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Which Heartworm Preventative Is Safe For My Border Collie?


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#21 Liz P

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 08:50 AM

Yeah, I read that page.  Most of the stuff on there is almost certainly unrelated to using the drug.



#22 Gary_and_Karen

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 09:15 AM

Thanks, I'm sure you can understand being leary when you read where something has caused thousands of deaths.

 

It is a shame that there are meds approved for use that has caused problems for so many, but that even seems to be the case with some of the meds for humans too so I guess we just have to really do some research. 

 

Just goes to show that just because something has been "approved" does not automatically mean it is safe, after all, look at the harmful dog treats that stores keep selling even though many have complained about dogs getting sick and/or dying, especially the treat from China, so just because something is allowed to be sold does not automatically mean it is safe.

 

With every medication there are risks. I don't use Trifexis, yet.I have been using Interceptor and Comfortis, which I believe is more or less what Trifexis is. (I was lucky to purchase a significant amount of Interceptor when she shortage came about.) There are other HW meds out there. Maybe do some research and find another you are more comfortable with. But I wouldn't risk taking your dog off of a monthly preventative. Just my .02.


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#23 Gary_and_Karen

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 09:22 AM

I sure would like to think that Triflexis was ok for sure, but when so many have had negative reactions soon after giving it to their dog (throwing up, ect.) it give you serious doubts as to how safe it really is.

 

As far as Heartguard, there was one comment from that other web page that seemed to show genuine reason for concern -

 

(quote)

"Julee Johnson from Medina, Ohio, Usa: "I read on here that a women's Border Collie had seizures when her dog was on Heart Guard. I do not keep my Border Collie mix on Heart Guard year round. She has had three seizures that I have witnessed over the years. I went through her records and she was on Heart Guard at the time of all three seizures."

(end quote)

 

Yeah, I read that page.  Most of the stuff on there is almost certainly unrelated to using the drug.


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#24 Tommy Coyote

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 09:34 AM

That's how I feel about it, too.  In this part of the country there is a very real danger from heartworm and other parasites, too.  And both of my dogs love to stay outside.

 

I'm using Triflexis, too and we haven't had any problems.  I'll see my vet on Tuesday and I';; try to remember to ask him if they have had any reports of problems.  



#25 Gary_and_Karen

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 10:26 AM

Thanks, let us know what he says, I plan on taking a copy of the info I posted to my vet to see what she says.

 

Even though I have not noticed any real negative effects from Triflexis yet, what concerns me is that some of those owners said it was months after being on it they then had a bad reaction so I don't know if it takes a while for things to build up or if a dog might need to reach a certain age to be more sensitive to it or what.

 

Just wondering, how great is the risk of an unmedicated dog getting heartworm ?  I ask that because my previous dog was not on any regular monthly meds and survived healthy for 15 years.  (I think back then I just was not as aware of stuff as I am now so did not know it was something to be concerned about)

 

That's how I feel about it, too.  In this part of the country there is a very real danger from heartworm and other parasites, too.  And both of my dogs love to stay outside.

 

I'm using Triflexis, too and we haven't had any problems.  I'll see my vet on Tuesday and I';; try to remember to ask him if they have had any reports of problems.  


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#26 Gideon's girl

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 10:59 AM

It depends on where you live.  Where I live heartworms are extremely prevalent, and I would consider any dog not on prevention here to be extremely likely to get them.  Here is a link that explains some of the cons to using it and has some info to help you decide if you can only use heartworm prevention for part of the year, which is what a lot of Northerners do.

http://www.theholist...ums/topic/worm/



#27 Gary_and_Karen

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 11:32 AM

Thanks, we live on the edge of a very small semi-rural town in South Carolina with about 10 miles of woods on one side of our property.

 

I checked out that link and a poster on that page did not have any good to say about heartworm meds, here is part of what was on that page:

 

(quote)

HW Pills are Immune Wreckers

 

Dr. Dodds catalogued disease coming after the heartworm monthly pills (Ivermectin or Milbemycin) that ranged from

lethargy
staggering
vomiting and diarrhea
unable to rise
all the way to

sudden death “2 days after dose”
bone marrow failure
seizures
severe ITP (immune mediated thrombocytopenia, not able to clot blood)
liver failure
IMHA and death (immune mediated hemolytic anemia, dying from immune attack on the dog’s own red blood cells)

 

It’s crystal clear to me now that these drugs pack a much more insidious wallop than just toxins. They are immune disrupters. Serious risks to your animal’s health and very existence

(end of quote)

 

......so this seems to be a dilema, heartworm is supposed to be a serious condition, but many are also saying that the meds used for heartworm can be very bad also - what are we supposed to do ?

