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Should I give up my sweet BC for a better (car free) life outside the suburbs?

rescue rehoming cars

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#21 Luana

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 11:49 AM

I have to say that I envy all of you with 100% bulletproof recall!

I was not able to get to this result,we are still in training... I mean my dog generally comes back but not always, and there are situations in a suburb environment that make him decide not to listen. 

I consider him an independent soul ;-)

he is trained with an invisible fence, as I have a small yard and cars are passing by right in front of my front yard.

so, outside in the yard he wears his e-collar, even if there are times I do not put the collar on, as he knows very well the perimeter.

life in a busy suburb with a BC involves quite some management as the amount of stimuli is often high, with different things happening at the same time.

 

as already suggested, herding is a very good off leash activity and a way to practice recall.

car fixation can be controlled with desensitization and counter-conditioning. my dog was like yours, everything on wheels was a huge trigger; he would either over-react or become frozen on the spot fixating on the moving thing.

he took a full year to have him ignore moving things and we still have some issues with the school bus...



#22 GentleLake

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 12:26 PM

Many years ago I was at the end of my wits with a car chaser so I reluctantly borrowed and tried an e-collar.

 

It worked . . . . for a while.

 

But it wasn't a permanent fix and when he started chasing cars again I wasn't willing to use it again.


"People in your life always come and go all the time; the dogs are always there for me. Always." ~Samantha Valle


#23 DutchBorderfan

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 12:14 PM

I have to say that I envy all of you with 100% bulletproof recall!

I was not able to get to this result,we are still in training... I mean my dog generally comes back but not always, and there are situations in a suburb environment that make him decide not to listen. 

 

haha! yep

 

100% recall huh? well come and try that here in Amsterdam, in the park with screaming kids, bikes, and 30 other hyped up dogs on the loose, with their owners not really paying that much attention. 

 

It's a challenge, but it's a fun one :)



#24 Donald McCaig

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 05:05 AM

Dear Doggers,

 

When Luke and June started eating botulism infected carrion, I went to George Cockrell, an ecollar expert,for a collar and advice. One lesson worked for about two years (with an unanticipated side effect) and had to be renewed. Next time the lesson faded that particular strain of botulism had disappeared so no more need.

 

Prez's ecollar recall is reinforced by praise every time and I don't expect to  repeat the ecollar.

 

Donald McCaig



#25 Blackdawgs

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 06:02 AM

What was the "unanticipated side effect"?



#26 Donald McCaig

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 06:09 AM

For some months after the first (very severe) ecollar correction, when I was butchering I'd take bones outside and toss them to the dogs.  Luke wouldn't touch a bone unless I gave it to him with my own hand.

 

Donald McCaig



#27 Blackdawgs

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 07:55 AM

I don't find that surprising at all.  And by continuing to give him bones (under some circumstances), you were probably (accidently) diluting your ecollar work.  Which is one of the reasons why ecollar-trained dogs needs refresher courses.

 

e.g Dog gets zapped with ecollar when it sees snake.  Then dog sees snake and doesn't get zapped, so original work with snake proofing becomes diluted over time.

 

Same goes for using the ecollar in the car chasing context, etc.



#28 D'Elle

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 11:49 AM

Having a dog who won't eat a bone unless it is handed to him by his owner is not such a bad thing.


D'Elle

and family.

Left to right: Kit, Jester, Boo, Digger

 

 

Mydogs12-2013Smaller.jpg
"You gonna throw that?" --Jester:  2001 - June 24 2016. Remembered with much love.
"I'm grouchier than you are" --Kit

"I love everyone!" -- Boo

(Boing! Boing! Boing!)--Digger

And not pictured, Benjamin the cat, who thinks he is a small border collie with superpowers.

 

 

 


#29 Donald McCaig

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 04:26 PM

Since the ecollar "bait" was organ meats, Luke generalized to bones. While I think the dog's understanding of how the world works can change over time I don't believe that older Fly's  not running so far on walks is a degrade - I don't run so far on walks either and my understanding isn't worse though my lungs are.

 

I think training degradation depends not on the training methods but how important the training is within a particular dog's world.  When Gael was dying, long after she couldn't have taken a flank or a down we had to carry her from her bed outside every four hours so she could pee or poop.

 

Donald McCaig



#30 moosikins

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 10:56 AM

If you go this route, I personally suggest the SportDog collar. It has very, very adjustable settings so you can tweak the amount of stimulation for a sensitive dog. Ours has 7 settings plus a vibrate with three buttons so essentially 21 levels of stimulation. My very, very stubborn BC/Lab works at a 2 low typically, we've never hit above a 5 low/med for her, and in the last year or so she's actually been off collar much more than on so the dog wouldn't necessarily be stuck on a collar for the rest of her life, if that's one of your fears (as I've commonly heard in arguments against the collars). 

 

Additionally, if you happen to be in the Midwest and choose to look into a rescue, feel free to message me because I am in touch with three large groups in the area that could assist you with both resources for training (the most common foster failures are with "problem" dogs that nobody else wants or that the fosters just can't bear to let go of) and a possible placement if you choose to go with that option. 

 

Dear Ms. Hibbs,

 

Wherever this dog goes there'll be cars and you're right - nobody can be vigilant all the time.

If she were mine I'd try an ecollar (shock collar) WITH INSTRUCTION FROM A GOOD ECOLLAR TRAINER. 

 

Please note: there are as many lousy ecollar trainers as lousy positive trainers and the lousy ecollar trainers can do more damage.  If you decide to try it, post me privately and I'll ask around for someone near you. "Near" to a sheepdogger means a one way. 2/3 hour drive.

 

Winnie can learn to loathe traffic but that would be easier if she had something better to obsess on WITH YOU. (Agiltiy, SAR, obedience, stock work.)

 

Ecollars aren't the first place I go with a dog but when it's life or death . . .

 

Donald McCaig


~ Calypso (BC/Lab) & Pandora (BC) ~

Check out comebyebcrescue.com for available dogs! 


#31 Lawgirl

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 06:09 PM

Interestingly, where I live (the state of South Australia) it is illegal to place on an animal any collar designed to deliver an electric shock, whether you use the function or not.  Maximum penalty is a $10,000 fine or 1 year imprisonment.

This is in our animal welfare legislation.



#32 Donald McCaig

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 09:01 AM

Dear Doggers,

They're illegal in some european countries as well and, I believe, the UK.  I don't thjink they should be illegal but they should be liicensed. They're too powerful a tool for the undogsavvy.

 

Donald McCaig





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