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  2. Oh yes, the cat. Do not allow the cat to interfere with Max's meals. Don't permit the cat to annoy or intimidate him in any way. If you don't stop this it could potentially build up a resentment in Max that might cause a blowout in the future which could be harmful to the cat. Plus, in no household should one animal be permitted to torment or intimidate another.
  3. First, welcome to the BC Boards, and thanks for taking on this dog and for coming here to ask for help now that you are having serious issues with him. I have dealt with severely damaged foster border collies and have had some success with them, so I hope my advice is helpful to you, although without being there myself it is not easy to know the details of what will be best. My first thought is that you need to back up completely and treat this dog as if he were a damaged and fearful dog who just came to you yesterday. This means you don't push him in any direction. don't let him roam in the area where he will get burs in his fur at all until you can gain back his trust, as doing the de-burring is clearly traumatizing him. I would, if I were in your situation, simply leave him alone a lot. don't call him. Don't reach out to pet him. Do not approach him directly. Spend time just sitting on the floor outside his crate if he is in there, or on the floor of whatever room he is in, but a few feet away, not looking at him or reaching for him. Get a cushion. Read a book. If he comes out to be near you, gently acknowledge him and pet him and speak kindly and softly to him but don't try for anything more than that. Let him be the one to choose to come to you and to limit your interactions according to his comfort level. Start from the beginning and work very, very slowly to rebuild his trust in you. In order not to have him get in the burs you will have to take him out on leash. When he pulls, simply turn in the other direction and walk that way. Don't say anything, don't jerk the leash, don't turn so suddenly that the leash pulls him off balance. Just turn around and walk the other way. He runs and pulls in that direction, turn around again. This means most of your walks will be going around in small circles. So be it. Every time he takes even two steps with the leash not taught, praise him and walk in whatever direction he wants to go for as long as he is not pulling. He pulls again, turn around. Repeat. And repeat. In time he will learn he only gets anywhere by walking nicely and not pulling. Make sure to let him go wherever he wants ( not into the burrs) when he is walking nicely, and to keep praising him. As for the lunging and nipping, this is a potentially serious problem and you will need to address this, possibly with the help of a qualified animal behaviorist and/or trainer who uses positive reinforcement methods. But for right now, just concentrate on gaining back his trust and allowing him to relax in the new house. This is the most important thing now, is step #1, because the other issue cannot be properly addressed until he has a relationship with you that you can use in the training. Make sure you are not walking him anywhere that there will be other people and/or dogs, so as to avoid that completely for now. Best of luck and report back to us to let us know how it is going. This forum is a wonderful resource.
  4. And it certainly depends on the owner - what one person finds onerous, another finds to be enjoyable interaction with their pup/dog. I haven't found mine to be a lot of work but I have found it fun to work (sometimes a lot) with them!
  5. Today
  6. Hey all. Sorry for this rather long post. I'm hoping for some help from people who've dealt with a sensitive and fearful male BC. Some background: Max is a purebred BC, almost 3yrs, who has been with us since September 2017. His first owner kept him in a small apartment, and we don't know much more about him than that. His second owner, who had Max for about one year, was a disabled Veteran. We picked up Max from his home and found him outdoors in a cage in the South Carolina heat. The cage was about 6x4 so he had room to move around, but he'd been gnawing and chewing at the wooden frame and it was obvious he'd been in some distress. His owner admitted that being disabled, he didn't have a lot of time to exercise Max, and that he'd used a shock collar when letting him out in the yard. When we approached Max he got extremely excited, jumping up at us and just looking so thrilled to see someone, something to play with. (He still does this now when he meets certain strangers). So we took Max home and he settled in very well. We had a one acre yard, fenced-in, and my girlfriend and I both work from home, so Max is rarely left alone. He was obviously obsessed with fetch - ball, stick, frisbee - it really doesn't matter what so long as there's something to throw and something for him to fetch. We took him to obedience class and basic agility, but there were issues. There are some people he doesn't like and if they get close to him he'll lunge and nip. He dislikes all other animals he's met so far and sometimes he'll lunge and nip, mostly he just tries to move out of their way. He doesn't seem at all socialized around other dogs, he doesn't seem to know how to do the butt sniff introduction that most other dogs do. We had to pull him from classes due to his unpredictable behavior. Other than that, the only other issues we had with him in the first 10 months was that we just couldn't leash train him - he pulls and pulls. And to be fair, we perhaps haven't tried hard enough to train him on the leash as we really don't go places where he needs to be on a leash too often. We lived near the ocean so we'd regularly take him to the beach and he just LOVES the water and playing fetch. Max really has been a great dog, he's never done the stuff that many dogs do like getting into the garbage, chewing furniture, escaping when off-leash etc. he just loves to be besides us, waiting for his regular outdoor fetch break or playing games in the house. That said, Max isn't very affectionate, he's a little aloof and likes some space. He's not into petting or hugging, he just follows us around looking forward to playing fetch. Then we moved house. We moved from a nice house in NC to a larger farmhouse in VA, with 50 acres. Most of the land is rented out to a local cattle farmer but we have access to it and Max has plenty of space to run around and play frisbee. We never let him out unattended. With the farmhouse we inherited a friendly tomcat who soon moved in the house with us. (after a couple trips to the vets for his shots etc). Things have started to go downhill with Max since we moved. Firstly, there are certain trees on the property that drop burrs. The burrs are about the size of a marble and are sharp. He'd pick them up in his belly hair and under his armpits and they'd obviously cause some discomfort. When we tried to cut them out of him he'd get aggressive with us, snarling and snapping. When we let him go he'd run off and hide in his kennel. We mostly manage to keep him away from the burrs but he's picked them up in his long hair perhaps a half dozen times since we moved here 3 months ago. Each time has been an ordeal. The problem now is that he doesn't seem to trust us anymore, he seems genuinely afraid. When we call him by his name, he'll sometimes just run and hide in his kennel. If one of us is just sitting on the couch or whatever and he walks by and we try to pet him, he'll back right off then run for his kennel. Each time we have to deal with a burr issue he gets progressively more fearful. It's at the point now where he won't even let us groom him. He never really liked being brushed much, but he'd deal with it. Now as soon as we reach for the brush he'll run and hide in his kennel. Aside from that, he clearly dislikes the cat and looks on with a very perturbed expression when we show the cat any affection. The cat tries to rub up against Max and the dog just walks away quickly. Max is very timid around the cat. Max can be eating dinner and the cat will come along and start eating out of Max's bowl and Max will walk away quickly. Anyway, I feel like we're losing him, like he doesn't trust us anymore, and it's disconcerting. He hasn't needed de-burring in three weeks but his attitude towards us hasn't improved, he just seems to be perpetually on guard and living in fear. I feel bad for Max, he has what seems to be an almost perfect home, with two people who love him, but he isn't happy. Any thoughts on what we can do? Does anyone have any similar stories they'd care to share, with tips on what they did to overcome the issues? Many thanks Rooze
  7. Icaraa