 

 

It depends on where you live.  Where I live heartworms are extremely prevalent, and I would consider any dog not on prevention here to be extremely likely to get them.  Here is a link that explains some of the cons to using it and has some info to help you decide if you can only use heartworm prevention for part of the year, which is what a lot of Northerners do.

http://www.theholist...ums/topic/worm/


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#28 Falon's Mom

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 05:40 PM

I take everything i read on an internet website with a grain of salt. I would be asking my vet and fellow pet owners around me about the meds that do work well in my given area without as many of the side effects as possible. I am neither a vet or a doctor, but I have no problem going to either for more information.
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#29 Gideon's girl

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 06:27 PM

It's all about being as informed as possible and then deciding about what risks you can live with.  The lady on that site is a friend of mine and she was toxically injured almost to death so has a very strong reaction to anybody taking or giving anything that is toxic.  She also lives in an area where she only has to worry about heartworm exposure for a very few months at the height of summer.  The take away from that article was the info about the weather/temp affecting mosquito transmission of the microfilaria.  By knowing the weather where you live, you can tell when it has been warm enough, long enough that you need to worry about mosquitos transmitting heartworms and therefore you will know when you need to use prevention.



#30 Gary_and_Karen

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 01:35 PM

Thanks to both of you and I truely understand that you can't always assume 100% of stuff on the web is accurate, but at least some of those owners must have had some reason for concern, right ?

 

Am I just being overly cautious ?  I just care about my dog like I know y'all do and just want to do my research and be reasonably sure about stuff.

 

I take everything i read on an internet website with a grain of salt. I would be asking my vet and fellow pet owners around me about the meds that do work well in my given area without as many of the side effects as possible. I am neither a vet or a doctor, but I have no problem going to either for more information.

 

 

It's all about being as informed as possible and then deciding about what risks you can live with.  The lady on that site is a friend of mine and she was toxically injured almost to death so has a very strong reaction to anybody taking or giving anything that is toxic.  She also lives in an area where she only has to worry about heartworm exposure for a very few months at the height of summer.  The take away from that article was the info about the weather/temp affecting mosquito transmission of the microfilaria.  By knowing the weather where you live, you can tell when it has been warm enough, long enough that you need to worry about mosquitos transmitting heartworms and therefore you will know when you need to use prevention.


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#31 Blackdawgs

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 05:47 PM

I live in the deep south. One of my neighbors did not want to "poison" his dog with heartworm preventative.  The dog died from heartworms. 

 

Pick your poison, I suppose.



#32 Gideon's girl

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 06:34 PM

Exactly.  By the way, since I choose to use heartworm prevention on my dogs, I reduce their toxic load in other ways.  I don't use chemicals around the house.  I feed a natural food.  I feed antioxidants so their bodies can clear out any toxins they pick up.



#33 waffles

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 07:29 PM

I live in the deep south. One of my neighbors did not want to "poison" his dog with heartworm preventative.  The dog died from heartworms. 

 

Pick your poison, I suppose.

Did they never have their dog tested?!  HW does not kill instantly-from what I know it can take about 3-5 years.  You can  choose to not put your dog on a pill and then get them tested every 6 months.  But if you live in a warmer climate and don't use a flea preventative that repels mosquitoes, never get your dog tested for years, then you are just asking for HW's to kill your dog.  I see a lot of dogs brought up from the south through rescue that are positive.  Mostly neglected dogs that lived outside.  

 

Here in NY they are not common at all.  Never heard of a dog having them but the vets here will make it sound like a serious issue.  Though most people don't know what HW is-most think it is an intestinal parasite and have no idea how dogs transmit it or what it does to them.  I have talked to many customers who think their dog can get HW from going to the dog park.  

 

I choose to use HW pills seasonally, and honestly don't even like doing that.  I follow the map that was posted on Terrierman's blog a while ago.  There are no mosquitoes here for most of the year.  It just does not stay about 50 day and night for much of the year, so why give HW pills year round?  I also have my dog tested every year (which is just for my peace of mind-I never expect it to come back positive) and use Advantix seasonally as well.  

http://terriermandot...tworm-scam.html



#34 Blackdawgs

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 08:10 PM

I don't know if the neighbors tested the dog or not.

I do know that here in the south mosquitoes are present year around.  I do know that shelters and rescues are full of dogss with heartworm. 

I do know that if you chose to not give your dog heart worm preventative and if the dog should test positive (and it eventually will in the deep south), you will have to "poison" your dog to get rid of the heartworms.  And the dose of "poison" used to get rid of the heart worms  is a heck of a lot higher than a single dose of  the monthly preventative.

And guess what, mosquitoe repellents are "poisons", too. 

I've experiented with various home made "natural" concoctions and they don't work.

Here the mosquitoes are BAD especially after rain.  So, bad that the city sprays and so bad that every year humans contract various moquitoe born diseases.



#35 Liz P

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 08:12 PM

I live near the NY border in MA.  We do have a heartworm problem here.  I've treated more dogs in this area than I did while living in "heartworm central" on the Mississippi River.  Part of the problem is that this area is full of water where mosquitoes can reproduce.  The other part of the problem is people thinking that heartworm isn't found in this area, so they don't use prevention. 

 

I would personally much rather risk the monthly pills than the treatment.

 

I am curious how Dr. Dodds decided that all those medical problems occurred in association with the heartworm pills (if people are actually giving them monthly, how do you prove association?).



