safer for them.

I've always been leery of the trailers because I think it would be pretty easy for *someone else* to hit one and do some serious damage, but a lot of people pull them and I certainly haven't heard any horror stories (except the ones I consider in my mind).

J.

I know nothing with any certainty, but the sight of stars makes me dream.

~Vincent van Gogh



mydogs_small2.jpg

Julie Poudrier
New Kent, VA
Willow (6/1997-5/2014, run free, my heart), Boy (3/1995-10/2010, RIP), Jill (8/1996-5/2012, RIP), Farleigh (12/1998-7/2014, RIP), Kat, Twist, Lark, Phoebe, Pipit, and Birdie!
Willow's Rest, Tunis and mule sheep



Visit me on Facebook at Poudrier and Crowder, Set Out Specialists (P&C, SOS)



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Copyright: All posts and images on this site are protected by copyright, and may not be reproduced or distributed in any way without permission. Banner photo courtesy of Denise Wall, 2009 CDWall. For further information, contact info@bordercollie.org.