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Another needless dog attack


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#21 JohnLloydJones

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 07:49 PM

Yes! Thank you for the example I love these even if your dog is friendly to keep your dog safe and to avoid putting them in a stressful situation.

The boy in the photo is Cash and the harness and tags are for a purpose. If strange ladies (but not men) come up to him and thrust their hand in his face, he will nip. The harness makes him look important and has an interesting effect on him; he knows he must be on best behaviour when in "uniform".



#22 Liz P

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 07:50 PM

That doesn't stop people.  I had a fear aggressive dog and was living in an apartment, so leash walking was my only choice.  I put a muzzle on him to try to deter people from coming near me.  He would not bite, but I was hoping the visual cue would stop people from getting close and scaring him.  (He has severe PTSD after being attacked by loose dogs.)  Nope.  Plenty of idiots tried to come over, insisting they or their dogs were friendly and could help rehab my dog.  :angry:



#23 JohnLloydJones

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 08:20 PM

That doesn't stop people.

The general public are clueless about interacting with dogs, but my experience with Cash is that his harness really does help.

[ Cash is not fear aggressive. His nipping was a "keep your hands off me, lady" reaction. ]



#24 D'Elle

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 09:33 AM

I have been known simply to be rude to people when walking a dog I know to be iffy or very fearful. Put out my hand in a "stop!" gesture, and say in a loud voice

"Don 't come near this dog!"

Accompanied by a severe scowl, that will keep even the most idiotic people away.

But I prefer just to cross the street, if I can. That is not always an option, but I can always move out of the way to let them go by, while holding the dog close to me. I have been fortunate enough never to have owned an iffy or biting dog, but have known some who were and occasionally took care of them


D'Elle

and family.

Left to right: Kit, Jester, Boo, Digger

 

 

Mydogs12-2013Smaller.jpg
"You gonna throw that?" --Jester:  2001 - June 24 2016. Remembered with much love.
"I'm grouchier than you are" --Kit

"I love everyone!" -- Boo

(Boing! Boing! Boing!)--Digger

And not pictured, Benjamin the cat, who thinks he is a small border collie with superpowers.

 

 

 


#25 Tommy Coyote

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 10:01 AM

Another awful attack hit the news yesterday.  A woman had adopted a pit apparently from a rescue.  She was just letting it meet her friend's dog.  It attacked and killed the dog and  both women were injured.

 

I wonder how much of this is due to the huge hue and cry from pit owners that pits are just misunderstood.  They are really sweet and gentle.  They are victims of bad press.  It is all the owner's fault because the dogs were not raised right or the dogs were raised to be aggressive.  I have heard that argument over and over and over.  But then it hits the news that two pits who never showed any previous tendency toward aggression just attacked and killed a grandchild.

 

A lot of these dogs are really nice.  But people that own them need to be aware of their potential for aggressiveness - especially dog aggressiveness and should take that into consideration when they have the dogs out in public.  They seem to attack and kill or injure a lot more dogs than they do people.

 

I know there are zillions of these dogs out there.  There are a ton of them just in my neighborhood.  And only about 50 fatal attacks on humans each year.  God knows, that is bad enough but when you consider the total number of dogs the percentage is really low.  Unfortunately, when they do snap it is catastrophic.  I wonder if there is predisposition in this breed for rage syndrome.  That doesn't explain the cases where two or more dogs attack.

 

But according to my neighbors who own 2 pits these are just the most loyal, loving dogs on the face of the planet.



#26 terrecar

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 10:43 AM

Tommy Coyote says: "But according to my neighbors who own 2 pits these are just the most loyal, loving dogs on the face of the planet."

They are... Until they're not.

#27 Creiglowlady

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 11:46 AM

I was told by my vet to not buy dogs from people that won't let you meet the dam and sir or see their living conditions. She says quote that if you breed an aggressive dog chances are you are going to get an aggressive dog it's not always how you train though it makes obviously a big difference it is what their genetic characteristics are

#28 simba

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 03:23 PM

Can we get rid of this idea that dogs need to meet and be friends, you can and should pet every dog you meet, or that you have the right to let your dog over to every other dog?

 

I was at a busy dog event with my two, everyone was doing fine, they were at one stage lying asleep under a tree in the middle of a crowd of people and dogs sitting down. When other dogs barked or freaked out, they just looked at me for guidance.

