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Looking for our first BC


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#1 Shelby Puppy

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 11:22 AM

Hello to the board. I am new here and My family and I are looking for a new member to add to our family. We live in Frederick, MD and we need help to find a nice breeder local. Please help if you can.

Thanks,

Mike

#2 dulcilama

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 12:22 PM

Hi, and welcome onboard. Assuming you've read the boards as there's loads of info on BCs on here and you know you've the time and space for these guys...it really is a new family member and they're always at least a step ahead of you too...

In the next couple of days most people are going to say rescue...many excellent older pups (6 months plus) end up there because people didn't do their homework right, and, after all, a small pup's only small such a short time and needs someone at home all the time. Many of these guys have basic training etc.

Think about it..

#3 KelliePup

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 06:21 PM

Welcome!

I'm gonna have to sheepishly say get a rescue as well. My Kellie is a rescue, and, aside from a few fixable issues, she's the best dog I've ever had. And she's only 18 mo old.

But if you're dead set on a breeder, go for working, not AKC. Others can elaborate and help you with that.
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#4 sandra s.

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 10:50 PM

Yes, rescue please
I have a rescue BC too, and I've never regretted it. Not for one day. Watching her change, watching that scared little tail come gradually out from between her legs and climb into the braggy flag position where it spends a lot of time these days...it's the best thing I've ever seen.

#5 Snorri the Priest

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 12:19 AM

Congratulations on a) deciding on a Border Collie as your new best friend, and :D signing up here!

I wasn't going to plunge right in and say "rescue", but I'll join the existing chorus!

Regrettably, it looks as though there may well be a fair number of BC boys and girls looking for a new roof soon :rolleyes: . You won't regret supplying one!

Be sensible about picking one - BCs who have spent their lives working stock may not take very well to an "indoor, family" life, being so used to the outdoor way (Unlike mine, who haven't the foggiest idea of what "work" is :eek: )

They are superb dogs (well, I would say that, wouldn't I? - but not without reason!) and will repay your kindness over and over again with loyalty, dedication and protectiveness. My family rescued one back in the fifties, and I still say that he repaid us by living to over 19 (we think) and being the best possible dog for a family with children. Kids can be very cruel without meaning to be - my Glen used to get his tail pulled, dressed up in silly clothes, and generally pestered, but none of us remember a bite or snap, ever. A true King amongst dogs!

Sorry, I'm in the UK and my US geography is not as good as perhaps it ought to be, so I'm unable to suggest a valid source near you, but I've an idea that the internet will be rife with "orphaned" BCs before long. And keep on coming here - the folks that use this board will come up with some possibilities, I've no doubt.

Best of luck with your collie-hunt; remember, they're probably hunting for you, too, but don't have the computer skills to ask!

Snorri

#6 Snorri the Priest

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 12:25 AM

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And damn' fine with children!

(This is my Snorri, trying to persuade my partner's grandson Josh to play ball. Until then, young Josh had never been this close to a dog - he was only 20 months old himself at the time)!

Now, I think little Snorri would lay down his life to save Josh from anything nasty!

Snorri

#7 dulcilama

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 12:45 AM

Great photo Snorri. You are right about working collies...when I got Fly (her fifth home by the age of three) she had never been in a house, never had children to deal with, was inadequately socialised (shed bred puppy by triallist)and was extremely nervous of most things.

My youngest was not quite three and pretty good with animals but likes to control them to the point of snapping on leads etc..At no point did Fly ever growl or snap at her. She will never be a family pet as she doesn't play with toys etc...but she comes in the house happily enough, eats indoors, rests in the day indoors, and I work her on my sheep. Without that I'm not sure what safe outlet she would have found for her mind.

I am trying agility with her on a friend's fullsize course - she will do a few jumps and the dog walk pretty well...but only because the five-bar gate back to the car up the track is the far side of the last jump!


OP, this is an extreme case - I had an entire background for this dog and I got her to work my sheep

#8 laurie etc

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 01:41 AM

Originally posted by hangman156000:
...I am new here and My family and I are looking for a new member to add to our family. We live in Frederick, MD and we need help to find a nice breeder local.
Mike

Hi Mike, This is a great place to start! You will learn a lot from reading through the posts on this board. 2 Questions- Why have you decided on a Border Collie? and, What are your plans for the dog?

