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#41 scullywags

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 08:28 PM

I found a list of canine rehab vets in North Carolina. Perhaps someone will be close enough to work out for you.



I printed the list today and planned to call around since i am not int he office Friday they may be open
I did get a bit of a boost the DVM thats doing my laser has a friend and DVM in Chicago that does rehab and is going to send my ultra sound photos to her and we have a therapuetic ultrasound on the way so i can drop him off each day and get him treated and pick him up after work
This DVM said she was willing to do to expand her knowledge and would work with me to find the a plan and get him on track
However I am going to see if I can get atleast second opinion from the rehab list
yes I am OCD I am grasping and thank you all again for pitching in

#42 scullywags

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 08:38 PM

Another vote for Regina. I'm a vet in Galax, VA, which is about 5mi from the NC border, but I am in the beginning stages of my rehab training. I could help you out if we have a little extra input from someone who is more experienced :) However, I think I know how Regina treats these injuries, in general. Your dog's case sounds more severe than the ones I've seen, though.

I could help you with stretches and exercises, when the time comes. I do not have an underwater treadmill (streams can replace these and are free) but do have some other stuff.

I'd also *really* highly recommend Univ of Tennessee. Depending on where you are in NC, it's not that far (closer than Regina, probably), and 100% worth it. The Rehab department there is top-notch.



You may think this is crazy the DVM thats doing my laser had long talk today she is willing to help me ordered therapy ultrasound machine we should have early next week we are going to treat him 5 days a week and she laserand she is looking for others vets to consult with on the excercise timelines and proper ones to do if you would consider her contacting you I think she wants to gather all the info she can and then we use him as the guinea pig it may take longer he may only be pet sound but if it makes him painless and helps other dogs in the future with the knowledge she gains I am happy with that today his pain was awfully high anyway I am on a mission thank you all again for the contacts and info you have given we are going to make him feel better and not be in hock over it.

#43 emilyfalk

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 12:55 PM

Sure. I'll get back to your PM, too. I've been out of town and away from the computer.
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#44 scullywags

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 08:46 PM

Another vote for Regina. I'm a vet in Galax, VA, which is about 5mi from the NC border, but I am in the beginning stages of my rehab training. I could help you out if we have a little extra input from someone who is more experienced :) However, I think I know how Regina treats these injuries, in general. Your dog's case sounds more severe than the ones I've seen, though.

I could help you with stretches and exercises, when the time comes. I do not have an underwater treadmill (streams can replace these and are free) but do have some other stuff.

I'd also *really* highly recommend Univ of Tennessee. Depending on where you are in NC, it's not that far (closer than Regina, probably), and 100% worth it. The Rehab department there is top-notch.



Emily wanted to say THANK YOU for trying to help me out been getting therapy US and will Do a dianostic US next week to see how things look hes tracking much better and his personality is coming back so he has to be feeling better paws crossed its going well
Your kindess did not go unoticed I was just flipping over his pain level and all the uncertainy

#45 scullywags

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 08:09 AM

Well I am updating this incase it helps anyone else
We are at week 14 getting therapy ultrasound 3 times a week
less crate time more hand walking and laser 1 time per week
using Respond system pulse bed 2 times per day at 30 minutes each
also was put on some herbs for tendons ligaments
upped the protein content in his diet and we get diagnostic US on Thursday to see how it looks inside

I can say from the outside he has no more roach to the back
bearing weight and able to stand on either side to hock his leg for urination
stride is longer more consistant
his eyes are bright and he is getting more like his old self

I feel confident hes going to recoup and be healthy
I plan on more rest and lots of rehab exercise and strict fitness program from this point on
to lessen the chance of reoccurance but am joyful he feels better
was killing me to see him in pain and depressed.

Thank you again to all the wonderful folks on this board for your input.

#46 PSmitty

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 10:40 AM

Great news! I hope he continues to feel good and improve.
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#47 Beach BCs

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 05:03 PM

Sorry to dredge up an old thread.

Does anyone have experience with a very young dog with an Iliopsoas strain? Any videos of what the gait looks like? I’ve been watching my new girl Faith in the yard. When she is walking or full out running her gait appears normal. However trotting, I can see a bit of a hitch in her giddyup (rear left leg). She will occasionally miss a step or you can just barely notice that she is not fully extending the leg. We are going to the vet on Monday. But in the meantime I am obsessing. I dread Faith needing long term rehab and keeping an 11 month old quiet for four months. I especially dread getting my husband on board. Grrrr…

PS- Since I’ve noticed the odd gait I’ve been limiting her activity. I don’t want an injury today to plague her for the rest of her life.

Thanks!!
Kate

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#48 Sue R

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:18 PM

Sorry to dredge up an old thread.

Does anyone have experience with a very young dog with an Iliopsoas strain? Any videos of what the gait looks like? I’ve been watching my new girl Faith in the yard. When she is walking or full out running her gait appears normal. However trotting, I can see a bit of a hitch in her giddyup (rear left leg). She will occasionally miss a step or you can just barely notice that she is not fully extending the leg. We are going to the vet on Monday. But in the meantime I am obsessing. I dread Faith needing long term rehab and keeping an 11 month old quiet for four months. I especially dread getting my husband on board. Grrrr…

PS- Since I’ve noticed the odd gait I’ve been limiting her activity. I don’t want an injury today to plague her for the rest of her life.

Thanks!!