 

But one person's dog, for whatever reason, just spooked them a little. It was choking itself straining at the end of the lead to get to all the other dogs and it may have been the grunting choking noise that was worrying them.

 

So I looked around, saw what was worrying them, and moved out of the way. The woman and her dog approached us. I walked rapidly backwards saying "Oh sorry, we're not saying hello today, could you give us some space please, excuse me, please  give me some space, no seriously back off, stop following me, what the fuck is wrong with you Jesus Christ!"

 

Yes, it was all one sentence. All while holding out my hand in a 'stop' signal and backing away with my dogs. So even if she was deaf, there was no excuse.

 

She, meanwhile, chased us through the crowd with her manic dog saying "Oh, go say hello to the dog, go say hello!"

 

At this point we were backed up against a concrete wall and my dogs were sitting behind me. The more nervous dog decided that obviously this wasn't working as an approach and jumped out and snarled and barked. In fairness to her, her approach worked better than mine. The woman pulled back her dog, stood there for a moment staring at us, and walked off. I cursed at her again as she left. I'm not normally one for swearing, but there are times it just seems necessary.

 

Be careful about 'pits' attacking people on the news- if it's a labrador that attacks someone, it sounds a bit better if it's a 'pit' .

 

So many of these things just seem stupidly avoidable. I have terriers. If I had recently adopted a terrier, and was bringing it to another dog's house, when that dog is elderly, I would muzzle it or introduce first in a neutral situation. Dogs are dangerous, or have the potential to be so. So you exercise basic caution. If you can't hold your dog and it's sometimes aggressive, you muzzle it.



#29 Creiglowlady

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 03:31 PM

Oh my Simba what a horrible situation I would be livid! People have no common sense that could have turned dangerous and resulted in all of you getting hurt if your dog decided it needed to protect you guys while sensing your being uncomfortable.

#30 Liz P

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 08:38 PM

"But then it hits the news that two pits who never showed any previous tendency toward aggression just attacked and killed a grandchild."

 

No signs of aggression that the owners recognized.  So often, most owners completely fail to recognize the clear signals their dogs are giving.  It's rare for me to meet people who can genuinely read dog behavior.

 

Sure, most of these dogs are not Am Staffs, but many are bully breed mixes.  Generally the Kansas City area shelters label bull breed crosses as Lab mixes to make them easier to adopt.  Some of the local towns actually have breed bans in place.  Other owners want Lab mix listed on the official paperwork because their homeowners insurance won't cover any bully breeds.

 

Most of the bully cross dogs seem pretty amicable.  However, the ones who are aggressive are downright terrifying.  When they commit to biting it's dead serious.

 

I think you are up against the issue of 1) high drive plus 2) poor impulse control and 3) extreme determination.  They were bred to be tough, "gamey" dogs and they do have a very different style of fighting than most other breeds.  Obviously, each individual dog is different.  Just talking breed tendencies here (like saying BCs tend to want to chase moving objects).



#31 terrecar

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 09:16 AM

I have to defend journalists here. I hear so many 'fur baby' advocates (and that isn't directed to anyone here) lamenting the media portrayal of certain breeds, but it seems to me a good percentage of these advocates are lifting their talking points from the Donald Trump manual of media management. You can find just as many knee-jerk justifications in the media for certain 'unfairly maligned' breeds.

 

I don't doubt sensationalism and misidentification occur, but judging from the multiple reports I've seen, they occur considerably less frequently than the accusations imply. One should always vet their sources and corroborate stories, but I think in general that (actual) journalists do the best they can to report accurately.

 

After so many years of being maligned for sensationalism and misidentification, journalists who report these attacks are getting smart. The breed or breed type is supplied, but often with the source of that information provided. Many times it is the offending dog's owner who identifies the breed or type. Also, news outlets are posting photos of the attacking dog or dogs (cue "nobody can identify a breed x").



#32 Alchemist

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 03:50 PM

Can we get rid of this idea that dogs need to meet and be friends, you can and should pet every dog you meet, or that you have the right to let your dog over to every other dog?

 

Amen to that!