#9 prosperia

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 05:36 AM

Just wanted to chime in and say rescue as well.
Here is a link to a list of BC rescues. Dont be to put off by distance. The rescue org.'s are really good at fitting you with the best dog for your family. Some may have restrictions such as a fenced yard, but I believe that if you stick with it there can be exceptions made.

Good luck!

http://www.netpets.c...ds/dogbdrc.html
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#10 Rebecca, Irena Farm

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 06:35 AM

There's a great rescue in Maryland and I think they have some Katrina dogs, if I'm not mistaken. That means they will also probably get on the list for Rita dogs, if any. :rolleyes:

http://www.mabcr.org/ These are GREAT people.

I always recommend rescue to those just starting out in Border collies. There's just so many variables and with a family's needs to consider it's important to get a dog that someone has verified is good in your specific type of home.

Some breeders will tell you anything to make a sale. It's really easy to get burned. It's best to go with someone you can trust - an organization you know has the interests of your family and the dog at heart.

Good luck!
Becca Shouse - Irena Farm, Semora, NC
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#11 Shelby Puppy

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 02:49 AM

What our breeds are the that are link the BC but not as active. As we are researching we are think we are not going to be able to give her what a BC needs. Please let me know. I am looking for a dog that is great at fetching frisbees but just as active.

#12 sandra s.

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 03:55 AM

What is it that you think you can't give her?
If it's just about EXTREME activity, then you could go asking at a rescue organisation about calm BCs available for rescue.
Not all BCs tear up the house if you don't throw the ball every minute of the day. Mine is a very nice example for a relatively peaceful BC.
What is extremely important to her is that she can be with me as much as possible. If time is what you can't give your dog, than you're probably right in looking for another breed.

Before other board members kill me: I'm not saying he should get a BC by all means and no matter what.
I just think that stories of ALL bcs being hyperactive and insane are so present on the internet these days that it probably scares off a lot of people who could provide a reasonably good home (and lots of love)for a not-so-hyper (rescue)BC.

I don't know how much you have researched, but I would recommend visiting a rescue center and talking to the people there. They will be able to tell you if a BC (maybe even one of theirs?) would fit into your life.

#13 prosperia

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 04:03 AM

Sandra's right, there are plenty of laid back BC's out there. You could consider rescuing an older dog. As for different breeds, labs and golden retriever's make really good family dogs.
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#14 Rebecca, Irena Farm

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 05:33 AM

Bless you! I can advise a couple things - check with the BC rescues anyway and see whether they can direct you to any lower-needs mixes. Best of both worlds can often be found - but you have to be careful, just because it's a mix doesn't ALWAYS mean the energy has been toned down!! Go with a place that fosters dogs or somewhere you can interact with the dog extensively before making a decision.

The other thing is check your local shelters and human societies. Yesterday we went on a hike and on the trail we kept passing and getting passed by a couple with a pair of terrific looking dogs. One was really neat, a red athletic shepherdy looking thing with a black mask and black blanket spot on the back. The other was an overweight Border collie mix. At one stopping place by the lake we passed them playing frisbee - the unidentifiable mixed breed was far the better player.

Take a toy with you and take some time to really interact with the dog (don't forget the dog will need some time to adjust to you, the fact that they are tasting freedom for what may have been days or weeks, and whatever trauma ended them up there). Remember that the vast amjority of shelter dogs are just lost or were abandoned by families who couldn't be bothered anymore. Most shelters screen dogs for adoptablity and keep families with small children in mind - ask about their dog adoptability screening policies.

Dogs that make great active family dogs - retriever mixes, some shepherd type mixes, hound/herding mixes, and most of the herding type mixes.

You can "shop" on petfinder.org - I did a search on Australian Shepherd mixes and got a ton of nice dogs. There's also this place I found: http://www.tails-of-hope.org/ if you go thtrough petfinder you'll see many more little shelters and orgs like this.

Good luck and please don't hesitate to come back with any questions - your decision makes you an "Honorary" Border collie person. :rolleyes:
Becca Shouse - Irena Farm, Semora, NC
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#15 Snorri the Priest

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 02:20 PM

Border Collies insane and hyperactive? Please don't tell my pair, or they'll think they're missing something, and start trying to live up to it! Then I won't get any more of this:
Posted Image
and I'll have to stand up and DO something!

Laid back, or what?

