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Possible Texas hurricane


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#1 Miztiki

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 05:49 AM

Emily is still a long way out, but there's a reasonable chance that it will hit Texas or bring alot of rain. Since our house is old and we are in a flood zone, I'd like to prepare.

Regarding the dogs, what sorts of things should I think about besides water and food? Speaking of food, if we got a direct hit and lots of people lost power, we could probably get some raw pretty cheap!

Anyway, just wondered what I should think about both during (wind) and after (flood/power) the event. Thanks!

#2 muggs

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:01 AM

Batteries, cash, gas in the cars beforehand, bottled water (lots for dogs), manual can opener, non perishable food for you and dogs. Charge up your cell phones before the storm. Since you're in a flood zone, it'b be extremely beneficial to have a boat/canoe! Could even be a raft. If that's not possible, try to find out if neighbors have one and let them know you don't. Water rises fast - ask the people in eastern NC who survived Floyd. So get out if it even starts to look like your area is flooding.
Margaret
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#3 Nik

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:04 AM

Miz I know you haven't lived in TX all of your life so the question comes to mind..have you ever been through a hurricane before?

TS Cindy hit us directly a couple of weeks ago and we barely missed Dennis by the skin of our teeth but got some of the TS force winds off of it too (although not the strong ones). Best thing to do if you can afford it is get yourself a generator for power loss. Board the windows up and hang on to your socks as far as the wind goes. If it looks like Emily will hit you directly and you don't feel safe enough to ride it out...get out in plenty of time.

Don't know how it is in other Gulf Coast States but in MS EVERYTHING seems to go up in price a few days before something like a hurricane...including food. Not enough to officially name it "price gouging" mind you but enough to hurt the pocket book in a hurry.

Three days before Dennis was expected to make landfall, gas was at 2.03/gal. Two days before jumped up .10. The day before it was up to 2.23/gal. I know we have some of the cheapest prices in gas but thats still alot when compared to our cost of living too.

Main thing is STAY SAFE!! But I do admit..I'M a chicken when it comes to bad weather...especially wind.

And all those extras that Muggs added to the list.
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#4 juliepoudrier

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:14 AM

I second the part about water rising fast. Also keep in mind that most (if not all) emergency shelters will NOT take pets. One of the worst sights rescue workers talked about after Floyd was dogs tied in yards with no way to escape as flood waters rose. So don't take chances and wait till the last minute. If it looks like it's going to get bad, get out soonest so you have control over where you go (which means being able to take your dogs with you). If you need the boat, then it's already too late and your dogs will be at the mercy of rescue workers, who, bless them, do all they can, but have to save humans....

After Floyd we were cut off from everything else for several days because flooding washed out bridges, causing road closures. Fortunately, that was the worst effect of the flooding. For Isabel, I packed everything up in my van (dogs, cats, chickens--yes I looked like a modern version of the Beverly Hillbillys--and headed west to my sister's place in central NC [sorta near Becca]).

For wind, make sure that all items that can blow, including trash cans, lawn furniture, etc, are either secured or put away in a building. This includes things like chain-link dog kennels--they may seem heavy to you, but trust me they will blow in the wind. Cargo straps and metals tie down screws work for securing things like kennels and sheds. Plywood over your house windows will prevent breakage from flying debris, tree limbs, etc.

If you have problems with trees coming down on power lines (assuming your power doesn't run under ground), then plan on filling all your bathtubs with water--you can drink bottled water, but will want the water in the tub for washing up and flushing the toilet. Remember that without electricity, pumps won't work, so you won't get water from a well (and if there's serious flooding then water from your well,or even a municipal system, would probably be unsafe to drink).

In addition to the items Muggs listed above, I always keep kerosene lamps handy and lamp oil for them. Safer than candles and longer-lasting than batteries.

A battery-powered radio is nice so you can get information even when the power is out. And it's also nice to have an old fashioned phone (not the kind with the handset, but the kind that doesn't require a power outlet) so that you can have phone service even if the power is out (many phone lines are underground and would not be affected by falling trees). You can get them pretty cheap and it removes the necessity of recharging cell phone batteries or dealing with cell towers being out because of the storm.

Some people go out and get generators so they can run refrigerators and stuff like that. That's an expensive option, and I probably wouldn't use it unless I was in a very hurricane prone area.

The funny thing is that since moving away from Elizabeth City near the NC coast, I find myself not paying nearly as much attention to hurricanes....

J.

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#5 jazzysmom

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:16 AM

Here's a few things I would add.