#36 waffles

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 08:22 PM

I completely agree with you.  I was just stating for people who do not want to dose their dogs at all, they don't have to.  But they obviously run the risk of their dog getting HW and then having to treat it.  Everyone has to make their own call.  If I lived in the south I would definitely be dosing yearly.  

 

Also, aren't many of the reactions listed on the Dr. Dodds page, also on the boxes for HW pills?  I don't think mine warns against death though... <_<



#37 Gary_and_Karen

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 08:33 PM

Well we live in South Carolina in a semi-rural area so I guess mosquitoes can be an almost year round concern.

 

I still haven't decided what to do yet, but from what everyone says it seems like using a HW preventative is much preferrable over not using one. 

 

I guess the question then would be should I continue to use Triflexis or something else ?

 

(I already had ordered the next dose before I saw those web sites I originally posted, but from what I read on this forum I don't remember anyone having anything bad to say about Triflexis so should I give her that next does or throw it away ?)

 

Do any of you all use Triflexis or know owners who do ?

 

Someone mentioned that a dose of HW meds is usually good for 45 to 60 days even though 30 days is used simply as a means to make it easier to remember the same day each month, so would it then be ok to switch to 45 days without concern of HW happening ?

 

 

I live in the deep south. One of my neighbors did not want to "poison" his dog with heartworm preventative.  The dog died from heartworms. 

 

Pick your poison, I suppose.

 

 

Exactly.  By the way, since I choose to use heartworm prevention on my dogs, I reduce their toxic load in other ways.  I don't use chemicals around the house.  I feed a natural food.  I feed antioxidants so their bodies can clear out any toxins they pick up.

 

 

Did they never have their dog tested?!  HW does not kill instantly-from what I know it can take about 3-5 years.  You can  choose to not put your dog on a pill and then get them tested every 6 months.  But if you live in a warmer climate and don't use a flea preventative that repels mosquitoes, never get your dog tested for years, then you are just asking for HW's to kill your dog.  I see a lot of dogs brought up from the south through rescue that are positive.  Mostly neglected dogs that lived outside.  

 

Here in NY they are not common at all.  Never heard of a dog having them but the vets here will make it sound like a serious issue.  Though most people don't know what HW is-most think it is an intestinal parasite and have no idea how dogs transmit it or what it does to them.  I have talked to many customers who think their dog can get HW from going to the dog park.  

 

I choose to use HW pills seasonally, and honestly don't even like doing that.  I follow the map that was posted on Terrierman's blog a while ago.  There are no mosquitoes here for most of the year.  It just does not stay about 50 day and night for much of the year, so why give HW pills year round?  I also have my dog tested every year (which is just for my peace of mind-I never expect it to come back positive) and use Advantix seasonally as well.  

http://terriermandot...tworm-scam.html


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#38 waffles

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 08:34 PM

I live near the NY border in MA.  We do have a heartworm problem here.  I've treated more dogs in this area than I did while living in "heartworm central" on the Mississippi River.  Part of the problem is that this area is full of water where mosquitoes can reproduce.  The other part of the problem is people thinking that heartworm isn't found in this area, so they don't use prevention. 

 

I would personally much rather risk the monthly pills than the treatment.

 

I am curious how Dr. Dodds decided that all those medical problems occurred in association with the heartworm pills (if people are actually giving them monthly, how do you prove association?).

I  should have been more specific since NY is so large- I am in Western NY and hardly ever see mosquitoes except during warm summer nights or near ponds.  Guess I am glad for that, both for me and my dog.  Do you see many HW positive dogs that live inside and are typically 'well cared for' by most standards?  It always seems that dogs in rescue that are positive around here are dogs that lived outside and were in general, neglected.  I have read some about the failure of some brands (many Heartgard) where dogs that were dosed yearly still came up positive.  Do you see many of those cases?    



#39 Gary_and_Karen

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 08:38 PM

When you said "dosing yearly" did you one dose that lasts a year or dosing all year long ?

 

I completely agree with you.  I was just stating for people who do not want to dose their dogs at all, they don't have to.  But they obviously run the risk of their dog getting HW and then having to treat it.  Everyone has to make their own call.  If I lived in the south I would definitely be dosing yearly.  

 

Also, aren't many of the reactions listed on the Dr. Dodds page, also on the boxes for HW pills?  I don't think mine warns against death though... <_<

 

 

I completely agree with you.  I was just stating for people who do not want to dose their dogs at all, they don't have to.  But they obviously run the risk of their dog getting HW and then having to treat it.  Everyone has to make their own call.  If I lived in the south I would definitely be dosing yearly.  

 

Also, aren't many of the reactions listed on the Dr. Dodds page, also on the boxes for HW pills?  I don't think mine warns against death though... <_<


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#40 waffles

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 08:55 PM

I meant year round, meaning every month.  Right now, I dose from June until November because I am in NY where the climate just does not support mosquitoes year round.  In the south, every month of the year is what I would do if that is where I lived.  I suggest reading the link I posted.  HW should not be the biggest worry you have for your dog, even in the south.  It isn't an automatic death sentence-if you test yearly, you will catch it early and can treat it.    




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