Snorri
:rolleyes:

#16 karrie

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 02:59 PM

Well, have to say my Sam is laid back althou he likes to herd mice ( when he finds one which isn't often thankfully) and kill Gavin's skateboard ( apparently, Mr. Gavin didn't obey his mother and now all Sam has to do is see that thing and moving or not it must be destroyed.) Hey, what can the boy expect when I've caught him slowly rolling it so Sam will attack it. Now I get the pleasure of redirecting. The volleyball is working so far but I have to say Sam is a great dog~ he listens ( has some distractions but whistle or call again and boom here he is). He does have springs for back legs thou. But other than that his is a really laid back guy, more so than my white lab/golden retriver mix. Now I did get him from a breeder but she matched him to me and my family ~ my house isn't for the timid and my older dog will not accept any bucking her authority ( and she as a rule doesn't care for adult dogs). Beware of Backyard Breeders if you go that route. On these boards, I've seen some wonderful rescue dogs ( grrr could have taken them in a heartbeat if not for my older dog and ~sighs~ dh.).

#17 Columbia MO

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 04:16 PM

Somebody mentioned Labs & Goldens as good family dogs. As a former dog behaviorist who has had over 1000 dogs in my classes, I would definitely give a thumbs up for the Golden. Some lines have developed fear aggression recently, but a Golden is still a relatively safe bet for a family pet.

I definitely do NOT recommend a Lab for most people. Goldens and Labs are absolutely and totally different personalities. The only thing they have in common other than being popular yellow bird dogs is the fact that both breeds tend to have horrible manners with other dogs and can basically only play with other Labs or Goldens. (That's another story).

In an informal poll of dog behaviorists, they overwhelmingly voted Labs among the worst family dogs and one of the worst breeds for a first-time dog owner. MOST Labs (not all, but most) are extremely dominant, pushy, attention-seeking and demanding. Labs rank #1 of all breeds in pulling on leash and jumping on people. They are very high energy, and are one of the most destructive breeds when left alone at home.

I have also had numerous Labs over the past few years that arrived in class extremely dog aggressive. (Lunging/snarling). The dominance problems with owners are also getting worse. I worked with a Lab who had disembowled his owner when she tried to block him from going out the door ahead of her.

I will let my dogs play with all kinds of dogs, including the bull breeds. The only breed I absolutely won't allow to get near any of my dogs is a Lab. Labs can pretty much turn any dog they meet fear aggressive through their rough body-slamming play style and inability to give off or read calming signals from other dogs. There are plenty of exceptions out there, but they are generally NOT a good family breed. They are good dogs for people with lots of training experience and leadership ability, who are home all the time, and want a very active bird dog and don't mind spending a few hours a day working on the jumping, and don't mind walking the dog in a Gentle Leader for life!

Just my $0.02 cents.

If the OP wants a nice dog for playing frisbee with, I'll add my vote for an adult rescue BC or BC mix. I have a show-bred BC that is extremely well mannered in the house and absolutely undemanding. If you want to play ball, frisbee, or do any sports, he instantly turns on and will play for hours. But when I had knee surgery and was housebound for a few weeks, he just slept all day, every day without so much as even a walk. I can't say the same for my new herding-bred puppy. He brings tennis balls about 500 times a day and needs about 5 miles of running a day just to take the edge off! There are similar examples of hyper show-bred BCs and laid back herding bred ones. The best thing to do is check out adults in rescue and find one that fits your requirements.

Good luck!

Columbia, MO

#18 WWBC

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 04:26 PM

Labs and very active bird dog in the same sentence? I believe that there are some active bird dogs that are Labs, but the majority of the ones that people end up buying as pets are not of the active bird dog variety. More like the BYB variety, which would also account for many of the other problems that are seen with the Labs the general public have as pets. JMO

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#19 Annette Carter & the Borderbratz

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 04:37 PM

Both my herding bred BCs have a definite off switch and could handle me being housebound for weeks on end and I know that Columbia mentioned that glued to the ceiling and laid back dogs can happen in either herding or show bred dogs but I want to add that with my rescue I got lucky with her temperament because I got her directly while she was on the way to the shelter and had no one with experience evaluate her for me and with my herding bred dog, I found a good breeder who knew her stuff and gave her a long list of what I wanted in a dog -off switch included, and she delivered. So either way rescue or breeder, it's important to know what you want and find someone you can trust to evaluate dogs and deliver as close to an ideal as they can for you.

#20 prosperia

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 06:47 PM

hmmm, maybe the labs in your area are a bit different than those around here. The ones I know are are basically goofy "Duh, which way did he go george" type personalities. Not the brightest bulb in the bunch, but very easy going.
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