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I have friends who need their dogs on planes. I had friends who cheated.


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#1 Donald McCaig

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 07:35 AM

https://www.nytimes....WT.nav=top-news



#2 Jexa

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 02:35 PM

Falsely claiming a service dog irritates me so much simply because it undermines those who ACTUALLY need a service dog. It is incredible what a true service dog can do. They and their handlers don't deserve to have to put up with this BS brought about by liars and their ill behaved dogs.

Unfortunately most businesses are hesitant to kick out false service dogs for fear of negative backlash in the social media age. They are only allowed to ask if the dog performs a task that aids the handler's disability. Per the law, however, ANY dog who is misbehaving can be legally kicked out regardless of what the owner claims. I wish more businesses had the gumption to do so, to preserve goodwill for those who need a legitimate service dog.

#3 gcv-border

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 04:25 PM

I watched a news segment that addressed this issue. It mirrored the NYT article, but also noted that the new 'requirements' should not be too onerous on legitimate Service Animals/ESAs as they should already have the documentation. The reporter also demonstrated how easy it is to get a letter 'signed' by a mental health professional - there is an online service that takes less than 5 minutes to get the letter.


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#4 aschlemm

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 08:09 PM

Over the summer I was in a Weis grocery store and saw a man entering with a lizard on his shoulder.  It was completely unrestrained, no collar, leash or harness.  He went with the lizard to the produce area.  When I was checking out I mentioned this to the clerk.  She said "Oh, I know who you mean, it's an emotional support animal, we received a notice last week that even if someone comes in with a snake, if it is an emotional support animal, we have to allow it."  I asked, "What about salmonella?  Reptiles naturally harbor salmonella.  The lizard is unrestrained, what is stopping it from jumping into the produce and spreading salmonella?"  They just gave me a look and then said that they didn't like it either.  I like lizards, actually, I thought it was cute, just not in the grocery store.  When I got home I got on the Weis website and sent in a complaint, along with an article on salmonella in reptiles but I never heard back. 



#5 D'Elle

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 03:02 PM

Doesn't seem to me that it is extreme, as the article says some are saying, to request heath documentation online prior to the flight.  If a human passenger needs special attention, like help boarding or a wheelchair, it is required that they notify online prior to the flight. Seems to me essentially the same kind of thing.

 

It also wouldn't seem the least bit unreasonable to require that the animal be on some sort of restraining device, collar or harness, or if a snake then in a carrier.

 

Service dogs are on leash all the time when in public; it is part of the communication system between the dog and the handler.

 

I think emotional support animals should have exactly the same privileges as service animals, because what they do is every bit as important. But having them well trained, well behaved, and on leash or otherwise controllable is by no means too much to ask, nor is verification of rabies vaccination.  How to assure that they are well behaved before getting on a flight? Not so easy.

 

Sugar gliders are not opossums as the article says. Different species. Being such tiny pocket-size animals it seems to me it would be easy to take one on board and no one be the wiser.

 

It is not really that easy to catch salmonella from a reptile, although I do agree with the sentiment that they should be restrained and in control at all times in a public place, for their safety as well as others'.


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#6 Petes Mom

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 10:32 AM

This was all before the Dexter the Peacock incident.  Now, things are going to get really tough, getting your dog on board in the cabin.



#7 gcv-border

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 02:15 PM

This was all before the Dexter the Peacock incident.  Now, things are going to get really tough, getting your dog on board in the cabin.

Is it true that the airline told the owner several times PRIOR TO the flight date, that the peacock would not be allowed to fly as an ESA (or whatever the owner was calling him)?  And yet, the owner showed up, with peacock in tow, to fly anyway?


Jovi

"Folks will know how large your soul is by the way you treat a dog."  Charles F. Duran


#8 Donald McCaig

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 08:52 AM

https://www.nytimes....ol-right-region



#9 Donald McCaig

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 08:52 AM

https://www.nytimes....ol-right-region



#10 Carol Lea Benjamin

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Posted 06 February 2018 - 11:05 AM

When people see dogs in places where dogs are not allowed unless they are helping their human partner, they are quick to note reasons why the dog is not a real service dog.  I would suggest they look not only at the dog, but also at the human.  When working with a service dog partner, part of your attention is always on the dog - as his or hers is on you.  It's not the size of the dog in the vest but the relationship between dog and handler that counts.  It's visible. You know it when you see it at a trial or on a farm.  it's not hard to recognize on a plane or at the bank or anywhere else pets are not allowed and people are inspired to cheat. Service dogs are not perfect. But for the most part, they tend to be unobtrusive and because they are trained to focus on their person, they are always aware of when they are needed and know precisely what to do about that.

 

People who cheat with untrained dogs, snakes, beavers or even peacocks are making things more difficult for people who already have a more difficult time because of some disability.  It's sad that after things got better and better for those of us navigating the world with genuine service dogs that now, once again, we are getting screamed at and being told we are gaming the system. I, for one, am delighted the airlines are backtracking on their comfort animal policy.  I have all the credentials I need to get on a plane and my dog can go through the metal detector naked so that there's no buckle or leash clip to make it ding.  More than that, lovely as they are from a distance, I have no desire to share an armrest with a peacock or to find out that the person sitting next to me has one of those comfort spiders I keep hearing about.  



#11 aschlemm

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Posted 07 February 2018 - 07:42 PM

Don't forget the Emotional Support Lizard.  I know I won't.  Each time I go to the Weis and see the salad bar I picture that lizard dancing a jig in it and I think "Nah, I'll pass on salad!"



#12 terrecar

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 08:41 PM

http://cbsloc.al/2C4XWhi

Then there is the woman who flushed her emotional support hamster down the toilet at BWI when Spirit Airlines wouldn’t allow her to board with it.

#13 GentleLake

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Posted Yesterday, 11:03 AM

I think we may be reaching a tipping point where something will finally be done.

 

https://www.cbsnews....light-man-says/

 

Unfortunately, this article doesn't give any specifics about whether this dog was actually an emotional support animal or service dog, though it suggests the former.

 

Other outlets refer to the dog as a service dog. https://www.abcactio...ng-to-passenger


"People in your life always come and go all the time; the dogs are always there for me. Always." ~Samantha Valle



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