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whistle materials and spit


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#1 rushdoggie

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Posted 07 February 2018 - 01:05 AM

So I need to embrace my whistle and get proficient with it. I have a plastic whistle, and can use it for a bit but after just a few minutes I end up with too much saliva and it wants to move around.

 

When it moves I can't get the sounds the way I want.

 

Would I get better results from metal or corian?


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#2 Riika

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Posted 07 February 2018 - 04:16 PM

I dunno. I have a metal one, and it gets full of slobber and wants to fly out, or it drips out, or it makes the sound bubbly. I figured it was just because I'm just trying to figure out how to use it, and that it'll stop once I get the hang of it.


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#3 Sue R

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Posted 07 February 2018 - 09:00 PM

I think that whistle shape and material is a personal choice - there is no *one* right answer for everyone but hopefully there is *a* right answer for you. Some vendors may allow a trial period, which sounds pretty icky unless you trust them to sterilize any returned whistles. If you are able to go to a trial where there is a vendor, they may let you "test drive" one or more styles.

It can get pretty pricy buying and trying, and then buying and trying again!
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#4 Smalahundur

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 04:42 AM

After trying several whistles (didn't invest too much though) I drew the conclusion that whistling on my fingers is far superior to those shepherd whistles.
No spit trouble, way more volume, can't forget them at home or loose them( barring horrible accidents...).
Only possible drawback is you sometimes stick fingers in your mouth and thén remember just lifting a very dirty horse hoove moments before....

"Milli manns og hests og hunds hangir leyniþráður"


#5 rushdoggie

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 11:58 PM

I can't make noises that way though...

 

I just realized theres slightly different shapes, I may try another shape to see if its less likely to slip around


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#6 Smalahundur

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 07:13 AM

I can't make noises that way though...
 

I thought so too, tried to learn it as a kid, but never got it to work, blamed my slightly crooked front teeth.
Until I got into bordercollies, and talked to my wife how practical fingre whistling would be. She said everybody can learn to do that, and proceeded to teach me succesfully :)
I was over 40 years old when I "got it", so I would say if you are really interested in acquiring this skill I am sure you could do it.
It is very usefull, not only on dogs, people also respond very well to such a piercing whistle over distances you couldn't shout.

"Milli manns og hests og hunds hangir leyniþráður"



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