    Seemingly unhappy 10 week old

    Interestingly I keep seeing this on here. Are you in the US? Here in the UK I don’t see many Border Collies on the rehoming sites. Maybe people know the breed better here? So their expectations are different. Certainly everyone who I speak to about our dog says “Oh, Border Collies are a lot of work aren’t they?”. But he really isn’t, at all. Depends on the actual dog.
  8. Meet Snickers and her trick of the day!!!! She is amazing! snickers video basket.rtfd.zip
  9. Ohalani

    Wheeler

    Wheeler is adorable! It looks like he has grown a lot.
  10. Ohalani

    Seemingly unhappy 10 week old

    My shepherd mix, Jessie, didn't like to cuddle as a young puppy. I was worried, but she grew out of it and is now the kind of dog that always wants to be touching me. I find that just playing with my dogs without a training agenda is important to our relationship. I incorporate lots of playing into all our training, so it is all a game, but at other times I just play with absolutely no other purpose than just having fun. (Actually this does serve a purpose because if my dogs think I'm fun, and that playing with me is great, I can use play as a reward . Another game you can try is hide and seek, where you hide and the puppy finds you. There are lots of ways to play this, and maybe you already do it. Here are a couple ways to play: One person holds the puppy while you run and hide. Hide in a really easy place at first (Like crouch behind a sofa, but peek out so she can see your face) and you can even call and encourage the puppy to find you. If she comes and finds you make a big fuss and tell her how clever she is. You can reward with treats or toys too. Or you can just run away from your puppy and quickly hide behind something and let her find you. Once she gets better at this game, you can hide in trickier places so she actually has to sniff you out. Jessie loves to find hidden people. It is her favorite game. Good luck with your puppy, and let us know how its going!
  11. Yesterday
  12. jami74

    Keeping my busy boy busy!