 

My dogs come with me to work each day (I work at a large university). There's a strict leash law on campus. I'm good with that. The other day we were walking in from the parking lot, the three dogs walking nicely on leash, when suddenly a small Westie, off leash, comes roaring up to us, growling and yapping its fool head off. We stop, and I look around for the owner, preparing to boot the terrier to the other end of campus. Then I see a woman come running up. "Are your dogs friendly?" she says.

 

Well. HERS clearly isn't. My dogs are giving it the "WTF??!?!" look, not sure how to react. I simply told her to leash her dog, and then explained that you should NEVER let a dog off-leash approach dogs on-leash.

 

Of course, two days later, we ran into her again - her dog still off-leash.

 

Too many dog owners are idiots, purely and simply.



#33 Liz P

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 04:32 PM

I now take a photo of the offending dogs and their human. I then inform said human to leash their dog before I call the police. It's the closest I've found to a reliable method of getting people to actually listen and obey the law. I started this after being knocked over multiple times by loose dogs on the bike trail.

#34 Liz P

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 04:34 PM

PS, new neighbor's weiner dog dug under the fence and got into my yard. My dogs couldn't decide what they were supposed to do with it; herd it like a cat or invite it to play ball. Owner is very lucky my dogs are not aggressive.

#35 Alchemist

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 08:05 PM

Liz, what a grand idea!!! I'm absolutely doing this next time. I'm also informing the owner that I'm submitting the photo to campus police.

 

Tired of idiot dog owners...

 

I now take a photo of the offending dogs and their human. I then inform said human to leash their dog before I call the police. It's the closest I've found to a reliable method of getting people to actually listen and obey the law. I started this after being knocked over multiple times by loose dogs on the bike trail.



#36 Tommy Coyote

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 07:18 AM

My dogs were playing tug of war with a yorkie thst came in that came in under my fence. Fortunately for the yorkie, I was right there.

#37 terrecar

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 08:09 AM

The problem with off-leash dogs is that so many people are 100% sure that their dog will not harm a fly up until the very instant the dog 'breaks character' and attacks another dog; or worse, a child. I know there are people who do have their dogs trained to a high degree. The problem is, most don't. I would much rather have a leash culture in place to deal with the ones who don't. Idiot dog owners ruin it for everyone.



#38 Tommy Coyote

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 09:58 AM

http://www.dogsbite.org/?gclid=CNv5rpKL6NMCJQEGaQod3cqACwQ 

 

This site has a whole lot of information on dog attack statistics.  It advocates for the victims.  

 

This is scary stuff but I do think people need to be aware of the facts so that they can take appropriate action to protect themselves, their families and their dogs from attacks.



#39 Creiglowlady

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 03:03 PM

http://www.dogsbite.org/?gclid=CNv5rpKL6NMCJQEGaQod3cqACwQ 
 
This site has a whole lot of information on dog attack statistics.  It advocates for the victims.  
 
This is scary stuff but I do think people need to be aware of the facts so that they can take appropriate action to protect themselves, their families and their dogs from attacks.


This is great info. I like how it has a description for most cases and what percentage of attacks were to the known breed. Reading through it is horrific but it is the reality of the situation. It's horrify that most cases are small children and family pets.
My husbands mother has a pit bull that they raised from a puppy..that bit a little girl because she was petting him while he was eating. It was one of her daughters friends. He also was begging for food and growled at my 1 year old because she was standing next to him not even touching him. My 5 year old daughter is no longer allowed to spend the night there because of him. My mother in law has stated before that she is scared of having my baby around him. My husband doesn't think he would bite her but I do.
He has bit her husband as well because he wanted to lay down on the bed with my mother in law and he is a 6+ ft. Man and over two hundred lbs. if he has the balls to bite him multiple times what's going to stop him from attacking one of my kids NOTHING! I don't trust it and I'm not going to put my kids in danger. She still asks my five year old to have sleep overs but we kindly decline but I can tell she gets mad.

#40 Tommy Coyote

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 04:14 PM

That is probably a good idea. So many of the attacks were on children.

There were just 2 more attacks. An 82 year old lady and her dog were killed in OKC. And a 6 month old baby was killed by a family pet.

The risk just isn't worth it. All it would take is one incident and you would lose your job, everything you own and spend years in jail. Not to mention having to live with what happened. Can you imagine if your dog killed your six month old baby? Your life would just be over because you could never live with that.

It's not worth it.


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