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Vet practice question


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#21 Sue R

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 08:21 AM

A couple of times I have gone to my vet practice and been very specific about what I wanted done, whether it was testing a sample or dental work. When the staff did not do as I asked (ran tests that were specifically noted as "not wanted" or did a dental when I had it in writing that I did not want it done), my vet or the office manager saw that the charges were removed and/or I was reimbursed. 


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#22 Maralynn

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 09:27 AM

I, too, am a client who wants a vet who will work with me on basics. I am the first one who will be at a vet if something doesn't feel right - a suddenly weirdly swollen foot and I went to the emergency vet on a weekend. On the flip side, I'm very comfortable with wait and see with other things - a presumed spot of demodex and I'm taking a wait and see approach.

I want to have that relationship where I can talk to them and they feel able (and willing) to trust my judgment on some things.

I'm in the process of deciding if I should find a new local vet. I love the fact that my normal one is pretty laid back and they know me at the office, I have no issues doing minimal vaccinations, etc, and they're genuinely nice and caring. But an X-ray was misread with Kenzi and I got the feeling that they really didn't have a clue what was wrong with her leg after three months of trying stuff. Spent some time googling and I had a strong suspicion what was going on. Five minutes with a specialist and they confirmed it. That was disappointing. I mean, I don't expect that my vet is well versed on everything dog especially as a pet practice and I have working dogs. But a torn ligament issue should at least be in their radar with a Border Collie.

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#23 gcv-border

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 02:35 PM

I, too, am a client who wants a vet who will work with me on basics. I am the first one who will be at a vet if something doesn't feel right - a suddenly weirdly swollen foot and I went to the emergency vet on a weekend. On the flip side, I'm very comfortable with wait and see with other things - a presumed spot of demodex and I'm taking a wait and see approach.

I want to have that relationship where I can talk to them and they feel able (and willing) to trust my judgment on some things.

I'm in the process of deciding if I should find a new local vet. I love the fact that my normal one is pretty laid back and they know me at the office, I have no issues doing minimal vaccinations, etc, and they're genuinely nice and caring. But an X-ray was misread with Kenzi and I got the feeling that they really didn't have a clue what was wrong with her leg after three months of trying stuff. Spent some time googling and I had a strong suspicion what was going on. Five minutes with a specialist and they confirmed it. That was disappointing. I mean, I don't expect that my vet is well versed on everything dog especially as a pet practice and I have working dogs. But a torn ligament issue should at least be in their radar with a Border Collie.

 



I'm in the process of deciding if I should find a new local vet. I love the fact that my normal one is pretty laid back and they know me at the office, I have no issues doing minimal vaccinations, etc, and they're genuinely nice and caring. But an X-ray was misread with Kenzi and I got the feeling that they really didn't have a clue what was wrong with her leg after three months of trying stuff. Spent some time googling and I had a strong suspicion what was going on. Five minutes with a specialist and they confirmed it. That was disappointing. I mean, I don't expect that my vet is well versed on everything dog especially as a pet practice and I have working dogs. But a torn ligament issue should at least be in their radar with a Border Collie.

I think a 'general' vet tries their best, but they can't know everything. I really appreciate a vet who is ready to refer to a specialist, rather than trying to deal with it themselves.

 

While I don't know the specifics of Maralynn's experience, it does remind me of two experiences I had with my dog. One in which the specialist saved me a lot of $$ and my dog a lot of pain, and one which required me to spend more $$, but ultimately solved the problem rather than letting it hang on and cause continued pain to the dog.

 

At 15 months of age, Torque developed an intermittent limp in in the R rear leg. General vet does X-rays of both hips AND shoulders and announces that he has mice (loose bits of cartilage) in his R rear leg and L front shoulder that were indicative of OCD. His treatment plan was for 2 separate surgeries ($6000 total), 6 months apart, and a year of recovery. Devastated, I took the X-rays to a rehab vet who instead diagnosed an iliopsoas strain and a treatment plan for 4 months of leash walking with specific exercises. Of course a couple more appointments so she could follow his progress and then clear him for normal activity.

 

Then at 3 years of age, Torque came up lame - front L shoulder. He was a tripod (for several hours) when I took him in to the emergency vet on a Sunday morning. They took him "into the back" to gait him and observe his limping. When they brought him back about 5 minutes later, they said he didn't limp and questioned me, again, about how badly he was limping. Heck, he was a tripod as he walked across their parking lot. Obviously that border collie adrenaline overcame his pain - and he just loves people so all the attention was wonderful to him. Home with pain pills and anti-inflammatories and instructions to leash-walk for 2 weeks before returning to normal activity. I knew enough this time to immediately make an appointment with the rehab vet, and she detected major problems in his shoulder. In fact, she referred me to VOSM (Dr. Canapp) because she was pretty sure he would need surgery. (She had magic fingers that could detect subtle injuries. I am so sad she retired.) And yup, he had torn his bicep tendon badly enough that it required tendon release surgery. What also came out of this experience related to his first 'injury' where the general vet had seen 'mice' in his shoulder joint. Dr. Canapp also saw the mice in his shoulder joint with the Xrays he took, but said that they weren't much to worry about and that it was not uncommon for general vets to mistake these as an indicator of OCD.


Jovi

"Folks will know how large your soul is by the way you treat a dog."  Charles F. Duran



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