    Oh goodness, I wish I could find something to keep our boy busy when no-one is available to play with him. Kongs are a mixture of kibble and canned food and then frozen. They rarely take as long as half an hour. He usually has two a day, now he's getting bigger and hungrier he also gets a small bowl meal as well. He's got a couple of toys which are rubbery or made of silicone that I'll smear peanut butter on for him to lick and chew when he's being busy and I want a few minutes. Big soft toys (a perk of having quite big children is having a cupboard full of once loved teddies), he loves dragging them around, giving them a good shake or licking and chewing them. Sometimes he has a quick hump too I did the rolling treats in a blanket that was posted in another thread. Excellent game but only takes him 2 minutes, so not really something to keep him busy. Saying that, he seems to be spending more time laying around and sleeping so maybe he is growing up and calming down.
  13. Rush Fan

    Keeping my busy boy busy!

    Mancer loves the wishbone shaped Benebones with various flavoring infused into them. She also has a couple of the "dental dog chew toy" also made by benebone (and also flavor infused), which supposedly help keep teeth clean and seem to take a bit longer to chew through. Be careful with the jerky treats, especially if they're made in China, as many of them are. I remember a year or two ago several of them were recalled for "making dogs sick".
  14. D'Elle

    Keeping my busy boy busy!

    I would second the warnings about those bones, and add a recommendation that you not permit your pup to chew up wood or paper, either. Paper bits can be swallowed and then form a congealed mass in the stomach that is hard or impossible for the dog to pass. I have known this to happen to a dog I knew. Wood bits are splintery and can lodge in the throat or in the stomach and pierce internal walls and/or cause obstruction. There's a reason that so many hard-to-destroy dog toys are made; because most things that puppies or chewing adult dogs choose to chew up are actually dangerous. Get your puppy a bunch of hard chew toys and don't permit other things to be used. If she ignores them at first, just don't allow her to have alternatives and eventually she will use them. You won't forgive yourself if you permit her to harm herself with those things you are letting her have. (And your checking account might take a while to recover as well!)
  15. D'Elle

    Raising a calm city pup

    Not only has he learned, he has also taught you what works to train him. I have found that the dogs I have trained taught me far more than I taught them, in the long run. Congrats on the great progress. :-)
  16. Denise Wall

    MDR1 - can we eradicate?

    I finally got a chance to go through this video again trying to pay more attention to detail. Basically, my take on it is, as is obvious, it's not good to use high dose ivermectin (group 1). Lots of problems. In group 2, these dogs, different breeds and with their MDR1 status unknown, were already suspected of having retinal problems in association with regular heart worm meds alone or in association with other flea and tick products. Group 3 contains a "pure" group of dogs taking only regular dose HW meds but again, no info about the breeds or other info such as HDR1 status of the dogs. Group 3 also contains a control group that took no HW product and consequently showed little retinal toxicity. So group 2 that would be most dogs as far as their mix of various HW, flea and tick products. But it's not exactly a pure group since they were already suspected to have retinal toxicity in association with HW/flea/tick products. As would be expected, this group did have various positive signs of retinal toxicity, some of it reversible once removed from the meds. Group 3 (non control) was the most disturbing to me with about 21% of retinal showed retinal abnormalities. This is the group I don't know what to think about. This was just regular dose HW med. I think there is evidence that there can be retinal problems with ivermectin/heart worm meds either alone or in combination with certain flea and tick products. Retinal problems may not be the only problems either. However, we really don't know much about which dogs, which breeds and whether the dogs had other problems contributing to these problems in this study at least. I suspect this could involve MDR1 as it's a likely suspect but more research is needed. There are genes that regulate production of the protein the MDR1 gene produces that could be a major factor for example. As someone whose been in the literature on this topic a fair amount lately I have to say it's amazing to me how little research has been done on this pretty important gene product in dogs. Especially given the number of breeds with high rates of mutation in this gene. Perhaps studies like the one in this video will lead the way to more sophisticated ones with more answers and better guidelines and better products. So that's my follow up on the video. I hope I didn't miss anything.
  17. Hooper2

    Keeping my busy boy busy!