I don't think you should overly concern yourself that this is due to any one particular thing until you are able to see the vet and let him/her thoroughly exam Faith to try and find out what is causing the irregularity in gait. These dogs are very stoic and one reason you may not be seeing a problem at the run is that they will often exert themselves or work right through pain. When my Celt was experiencing his torn ACL, you could not tell if he was "occupied" either with working the cattle or playing hard. You could see that he was "off" in his gait when he was not exerting himself (walking or trotting or even standing).

So, first, I'd suggest you get a diagnosis and a plan from your vet before you overly worry about it being any one particular injury. How you will deal with this is going to be dependent on what it actually is. Between now and then, I would suggest leash walks only, restricted movement in the house (crating, use of an xpen) and avoidance of playing or any opportunity for "explosive" movements. I would think that, if she isn't in too much discomfort, that a good bit of walking might be very good for her, keeping her occupied and exercised but in a low-key, low-impact way. Remember, too, that keeping her mentally occupied is just as or more important than physically exercised.

The use of frozen/stuffed Kongs in her crate will keep her busy; gentle training exercises like loose-leash walking and heeling; games (like a doggie version of the shell game, for instance); and other activities that will help her stay gently exercised and mentally exercised.

Very best wishes!

PS - The sooner you can have her seen, the better, since the vet will not only endeavor to diagnose the problem and outline a treatment plan, but may also determine to use an anti-inflammatory medication that will help her feel more comfortable and may also promote healing.

PPS - A friend, whose dog also had a TPLO for a torn ACL (like my dog, Celt, did) explained the need for following the rest and rehab protocol to her husband in this way - "If she gets hurt because you let her overdo it, you are going to have to pay for it." She received his total cooperation once she'd explained that to him.
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#49 Sue R

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:28 PM

And one more PPPS - Another injury that could cause an uneven gait or favoring a hind leg, is a strain, partial tear, or tear of the Cranial Cruciate Ligament (which many people call the ACL or Anterior Cruciate Ligament) in the knee joint of the hind leg. A description of the symptoms and what we observed when Celt injured his is found here.

What I would suggest looking for is "toe-touching". On standing, the dog extends the injured leg further back than the sound leg, and touches the ground or floor with the toes rather than resting his/her weight on the foot pad and toes. You can also observe this by comparing the wear on the toe and foot pads of the two hind feet - there are pictures in that topic illustrating this. This is a very typical symptom of an ACL tear or strain.
Sue Rayburn - Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult, but not the brightest firefly in the jar.

Celt, Megan, and Dan

"When the chips are down, watch where you step."

"The happiest people don't necessarily have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything." - author unknown

#50 Sue R

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:32 PM

And yet another thought - Celt did also have an illiopsoas injury (probably a bruise or strain) during the rehab for his TPLO, when I tripped and fell walking him in the dark, and either hit him when I fell or he pulled that muscle in moving to avoid me. For him, it took about a month or five weeks to recover from that, and we just reduced his in-house and walking rehab exercises for a few weeks until he was able to increase back to his previous level of work.

(No one has ever accused me of being brief...)
Sue Rayburn - Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult, but not the brightest firefly in the jar.

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"When the chips are down, watch where you step."

"The happiest people don't necessarily have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything." - author unknown

#51 gcv-border

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 09:21 PM

As Sue said, once you get a diagnosis you can move forward with a treatment plan (if necessary), but in the meantime, leash-walking and not allowing over-exertion is a good plan.

My dog was diagnosed with an ileopsoas strain when he was 15-16 months old. I have no idea how long he was 'suffering' with it before diagnosis since he showed no issues (that I could see) in his hind end movement. The rehab vet suggested leash walks, etc. and gave me a series of exercises for the hind end. He was rehabbed for about 4 months and has shown no recurrence (he is now 5 1/2 and participates in agility).

Good Luck with Faith.

Jovi

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#52 Beach BCs

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 10:53 PM

Thanks, Jovi & Sue, for all the info. I am considering the possibility of an ACL tear. Also, in the first month Faith was with me she grew a little over three inches. I do wonder if the rapid growth rate has anything to do with this. It's leveled out now. At any rate, until we can get into the vet I am limiting Faith's exercise. Monday is the soonest she could see us. To keep Faith's brain occupied we've been working on identifying individual toys, bringing them to me or putting them in a specific place, and other random tasks & tricks.

I suppose what my brain is doing is "hoping for the best, but preparing for the worst".

Thanks again!
Kate

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#53 Sue R

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:26 AM

Sounds like you have a very well thought out approach that you are implementing.

Very best wishes!
Sue Rayburn - Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult, but not the brightest firefly in the jar.

Celt, Megan, and Dan

"When the chips are down, watch where you step."

"The happiest people don't necessarily have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything." - author unknown

#54 Sue R

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:26 AM

Sounds like you have a very well thought out approach that you are implementing.

Very best wishes!
Sue Rayburn - Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult, but not the brightest firefly in the jar.

Celt, Megan, and Dan

"When the chips are down, watch where you step."

"The happiest people don't necessarily have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything." - author unknown

#55 gcv-border

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:30 PM

Also, in the first month Faith was with me she grew a little over three inches. I do wonder if the rapid growth rate has anything to do with this. It's leveled out now. Thanks again!


That certainly is a very rapid growth rate. I had a friend who had 2 children (of 5) that were plagued with joint pain during a rapid growth phase. The pain subsided after a while (I am assuming it subsided once their growth rate subsided and the body became used to its new structure.) I wonder if dogs can have a similar problem?

Jovi

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