If you have a grill it would be a good idea to stock up on charcoal/gas. We have a gas grill with a side burner and we have crawfish boilers. (Propane burners)They can be used to boil water if needed.
If you have an electric water heater you will really appreciate taking a warm bath.
We went without power for 8 days when hurricane Andrew hit Morgan City.

Disposable cups/ paper plates.

A battery operated tv is a good thing to have. You can pick them up pretty cheap now.

Make sure your homeowners insurance papers (and any other important papers) are handy and in a safe place. Preferably, in something sealed so they can't get wet.

Most of all stay safe.

#6 Miztiki

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:18 AM

I've lived in TX for just over a year now. I was living in extreme north Georgia when hurricane Opal came through. At that point it was probably a tropical storm (don't remember). It was scary though! We lost a good section of roof off the barn and lost a few trees. Mickey didn't like storms and was glued to me the whole time. It felt like it lasted forever.

That's my only experience with a hurricane.

Last year people warned me about the displaced snakes and the floating fire ant balls. :eek:

#7 muggs

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:21 AM

Floating fire ant balls??!! OK I change my advice, get out if it starts sprinkling.
Margaret
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Levi ('87 - '05)

#8 Nik

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:25 AM

Floating fire ant balls??!! OK I change my advice, get out if it starts sprinkling.

LMAO!

Oh yeh Miz...you probably already have one handy but just in case, a first aid kit is a good idea.
Nicki

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#9 -Jess-

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:37 AM

Miz, just wanted to say stay safe! Since I am up in East TX, I probably will not be affected too much, unless tornados develope.

I was in Hurricane claudette while at our beach house on the TX coast -- we got trapped, because they closed the main roads due to flooding, and the ferrys were shut down. Our beach house swayed in the wind like it was standing on tooth pics Scariest thing was watching the balls on the pool table roll from side to side!

#10 INU

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:41 AM

I really hope not!
Houston SPCA just accepted 250 animals from Louisiana area to shelter them temporarily... what would happen to them!? we'd have to forward them to the west..

#11 Maralynn

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:59 AM

I hope it does'nt get too bad for you there - but it is very wise to be prepared.

Here's a list that the Red Cross has put togetherDisaster Supplies Kit
and a press release they put together on Hurricane Preparedness

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#12 Kitch

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 07:27 AM

Remember to keep updated photos of your dogs handy as well as tags on them at all times. They should also have a friend/relative's number that doesn't live nearby on their tags. That way, if you are separated and your area is badly hit, the friend can be contacted (as you most likely won't be home).

FEMA has some really great information on their website as well as publications they can send you. All FEMA produced publications are free to individuals (I think the limit is 3 of each publication to one individual, but it might only be 1 of *each* publication). Most can also be downloaded for free if your internet connection is good enough. I have included some of the links below:

Water Damage Defense Info 
http://www.waterdama...cy-preparedness

Hurricane Info
http://www.fema.gov/...hurricanes.shtm

Animals and emergencies
http://www.fema.gov/...ary/anemer.shtm

FEMA also has a ton of information in their independent study courses (most available on line or they will mail them to you). Anyone can sign up to take the classes - again, they are free and provide some good handy reference material.

A big push in the last few years is planning for animals in disasters, both pets and livestock. In the past, the emphasis has always been on 'just get the people out, we'll come back later for the animals if we have time". Emergency planners have finally realized that many people won't leave their animals, so planning for the animals as well actually saves human lives too.

Can you tell I used to work with FEMA?

Also, I can't emphasize this enough: anyone in a floodplain or even in an area that may be outside a mapped floodplain but still floods do to poor drainage or poor urban planning SHOULD HAVE FLOOD INSURANCE Your homeowner policy does not cover flood damage You need to buy this insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) which is run by FEMA. Anyone can buy this insurance, even if you live on top of a mountain in the desert. I can't tell you how many people I have talked to that lost everything in a flood and didn't realize that their homeowner's insurance wouldn't cover them until it was too late....

Okay, off my soapbox now.



#13 Miztiki

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 07:56 AM

We are required to have flood insurance, so we're covered there.

My husband just ordered new replacement windows for the house, so if we do get hit by Emily, at least we'll have new windows! :rolleyes:

All photos of dogs are digital, so I'll be sure that there are lots of good pictures available online so I can download them if needed.

Thanks for the links and all the advice. I'm reading and learning about hurricanes and how to prepare. Emily is a long ways off and who knows where she'll go, but I figure it's better to learn and prepare now, even for a future one, than wait til it's too late.

My husband freaks over thunderstorms. I can't imagine how he would do in a hurricane or tornado. I would have to give him Fynne's valium!