    I don't THINK I paid less for my own root canal than I did for my dog's root canal, I KNOW I did. By quite a bit. It turned out my dog had a root canal for a broken canine tooth on Monday, and had my own root canal on the following Wednesday. The receptionist at my dentist's office was sort of apologetic when she presented me with the bill for the portion not covered by my insurance. I laughed and told her that I had just paid $700 more for my dog's root canal than the total bill for my root canal. I could hear my dentist muttering "I'm in the wrong business" as he walked by. To be fair to vet dentists, much of the additional cost for a dog's dentistry is because dogs need to be anaesthetized and humans usually don't. Anyhoo, I whole-heartedly agree with the warnings above: no weight bearing bones, no antlers, no nylabones. Which is a great pity, because my dogs loved them.
  18. terrecar

    Keeping my busy boy busy!

    I second the warning against weight bearing bones from large ungulates. Root canal therapy performed on a dog’s molar isn’t cheap. Ask me how I know. I think I paid less for my own root canal.
  19. GentleLake

    Keeping my busy boy busy!

    Weight bearing bones from large ungulates are too hard for dogs and pose a great risk for breaking teeth. Even ribs and necks are often too hard for most dogs. Better to make bone broth from beef/bison bones. Freezing them make them mush more dangerous. Now if you can get tracheas to stuff and freeze, that's a much safer option.
  20. I agree with all of the above. Especially that a little pup will come around and bond just fine in a short time so don't despair. You might also try just sitting on the floor and having her approach you and letting her make up the game. Like shellyf said, be a bit aloof. Sometimes she might bring a toy for tugging or throwing. Sometimes it might be chase me. (I've found fast crawling on a rug to be a strangely good workout). Sometimes it might even be a cuddle.
  21. ShellyF

    Keeping my busy boy busy!

    Great idea re canned food. I over-stuffed a kong today and put too much ground flax in so it went a bit like concrete. I had to help haha! Oh yes - kibble in boxes! Our little guy loves it when we get Amazon deliveries haha!
  22. Oh. And raw beef or bison bones straight from the freezer. Very effective.
  23. I like to get stuffed animals from the thrift store. 99¢ so the relatively short half life is fine. (Just avoid the ones with the little beads inside... ) Wish I had a sewing machine though! Great idea to make toys from scraps! (maybe a new business awaits for you....?) Gani also helps to pre-recycle things like empty toilet paper rolls and junk mail. The shredded bits still go in the recycling bin when she's done. Boxes large and small are fun too. Shoe boxes, Amazon boxes, pasta boxes. Add a few treats or stuff a toy in and "let her rip". She likes to make kindling for the wood stove even smaller too. Again, scraps still go into the stove when she's done. For kongs I've been using good quality canned dog food to stick the kibble together. Seems better for her than peanut butter on a regular basis, though I still mix some in sometimes because she loves it.
  24. Last week
  25. Lawgirl

    Raising a calm city pup

    Awesome work to both of you, congratulations! They really are such smart dogs, I love to see their brains working behind their eyes. I also second the notion that we like puppy photos!
  26. Will do..Thank you GentleLake x
  27. My 9 month old gets good exercise and naps and play but sometimes he just likes to be busy in his own corner. Since he finished teething he has zero interest in a whole range of chews and bones. He does like more foodie chews like jerky or whimsies but they don’t last five minutes. He loves stuffed kongs so I mix some of his Acana kibble with things like raw egg, chopped carrot, cooked liver and grated cheese with a bit of ground flax to bind it and that takes a good half hour if I really stuff the kong well. He doesn’t like them frozen. For non food treats I have an old sail that I cut into pieces and then sew them into different shapes stuffed with plastic water bottles and stuffing saved from demolished dog toys etc. I also sew on handles and dangly bits so they make tug toys when needed or just to add interest. It takes less than five minutes to run them up on the sewing machine but they are virtually free so it doesn’t matter if he rips them up lol! Would love other ideas for busy pups
  28. GentleLake

    Raising a calm city pup

    Awesome! Well done, both of you.
  29. Please keep us posted. Best wishes for a good outcome.
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