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What is a hanging tree cowdog?


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#1 Soda-pop

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 09:02 PM

What kind of dog is it? Is it a type of border collie, a cross-bred dog, a type of aussie? I have no idea! I googled but I find different information. What is their general usefulness? Are they good practical working dogs?

I'm just curious for curiosity's sake.

Thanks.

#2 glennkopp

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 09:22 PM

Two good descriptions:

www.charliescowdogs.com/hangin-tree-cowdog.shtml

www.allisonsstockdogs.com

#3 Sue R

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 06:08 AM

Gary Ericsson developed the Hangin Tree Cowdog. They have their own registry. Here is a good description, taken from his website:

These slick or short-haired cowdogs were originally bred by using a cross of approximately 1/8 Catahoula Leopard (for their slick coat and their ability to trail, find, and hold up cattle), 1/4 Australian Shepherd (Hanginí Tree Black Bear, who won both the Idaho and Montana Stockdog Championships and sold for $20,000.00, was the only Australian Shepherd used, because of his courage and ability to handle any kind of cattle), 1/4 Kelpie (for their endurance, short hair, and herding instinct), and 3/8 to Ĺ cattle-bred Border Collie (for their ease of training and handling, and their intense herding desire.) This has resulted in a tough cowdog that can easily be taught to trail and find cattle. Choc and Gary Ericsson originated the breed to be the cowboy's ultimate dog. It was named after the family brand--Hangin' Tree. The breed was designed for endurance, as many cowboys need a dog that can go all day and withstand harsh conditions...and sometimes even harsh treatment. Of utmost importance was the dog's ability to hit both heads and heels of cattle. The foundation stock that was selected for the original registry were intelligent, courageous, hardworking and loyal. These slick haired dogs don't collect burrs or stickers and withstand heat well. In winter, they develop a thick undercoat in colder climates. Eligible pups must demonstrate the ability to hit both heads and heels of cattle.
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#4 Jeanne Joy

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 11:51 AM

The type of dog the Ericssons were trying to create is pictured in Gary's illustrations. From what I've been told they don't breed consistently:

http://stockdogsavvy...in-tree-cowdog/
It has been said, "Most of the footprints in the sands of time were made by working shoes." By the side of those footprints are paw prints.

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#5 Sue R

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 04:49 PM

From what I've been told they don't breed consistently:

That may be your experience but I have seen quite a few and they are fairly consistent - some bitches are a bit fine and some males are taller and lankier than others, but no more different in size range than the Border Collie, and maybe more consistent in build and coat. When properly culled (as the registry demands), they are pretty consistent in terms of intensity, stock sense, and athleticism. But, as always, there is some variation of course. The dogs I have seen have largely been from Gary's breeding directly, so that could be one reason why I've seen a good deal of consistency.
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#6 juliepoudrier

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 08:31 PM

Sue,
If I had to hazard a guess, I'd say that when Jeanne Joy said they don't breed consistently, she means that they don't breed in a manner to consistently reproduce themselves. The point that you make about culling simply means that the dogs that are produced that don't match the standard are removed so that what you *see* does appear to be consistent. But how many were culled in the process? <--Rhetorical question. In other words, if they have to do a lot of culling in order to keep a consistent look within the dogs registered--the breed--then the dogs themselves must not be breeding entirely true.

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#7 Sue R

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 09:04 PM

Sue,
If I had to hazard a guess, I'd say that when Jeanne Joy said they don't breed consistently, she means that they don't breed in a manner to consistently reproduce themselves. The point that you make about culling simply means that the dogs that are produced that don't match the standard are removed so that what you *see* does appear to be consistent. But how many were culled in the process? <--Rhetorical question. In other words, if they have to do a lot of culling in order to keep a consistent look within the dogs registered--the breed--then the dogs themselves must not be breeding entirely true.

J.

Understood. I should have been more clear, however, in stating that the culling was largely for a working "standard" rather than any appearance standard. They are, I believe, culled if they are not slick-coated but I am not aware of any other appearance/physical reason to cull. Gary is someone who would have culled strongly to develop the breed.

But, my experience is limited to seeing dogs largely within one generation of Gary's breeding and so might not be at all representative of what one might find in different locations and from different people's breeding programs. And, of course, at the point I saw any of the dogs, the culling would have already been done. So, my premise was pretty faulty.

I'll regret not seeing you next week in KY.
Sue Rayburn - Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult, but not the brightest firefly in the jar.

Celt, Megan, and Dan

"When the chips are down, watch where you step."

"The happiest people don't necessarily have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything." - author unknown


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