Jump to content


Photo

Foster progress...


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Jumpin Boots

Jumpin Boots

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 669 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NW Washington
  • Interests:Farming, sheep, gardening, agility, reining

Posted 22 November 2009 - 01:04 PM

So on January 21st it will be one year since we were involved in a mill/hoarder raid where over 50 dogs were taken. Since then we have been fostering two of the mini aussies and since they are in a court battle we could be fostering them for months, or maybe years to come.

Our girls have gotten used to life with us and while they have improved in many areas food has continued to be an issue. I wouldn't say that they had horrible food aggression there was no lunging at people or serious growling, it was more the go tense, hover, freeze and stop eating if you got too close. The weird thing is that this took a few months to happen at first they were fine, I think it was when the routine of feeding became set for them they weren't so worried about scarfing food as about protecting it. Early on we did have a few doggy fights revolve around food, but that was quickly resolved, the human resentment has taken a bit longer.

Well, this week I had major break throughs with both :rolleyes: Ruby was the first, what I have been doing is giving them their food, going back to the one who was fed first and massaging her back while she stands frozen over her food bowl, as soon as she would lick her chops, yawn, or break her visual stare at the wall I would walk away to the next one. I knew I was making progress, because when I started this Lego would be long done with her food before Ruby had even thought about relaxing and more recently she would lick her chops as soon as I put my hand on her. Well last week I up'd the ante, and didn't stop her back massage when she looked at me, then she got a very guilty look on her face, lowered her head and picked up a kibble...I walked away, wanting to jump with excitement, but not wanting to freak her out. Lego feeds so much off of Ruby and showed the same behavior 2 days later. Well last night and this morning Ruby didn't even stop eating as I approached her and reached down to massage, she even let me touch her head with no notice except a friendly glance of 'I love you' and a tail-less butt wiggle.

I am just so tickled for these girls, it gives me hope that if they live to get out of the court system and go up for adoption that they will actually be able to intergrate into a normal family home. Thanks for reading :D

#2 IPSY

IPSY

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 665 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 22 November 2009 - 01:13 PM

This world needs more people like you , Jumpin Boots...THANK YOU :rolleyes:

#3 Ms.DaisyDuke

Ms.DaisyDuke

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,106 posts

Posted 22 November 2009 - 02:00 PM

That's pretty good progress! Awesome!
Have you read Jean Donaldson's "Mine"? That would be a good resource for you. Also, possibly hand feeding them too might help increase the bond and lessen food issues towards people...?

#4 Jumpin Boots

Jumpin Boots

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 669 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NW Washington
  • Interests:Farming, sheep, gardening, agility, reining

Posted 22 November 2009 - 02:09 PM

That's pretty good progress! Awesome!
Have you read Jean Donaldson's "Mine"? That would be a good resource for you. Also, possibly hand feeding them too might help increase the bond and lessen food issues towards people...?


Thanks for the book suggestion, I'll put it on my Christmas list :rolleyes:

Hand feeding has helped some, but they haven't shown signs of having issues eating out of my hand, only when you would try to touch them with your other hand and just incase either did get aggressive I didn't really think that having one hand right in front of their mouth's was the best idea :D Although the next step will be to work on being able to touch them more while they are eating and get to the point where I can have my hands in their bowls. I think it really revolves more around the bowl, as treats are no issue what so ever.

Oh, if I could only talk to them and have them actually understand what I am saying...

#5 Ms.DaisyDuke

Ms.DaisyDuke

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,106 posts

Posted 22 November 2009 - 07:16 PM

One thing I am working to get my current foster conditioned to being touched and having outstretched hands near him is having kibble in one hand and having the other hand open, palm facing him near his face/neck and collar while he eats, it's a totally different thing than what you are facing, but I would imagine that it might help some if you were to hand feed with one hand and work up to petting them with the other hand. Obviously, if their body language is saying "No thanks" you might have to wait on that one, but it could help. Also sitting by their bowl while they are eating and dropping treats (like EXTRA yummy) in every time you touch them, it might help add additional positive feelings to what you are already doing?!

#6 Jumpin Boots

Jumpin Boots

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 669 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NW Washington
  • Interests:Farming, sheep, gardening, agility, reining

Posted 22 November 2009 - 10:30 PM

Thank you for your advice, they both try so hard, it's so sad to see the desire in their faces to do right, but also the overwelming fear to not trust. It's really horrible that people do this to animals, I just don't understand.

#7 Ms.DaisyDuke

Ms.DaisyDuke

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,106 posts

Posted 23 November 2009 - 10:54 AM

Oh, it's beyond terrible what happens to some of these animals. doG knows, I've seen some horrible stuff! I think with some time though, these kids will come around. I do believe that "Mine" will help you a lot if you can get a copy!

#8 Jumpin Boots

Jumpin Boots

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 669 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NW Washington
  • Interests:Farming, sheep, gardening, agility, reining

Posted 31 March 2012 - 11:47 PM

Justice at last...

Our mini aussie fosters, who we've had since January 2009 (yes, over 3 years!) and have been part of a court battle from a puppy mill/hoarder situation have finally been released to the rescue group and are now up for adoption. Our girls were spayed 2 weeks ago and can finally start the search for their forever homes. There are about 40 mini aussies and a couple italian greyhounds who have been living in limbo with foster families. There were originally about 50 total dogs, but a few of them were considered a different case b/c they were on a different part of the property and were released after about a year. Some have become foster failures :) but many are looking for homes. It's been such a long road to freedom and good futures for these dogs, I'm so happy that they will be given the chance to have families of their own.

#9 rushdoggie

rushdoggie

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,121 posts
  • Location:Vancouver, WA

Posted 01 April 2012 - 12:09 AM

Wonderful, do you have a link?

f84d543e-e476-430d-b76a-da3c85c28501_zps

 

Training is a journey, not a destination. If you think you’ve arrived, you’ve already missed out.
Denise Fenzi


#10 Jumpin Boots

Jumpin Boots

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 669 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NW Washington
  • Interests:Farming, sheep, gardening, agility, reining

Posted 01 April 2012 - 10:08 AM

The rescue group is SPOT. They are slowly getting the dogs posted up onto petfinder and are holding some adoption days in Skagit County so interested people can come meet multiple dogs the same day.

Thanks for asking!

#11 rushdoggie

rushdoggie

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,121 posts
  • Location:Vancouver, WA

Posted 01 April 2012 - 11:42 AM

The rescue group is SPOT. They are slowly getting the dogs posted up onto petfinder and are holding some adoption days in Skagit County so interested people can come meet multiple dogs the same day.

Thanks for asking!


Cool, I will pass it on to someone who I think might be interested.

f84d543e-e476-430d-b76a-da3c85c28501_zps

 

Training is a journey, not a destination. If you think you’ve arrived, you’ve already missed out.
Denise Fenzi



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Copyright: All posts and images on this site are protected by copyright, and may not be reproduced or distributed in any way without permission. Banner photo courtesy of Denise Wall, 2009 CDWall. For further information, contact info@bordercollie.org.