#14 Kitch

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 08:24 AM

Just make sure you already have some printed out...if you do get hit and lose power, it'll be too late to print them out then. :rolleyes:

It is great that you are preparing ahead of time. Here's hoping you don't need to implement any of your plans!

#15 Kitch

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 08:35 AM

Oh yeah...don't remember if anyone mentioned this yet, but you will want to have a good supply of any/all medications the dogs (and people) are on.

Random other things: handiwipes or the waterless bath wipes, first aid stuff, pepto bismal (or similar, for humans as well as dogs), first aid kit, all important papers, insurance phone number, blanket from bed or t-shirt from hamper: to bring with you if you have to relocate somewhere to keep the dogs calm.

I would call your town officials as well and ask for a copy of the emergency plan (they are supposed to let you see it)or at least the names/locations of evacuation shelters that allow pets, as some shelter do but they may be farther away. As a back-up, find out which hotels (in the direction you would be evacuating to) allow pets.

Okay, I'll stop now....you just had me remembering my Emergency Management days...
Kerry
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#16 jazzysmom

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 09:10 AM

Forgot to add make sure you have plenty of matches and or lighters.

#17 nancy

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 09:37 AM

Even if your utilites are underground, you can sure lose power and telephone. Those wires come up someplace, and that's where the trees will fall. Also, transformers blow. So expect to be without power.

We fill all the plastic jugs and bottles we have with drinking water and fill the bathtub. I move all the stuff around in my 2 fridges and big freezer so I can get a weeks worth of food into the inside fridge freezer - hot dogs, hamburgers, cutlets, steaks.... I also move around stuff in the two fridges to have the outside on as stuffed as possible and just what I'll need in the inside one. Anything we can cook on the grill or propane stove. That way, I don't have to ever open the other two units and have not lost any food through hurricanes, severe thunderstorms, snow, and the evil ice storm.

We have at least on full propane tank on the grill and one full spare. We also have small propane tanks for the camping stove and lantern - and an adapter to use a big tank. We get good batteries in the flashlights and radios. I get out my stockpile of candle stubs - eapecially the ones from Advent - there's always a good-sized one from the last Sunday.

Then we bring in everything from outside - the porch furniture, the plants (they go on old showercurtains in the den), the bird feeders, and my clothline pole (they are not easy to replace in these days when no one else seems to use the sun for their laundry). We get both Hondas and the MG into the 2-car garage, put the canoe on top of the MG, and bring in the trash carts.

When we actually do all that, the storm passes us. When we don't, we get creamed. Of course, we seem to lose power no matter what.

Good luck! Remember, Baymont Inns and Suites takes pets of all sizes. I think Red Roof Inn, La Quinta, and Days Inns do too. Check these sites, too:
http://www.dogfriendly.com/
http://www.petswelcome.com./

#18 BigD

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 09:39 AM

Hi Miz - as we are basically living on a target out in the middle of the Pacific we have had to make sure we are ready for hurricanes (which I think are easier to deal with than tornados!).

All the stuff above is great.

One thing - does you house have hurricane clips on the roof? We put them on ours and I do feel a bit better. I think you can also buy straps that go over your roof and are staked into the ground. Our house is built up off the ground about 18" so if we are going to go, it's going to be more than just the roof!

This is also a good time to stock up on camp food and the camp stove that I told you about before you took your road trip. It lasts for years and does really taste damn good. You can also buy a water purification system for camping as well. All of this stuff we have on our emergency kit - but we use for camping all the time. Those camp stoves can boil water in seconds and you can have a very nutritous hot meal in minutes.

Denise

#19 Kitch

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 09:49 AM

Hurricane clips/straps are relatively cheap and great (and really easy to install, even more so when building the house)...one thing we would always see though is people who only strapped down their roof....in many cases, the roof would technically stay on - but then the whole second floor would blow off...ideally, you need to clip the roof to the second floor, the second floor to the first and the first to the basement. In any case, some clips are better than nothing.


Another interesting factoid: a foot of water moving at 4 mph has the same power/force as a 100mph wind. Never underestimate the power of water or think that it may be safe/easy to cross because it isn't moving very fast or doesn't look too deep...

#20 Miztiki

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 01:33 PM

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Wow. Houston had some widespread flash flooding this afternoon from some strong storms and there is another storm system heading our way.

There's a small neighborhood that is still underwater in Houston. There were a few vehicles floating in the roads downtown too.

More rain on the way and now they say that Emily turned north slightly and some models are predicting a TX gulf hit. Goody.

I won't be on the boards much tonight, got a few things I need to do. :rolleyes:



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