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How dangerous is eating deer poop?


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#1 Murphys mom

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 04:20 PM

[size="2"]This is a new issue that has come up on our field walks! He always has his nose to the ground and lately seems to go from pile to pile! :rolleyes: Sometimes I can get him to leave it but not all the time.
Should I be taking extra precautions with worming, even if I haven't seen anything. Thanks

#2 Sue R

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 06:16 PM

If eating ruminant or other herbivore poop was a hazard, my dogs would all be dead by now.

If, on the other hand, he is eating too much, put him on a lead or long line so you have some control if he won't respond to your "leave it" command.

Just avoid kisses for a little while afterwards...
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#3 Tommy Coyote

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 06:43 PM

[size="2"]This is a new issue that has come up on our field walks! He always has his nose to the ground and lately seems to go from pile to pile! :rolleyes: Sometimes I can get him to leave it but not all the time.
Should I be taking extra precautions with worming, even if I haven't seen anything. Thanks

We have lots of deer poop around here. Never seemed to faze my dogs at all. They just think its a wonderful snack.

#4 stockdogranch

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 06:59 PM

When I saw the title of the thread, I laughed and my thought was, "Ask Sue!" Apparently, her pup regularly eats his weight in deer poop,
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#5 Murphys mom

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 07:09 PM

Thanks, I feel better now, it's not that he eats a ton just grazes as we a playing. I'm make sure to have him give dear daughter the first kisses after those trips. :rolleyes:

#6 Sue R

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 08:35 PM

I want you to know, Anna, that by being more vigilant (and using the Flexi or long line) to avoid "over-indulgence", he's reduced his personal poop output from five a day to three. Too much was too much, but just a reasonable amount is just right. Ed says they get very valuable vitamins from eating cow poop and similar delicacies. I think Dan thinks deer poops are the M+M's of the pasture snacks, or else they just remind the Surfer Boy of his sheepy home in sunny, southern CA.
Sue Rayburn - Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult, but not the brightest firefly in the jar.

Celt, Megan, and Dan

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#7 esox

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 10:04 AM

Alex doesn't eat deer poop. Unfortunately she thinks it is the best smelling perfume in the world.

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#8 Cody & Duchess

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 10:17 AM

Sometimes they pick - but mostly leave it works. It is the fresh elk or etc poop that Duchess wants to roll in. Friends say that she is making herself invisible. The worst is when she runs up to you with fresh decoration on her and wants to share. Then as I say get away, get away that only excites her more to come for a hug. I have to remember to put a towel in the car to wrap her until she gets home -yuck.

#9 bcnewe2

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 10:26 AM

I'm cool with poo snacks but Dew brought home a dead rat! I draw the line there!

Jazz goes out each morning after her breakfast and has desert. Cow pies, deer berries, and our newest fav....yummmmm Turkey poo!
As long as they aren't wearing it, or eating enough to throw up I suppose I'm ok with extras.

But I do occasionally have to worm for tape. Not sure if it's poo eating or was back in AR sheep pellet eating but about 2xs per year I worm for tape. Even if I don't see them. My LGD's had horrible issues with tape, that could have been part of our issues. If I see one dog with them, I worm all dogs.

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#10 martySQ

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 05:30 PM

When Bess came home to live with me, she had several kinds of worms, one that required a few rounds of something extra and the parasite was from the sheep I think.

#11 Sue R

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 07:00 PM

Here's an interesting link about tapeworms from the Drs. Foster and Smith folks:

http://www.peteducat...=...254&aid=769

Plus, there is a whole list of articles about different worm species and worms in general at this page:

http://pet-informati...e...score&srt=0

I am more concerned about my dogs eating fox or coyote teces than anything from a herbivore but, as the articles point out, dogs can get certain tapeworms and/or other worms from eating manure. I can't stop them eating it short of putting a muzzle on each, leashing all whenever outside, or not taking them outside (we have deer poop in the yard, under the apple trees). So, I try to keep the intake moderate, do fecals every year, keep an eye on things in between, and use Interceptor (which is not effective on tapeworms, as far as I know).

I have never seen signs of taperworms in our dogs, just our cats occasionally and, when I do see segments, everyone gets medicated if I think they all need it, otherwise just the one with segments.

Pups or new dogs in a household should always be checked - while everyone else has come in here negative, Bute had both Giardia (definitely something that humans can contract) and Hookworm (which took ssveral treatments to eliminate).
Sue Rayburn - Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult, but not the brightest firefly in the jar.

Celt, Megan, and Dan

"When the chips are down, watch where you step."

"The happiest people don't necessarily have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything." - author unknown

#12 powerfulgazelle

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 07:43 PM

Hmm..how about goose poop?

Kip thinks geese are treat dispensers.
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#13 trailrider

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 09:57 PM

Just be very careful to avoid raccoon manure. In north eastern america, the coons are 80% likely to carry baylis ascaris - just a round worm for the coons. But when eggs from manure (in the dust too) get into your lungs or stomach, they hatch to larvae, enter the bloodstream and lodge in the brain. Then they just munch away, destroying the brain cells. These eggs are long lasting, such as in sand, or on hay bales. Case histories show this damage in humans and all mammals.


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